Hell's Kitchen (John Pellam Series #3) [NOOK Book]

Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of The Empty Chair and The Devil's Teardrop, is back displaying his "ticking-bomb suspense" (People) in this never-before-published thriller.
Every New York City neighborhood has a story, but what John Pellam uncovers in Hell's Kitchen has a darkness all its own. The Hollywood location scout and former stuntman is in the Big Apple hoping to capture the unvarnished memories of longtime Kitchen residents such as Ettie Washington in a ...
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Hell's Kitchen (John Pellam Series #3)

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Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of The Empty Chair and The Devil's Teardrop, is back displaying his "ticking-bomb suspense" (People) in this never-before-published thriller.
Every New York City neighborhood has a story, but what John Pellam uncovers in Hell's Kitchen has a darkness all its own. The Hollywood location scout and former stuntman is in the Big Apple hoping to capture the unvarnished memories of longtime Kitchen residents such as Ettie Washington in a no-budget documentary film. But when a suspicious fire ravages the elderly woman's crumbling tenement, Pellam realizes that someone might want the past to stay buried.
As more buildings and lives go up in flames, Pellam takes to the streets, seeking the twisted pyromaniac who sells services to the highest bidder. But Pellam is unaware that the fires are merely flickering preludes to the arsonist's ultimate masterpiece, a conflagration of nearly unimaginable proportion, with Hell's Kitchen -- and John Pellam -- at its blackened and searing epicenter.
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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
In this finely crafted book, a departure from his more ambitious thrillers, author Deaver works with a more focused plot and fewer characters. John Pellam is working on a documentary about the people who live in Hell's Kitchen, a rough New York neighborhood. His principal subject is Ettie Washington, a seventy-two-year-old black woman who has lived in the area her entire life. One day, while walking up the stairs to Ettie's apartment to tape yet another interview, Pellam is caught in a fiery explosion that decimates the building, injures Ettie and kills a child. The authorities quickly conclude that the fire was the work of a young arsonist named Sonny. Based on their limited evidence, they further suggest that Sonny was hired by the elderly Ettie as part of an insurance scam. Convinced of Ettie's innocence, Pellam shoulders his camera and begins asking questions throughout the neighborhood. In his search for leads, the filmmaker crosses paths with a Cuban gang member, a homeless kid and a billionaire real estate developer, among others. In Hell's Kitchen, every character has a hidden agenda that is only revealed at the exciting climax.
—Jennifer Braunschweiger

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Edgar Award-nominated Deaver (Bloody River Blues, etc.) exposes the brutal side of the Big Apple as John Pellam, a former Hollywood location scout, takes to the streets of Hell's Kitchen to film a documentary. Pellam is on his way to check on one of his interviewees, an elderly woman named Ettie, when he smells smoke and sees flames engulfing Ettie's tenement. Unfortunately, Pellam can't get near her fifth floor apartment, and she jumps out the window to land on a pile of trash bags. Pellam soon finds that Ettie is the prime suspect in the arson; she's kept in prison after another resident dies of injuries suffered in the fire. In an attempt to exonerate Ettie and uncover the true culprit who has been lighting fires around the city, Pellam ends up talking to some unnecessarily grouchy detectives, fire investigators and local thugs. Despite the ethnic mix of characters that populate this gritty mystery, readers may find that some of the details are overly gruesome (e.g., the arsonist's description of burning bodies) and Pellam's character is lacking in charisma. In addition, his extreme dedication to this one old woman merely because he's interviewed her seems less than plausible. (Feb.) Forecast: It's notable that this is an original Deaver novel, a fresh addition to a series that's been reprinted by Pocket and was written before the author became a near-household name with his Lincoln Rhyme novels. With Deaver's name on the cover, and with booksellers explaining to fans that it's a new item, the book should score big. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743424035
  • Publisher: Pocket Books
  • Publication date: 8/11/2001
  • Series: John Pellam Series , #3
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 119,775
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jeffery  Deaver
Jeffery Deaver is the author of two collections of short stories and twenty-eight suspense novels. He is best known for his Kathryn Dance and Lincoln Rhyme thrillers, most notably The Bone Collector, which was made into a feature starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie. His many awards include the Novel of the Year at the International Thriller Writers’ Awards in 2009 for his standalone novel The Bodies Left Behind. The latest entries in the Lincoln Rhyme series are The Cold Moon, The Broken Window, and The Burning Wire.

Deaver has been nominated for seven Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America, an Anthony Award and a Gumshoe Award. He was recently short-listed for the ITV3 Crime Thriller Award for Best International Author. His books are sold in 150 countries and translated into twenty-five languages. He lives in North Carolina.

Biography

Born just outside Chicago in 1950 to an advertising copywriter father and stay-at-home mom, Jeffery Deaver was a writer from the start, penning his first book (a brief tome just two chapters in length) at age 11. He went on to edit his high school literary magazine and serve on the staff of the school newspaper, chasing the dream of becoming a crack reporter.

