Hello, My Name Is Ruby
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Hello, My Name Is Ruby

by Philip C. Stead
     
 

Join Ruby, a plucky little bird, as she ventures through life, making new friends, learning new skills and asking questions which may have some very surprising results.

Fearless Ruby's search for adventure, friendship and her place in the world comes to life through acclaimed author/illustrator Philip C. Stead's whimsical illustrations and succinct, charming

Overview

Join Ruby, a plucky little bird, as she ventures through life, making new friends, learning new skills and asking questions which may have some very surprising results.

Fearless Ruby's search for adventure, friendship and her place in the world comes to life through acclaimed author/illustrator Philip C. Stead's whimsical illustrations and succinct, charming text.

This title has Common Core connections.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Stead’s (A Home for Bird) latest is simultaneously a story about making friends and a celebration of line, color, and form. Ruby’s small yellow body and big beak make her a distant cousin of Charles Schulz’s Woodstock, and the birds she introduces herself to sport an array of wacky beaks and frizzy feathers. She flies with a heron and meets a diminutive red bird who takes flight with the rest of its flock to form the silhouette of a huge red elephant in response to Ruby’s question, “Are you ever afraid because you are small?” One bird refuses her overtures: “No thank you,” it says, and stalks away; Ruby stands dejected, then pushes on. To an ostrichlike bird, she explains, “A name is a sound that is all yours... ROOO-beee, ROOO-beee.” “SKEEP-wock,” the bird replies. “I have heard your name before.” Skeepwock knows where there are many other Rubys—giving Ruby the chance to acquaint new friends and old. Ruby exemplifies the willingness to see the good in everyone, and Stead’s artwork echoes her joyousness. Ages 2–6. Agent: Emily Van Beek, Folio Literary Management. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

“*Stead's flora-filled settings and free-spirited style will feel happily familiar to readers of A Home for Bird (2012); the fresh storyline follows the range of reactions to an extroverted personality. . . A final encounter helps the heroine and readers comprehend and value the concepts of name and identity--and the blessings that reaching out to a diverse community bestows.” —Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Ruby exemplifies the willingness to see the good in everyone, and Stead's artwork echoes her joyousness.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review

“This deceptively simple tale eloquently explores the universal theme of making friends. . . This irresistible read-aloud, with its recognizable and much-loved theme, will resonate with children.” —School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Caldecott author Stead brings to the very young an adventure of their own with a small yellow bird named Ruby, who is not afraid to introduce herself to strange birds and even encounters some taller animals like giraffes and elephants. An almost-heron takes her flying, while a sort-of humming bird is more prosaic—he prefers to walk with slower creatures like a snail and a turtle. Undaunted, Ruby moves on to find, in a most unexpected place, a small red bird who shows her how a flock of friends can make you feel immense as an elephant. Turning up on an ice floe, Ruby introduces herself to a possible penguin, and later encounters a tall, purple-feathered fowl, who curtly rejects her friendship, leaving Ruby singing sadly, alone in a two-page spread of vertical grey rain. But small listeners will no doubt be cheered as Ruby, led by another odd bird named Skeepwok, at last encounters a flock of yellow birds much like herself and has the joy of introducing them to seven of her more unusual new friends. To go with his minimal text, Stead has used pastel or crayon, watercolor, and markers in a whimsical, spontaneous style full of white spaces, capturing Ruby’s eagerness and innocence in her quest for friendship, identity, and new experiences. The final satisfying pages fill with warm backgrounds of sunny orange and flamingo coral. Not as structured as Stead’s A Home for Bird, this tale of fearless little Ruby will no doubt find many friends among its youngest viewers and listeners. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 2 to 6.
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
PreS-Gr 1—This deceptively simple tale eloquently explores the universal theme of making friends. "Hello, my name is Ruby," says a small yellow bird as she encounters a variety of avian counterparts and discovers the shared pleasures of flying and walking. Another bird shows her that she need not feel small when she is among friends. But then one of her overtures, "Would you like to be my friend?" is met with rejection when a large bird with striking plumage says, "No, thank you." In a poignant wordless illustration, Ruby stands in the rain, singing a sad song. After the sun dries her feathers, she meets a "curious bird" who peers at her from a great height. Ruby explains that a name "is a sound that is all yours," and the pair exchange names: "ROOO-beee, ROOO-beee-OOO-beee-OOO-beee./SKEEP-wock, replied the bird. SKEEEEEP-wock-wock-wock." Skeepwock is glad to meet her and tells her that he's heard her name before, leading her to a tree full of yellow birds just like her. Stead pairs a minimal amount of text with ingeniously crafted, mixed-media illustrations. Varying perspectives and brilliant use of color and line give voice to Ruby's emotions: from shy wonderment to abject rejection and, finally, infectious delight. This irresistible read-aloud, with its recognizable and much-loved theme, will resonate with children.—Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Stead's flora-filled settings and free-spirited style will feel happily familiar to readers of A Home for Bird (2012); the fresh storyline follows the range of reactions to an extroverted personality. Ruby is a diminutive, yellow bird whose frequent introductions are a touch formal: "I am glad to meet you." She fearlessly initiates conversation with much bigger birds and is the kind of friend who offers ideas and is willing to try the suggestions of others. In the process, much is gleaned about avian (and human) behavior. In a nod to Leo Lionni, a red warbler her size shows Ruby how not to feel small: The flock flies in an elephant formation, their collective shape larger than any pachyderm in the herd. Stead places the protagonist in a variety of situations, at one point allowing listeners to finish a sentence, at another permitting silence to heighten emotion, as when Ruby stands alone in a gray rainstorm, rebuffed. Wide, energetic crayon strokes color her expansive world in shades transitioning from sky blue to sunset coral. Thin circular lines suggest ponds and trees. Rendered in gouache, the expressive animals are the focus, whether on glaciers or in grasslands. A final encounter helps the heroine and readers comprehend and value the concepts of name and identity--and the blessings that reaching out to a diverse community bestows. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596438095
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
09/03/2013
Pages:
36
Sales rank:
733,622
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author


Philip C. Stead is the author of the 2011 Caldecott Medal book, A Sick Day for Amos McGee. His most recent book, A Home for Bird, received four starred reviews and was called "a deeply satisfying story" by Kirkus. Philip lives with his wife, illustrator Erin E. Stead, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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