Upon earning his B.A. in journalism from the University of Missouri, Deaver realized that he lacked the necessary background to become a legal correspondent for the high-profile publications he aspired to, such as The New York Times or The Wall Street Journal, so he enrolled at Fordham Law School. Being a legal eagle soon grew on Deaver, and rather than continue on as a reporter, he took a job as a corporate lawyer at a top Wall Street firm. Deaver's detour from the writing life wasn't to last, however; ironically, it was his substantial commute to the law office that touched off his third -- and current -- career. He'd fill the long hours on the train scribbling his own renditions of the kind of fiction he enjoyed reading most: suspense.

Voodoo, a supernatural thriller, and Always a Thief, an art-theft caper, were Deaver's first published novels. Produced by the now-defunct Paperjacks paperback original house, the books are no longer in print, but they remain hot items on the collector circuit. His first major outing was the Rune series, which followed the adventures of an aspiring female filmmaker in the power trilogy Manhattan Is My Beat (1988), Death of a Blue Movie Star (1990), and Hard News (1991).

Deaver's next series, this one featuring the adventures of ace movie location scout John Pellam, featured the thrillers Shallow Graves (1992), Bloody River Blues (1993), and Hell's Kitchen (2001). Written under the pen name William Jefferies, the series stands out in Deaver's body of work, primarily because it touched off his talent for focusing more on his vivid characters than on their perilous situations.

In fact, it is his series featuring the intrepid and beloved team of Lincoln Rhyme and Amelia Sachs that showcases Deaver at the top of his game. Confronting enormous odds (and always under somewhat gruesome circumstances), the embittered detective and his feisty partner and love interest made their debut in 1991's grisly caper The Bone Collector, and hooked fans for four more books: The Coffin Dancer (1998), The Empty Chair (2000), The Stone Monkey (2002), and The Vanishing Man(2003). Of the series, Kirkus Reviews observed, "Deaver marries forensic work that would do Patricia Cornwell proud to turbocharged plots that put Benzedrine to shame."

On the creation of Rhyme, who happens to be a paraplegic, Deaver explained to Shots magazine, "I wanted to create a Sherlock Holmes-ian kind of character that uses his mind rather than his body. He solves crimes by thinking about the crimes, rather than someone who can shoot straight, run faster, or walk into the bar and trick people into giving away the clues."

As for his reputation for conjuring up some of the most unsavory scenes in pop crime fiction, Deaver admits on his web site, "In general, I think, less is more, and that if a reader stops reading because a book is too icky then I've failed in my obligation to the readers."

Good To Know

Deaver revises his manuscripts "at least 20 or 30 times" before his publishers get to even see a version.

Two of his books have been made into major feature films. The first was A Maiden's Grave (the film adaptation was called Dead Silence), which starred James Garner and Marlee Matlin. The Bone Collector came next, starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie.

In addition to being a bestselling novelist, Deaver has also been a folksinger, songwriter, music researcher, and professional poet.

Deaver's younger sister, Julie Reece Deaver, is a fellow author who writes novels for young adults.

In our interview with Deaver, he reveals, "My inspiration for writing is the reader. I want to give readers whatever will excite and please them. It's absolutely vital in this business for authors to know their audience and to write with them in mind."

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    1. Also Known As:
      William Jefferies, Jeffery Wilds Deaver
    2. Hometown:
      Washington, D.C.
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 6, 1950
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Missouri; Juris Doctor, cum laude, Fordham University School of Law
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt


Chapter One

He climbed the stairs, his boots falling heavily on burgundy floral carpet and, where it was threadbare, on the scarred oak beneath.

The stairwell was unlit; in neighborhoods like this one the bulbs were stolen from the ceiling sockets and the emergency exit signs as soon as they were replaced.

John Pellam lifted his head, tried to place a curious smell. He couldn't. Knew only that it left him feeling unsettled, edgy.

Second floor, the landing, starting up another flight.

This was maybe his tenth time to the old tenement but he was still finding details that had eluded him on prior visits. Tonight what caught his eye was a stained-glass valance depicting a hummingbird hovering over a yellow flower.

In a hundred-year-old tenement, in one of the roughest parts of New York City....Why beautiful stained glass? And why a hummingbird?

A shuffle of feet sounded above him and he glanced up. He'd thought he was alone. Something fell, a soft thud. A sigh.

Like the undefinable smell, the sounds left him uneasy.

Pellam paused on the third-floor landing and looked at the stained glass above the door to apartment 3B. This valance -- a bluebird, or jay, sitting on a branch -- was as carefully done as the hummingbird downstairs. When he'd first come here, several months ago, he'd glanced at the scabby facade and expected that the interior would be decrepit. But he'd been wrong. It was a craftsman's showpiece: oak floorboards joined solid as steel, walls of plaster seamless as marble, the sculpted newel posts and banisters, arched alcoves (built into the walls to hold, presumably, Catholic icons). He --

That smell again. Stronger now. His nostrils flared. Another thud above him. A gasp. He felt urgency and, looking up, he continued along the narrow stairs, listing against the weight of the Betacam, batteries and assorted videotaping effluence in the bag. He was sweating rivers. It was ten P.M. but the month was August and New York was at its most demonic.

What was that smell?

The scent flirted with his memory then vanished again, obscured by the aroma of frying onions, garlic and overused oil. He remembered that Ettie kept a Folgers coffee can filled with old grease on her stove. "Saves me some money, I'll tell you."

Halfway between the third and fourth floors Pellam paused again, wiped his stinging eyes. That's what did it. He remembered:

A Studebaker.

He pictured his parent's purple car, the late 1950s, resembling a spaceship, burning slowly down to the tires. His father had accidentally dropped a cigarette on the seat, igniting the upholstery of the Buck Rogers car. Pellam, his parents and the entire block watched the spectacle in horror or shock or secret delight.

What he smelled now was the same. Smoulder, smoke. Then a cloud of hot fumes wafted around him. He glanced over the banister into the stairwell. At first he saw nothing but darkness and haze; then, with a huge explosion, the door to the basement blew inward and flames like rocket exhaust filled the stairwell and the tiny first-floor lobby.

"Fire!" Pellam shouted, as the black cloud preceding the flames boiled up at him. He was banging on the nearest door. There was no answer. He started down the stairs but the fire drove him back, the tidal wave of smoke and sparks was too thick. He began to choke and felt a shudder through his body from the grimy air he was breathing. He gagged.

Goddamn, it was moving fast! Flames, chunks of paper, flares of sparks swirled up like a cyclone through the stairwell, all the way to the sixth -- the top -- floor.

He heard a scream above him and looked into the stairwell.

"Ettie!"

The elderly woman's dark face looked over the railing from the fifth-floor landing, gazing in horror at the flames. She must've been the person he'd heard earlier, trudging up the stairs ahead of him. She held a plastic grocery bag in her hand. She dropped it. Three oranges rolled down the stairs past him and died in the flames, hissing and spitting blue sparks.

"John," she called, "what's...?" She coughed. "...the building." He couldn't make out any other words.

He started toward her but the fire had ignited the carpet and a pile of trash on the fourth floor. It flared in his face, the orange tentacles reaching for him, and he stumbled back down the stairs. A shred of burning wallpaper wafted upward, encircled his head. Before it did any damage it burned to cool ash. He stumbled back onto the third-floor landing, banged on another door.

"Ettie," he shouted up into the stairwell. "Get to a fire escape! Get out!"

Down the hall a door opened cautiously and a young Hispanic boy looked out, eyes wide, a yellow Power Ranger dangling in his hand.

"Call nine-one-one!" Pellam shouted. "Call! -- "

The door slammed shut. Pellam knocked hard. He thought he heard screams but he wasn't sure because the fire now sounded like a speeding truck, a deafening roar. The flames ate up the carpet and were disintegrating the banister like cardboard.

"Ettie," he shouted, choking on the smoke. He dropped to his knees.

"John! Save yourself. Get out. Run!"

The flames between them were growing. The wall, the flooring, the carpet. The valance exploded, raining hot shards of stained-glass birds on his face and shoulders.

How could it move so fast? Pellam wondered, growing faint. Sparks exploded around him, clicking and snapping like ricochets. There was no air. He couldn't breathe.

"John, help me!" Ettie screamed. "It's on that side. I can't -- " The wall of fire had encircled her. She couldn't reach the window that opened onto the fire escape.

From the fourth floor down and the second floor up, the flames advanced on him. He looked up and saw Ettie, on the fifth floor, backing away from the sheet of flame that approached her. The portion of the stairs separating them collapsed. She was trapped two stories above him.

He was retching, batting at flecks of cinders burning holes in his work shirt and jeans. The wall exploded outward. A finger of flame shot out. The tip caught Pellam on the arm and set fire to the gray shirt.

He didn't think so much about dying as he did the pain from fire. About it blinding him, burning his skin to black scar tissue, destroying his lungs.

He rolled on his arm and put the flame out, climbed to his feet. "Ettie!"

He looked up to see her turn away from the flames and fling open a window.

"Ettie," he shouted. "Try to get up to the roof. They'll get a hook and ladder..." He backed to the window, hesitated, then, with a crash, flung his canvas bag through the glass, the forty thousand dollars' worth of video camera rolling onto the metal stairs. A half dozen other tenants, in panic, ignored it and continued stumbling downward toward the alley.

Pellam climbed onto the fire escape and looked back.

"Get to the roof!" he cried to Ettie.

But maybe that path too was blocked; the flames were everywhere now.

Or maybe in her panic she just didn't think.

Through the boiling fire, his eyes met hers and she gave a faint smile. Then without a scream or shout that he could hear, Etta Wilkes Washington broke out a window long ago painted shut, and paused for a moment, looking down. Then she leapt into the air fifty feet above the cobblestoned alley beside the building, the alley that, Pellam recalled, contained the cobblestone on which Isaac B. Cleveland had scratched his declaration of love for teenage Ettie Wilkes fifty-five years ago. The old woman's slight frame vanished into the smoke.

A wheezing groan of timber and steel, then a crash, like a sledgehammer on metal, as something structural gave way. Pellam jumped back to the edge of the fire escape, nearly tumbling over the railing and, as the cascade of orange sparks flowed over him, staggered downstairs.

He was in as much of a hurry as the escaping tenants -- though the mission on his mind now wasn't to flee the ravaging fire but, thinking of Ettie's daughter, to find the woman's body and carry it away from the building before the walls collapsed, entombing it in a fiery, disfiguring grave.

Copyright © 2001 by Jeffery Deaver

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First Chapter

Chapter One

He climbed the stairs, his boots falling heavily on burgundy floral carpet and, where it was threadbare, on the scarred oak beneath.

The stairwell was unlit; in neighborhoods like this one the bulbs were stolen from the ceiling sockets and the emergency exit signs as soon as they were replaced.

John Pellam lifted his head, tried to place a curious smell. He couldn't. Knew only that it left him feeling unsettled, edgy.

Second floor, the landing, starting up another flight.

This was maybe his tenth time to the old tenement but he was still finding details that had eluded him on prior visits. Tonight what caught his eye was a stained-glass valance depicting a hummingbird hovering over a yellow flower.

In a hundred-year-old tenement, in one of the roughest parts of New York City....Why beautiful stained glass? And why a hummingbird?

A shuffle of feet sounded above him and he glanced up. He'd thought he was alone. Something fell, a soft thud. A sigh.

Like the undefinable smell, the sounds left him uneasy.

Pellam paused on the third-floor landing and looked at the stained glass above the door to apartment 3B. This valance %151; a bluebird, or jay, sitting on a branch %151; was as carefully done as the hummingbird downstairs. When he'd first come here, several months ago, he'd glanced at the scabby facade and expected that the interior would be decrepit. But he'd been wrong. It was a craftsman's showpiece: oak floorboards joined solid as steel, walls of plaster seamless as marble, the sculpted newel posts and banisters, arched alcoves (built into the walls to hold, presumably, Catholic icons). He %151;

That smell again. Stronger now. His nostrils flared. Another thud above him. A gasp. He felt urgency and, looking up, he continued along the narrow stairs, listing against the weight of the Betacam, batteries and assorted videotaping effluence in the bag. He was sweating rivers. It was ten P.M. but the month was August and New York was at its most demonic.

What was that smell?

The scent flirted with his memory then vanished again, obscured by the aroma of frying onions, garlic and overused oil. He remembered that Ettie kept a Folgers coffee can filled with old grease on her stove. "Saves me some money, I'll tell you."

Halfway between the third and fourth floors Pellam paused again, wiped his stinging eyes. That's what did it. He remembered:

A Studebaker.

He pictured his parent's purple car, the late 1950s, resembling a spaceship, burning slowly down to the tires. His father had accidentally dropped a cigarette on the seat, igniting the upholstery of the Buck Rogers car. Pellam, his parents and the entire block watched the spectacle in horror or shock or secret delight.

What he smelled now was the same. Smoulder, smoke. Then a cloud of hot fumes wafted around him. He glanced over the banister into the stairwell. At first he saw nothing but darkness and haze; then, with a huge explosion, the door to the basement blew inward and flames like rocket exhaust filled the stairwell and the tiny first-floor lobby.

"Fire!" Pellam shouted, as the black cloud preceding the flames boiled up at him. He was banging on the nearest door. There was no answer. He started down the stairs but the fire drove him back, the tidal wave of smoke and sparks was too thick. He began to choke and felt a shudder through his body from the grimy air he was breathing. He gagged.

Goddamn, it was moving fast! Flames, chunks of paper, flares of sparks swirled up like a cyclone through the stairwell, all the way to the sixth %151; the top %151; floor.

He heard a scream above him and looked into the stairwell.

"Ettie!"

The elderly woman's dark face looked over the railing from the fifth-floor landing, gazing in horror at the flames. She must've been the person he'd heard earlier, trudging up the stairs ahead of him. She held a plastic grocery bag in her hand. She dropped it. Three oranges rolled down the stairs past him and died in the flames, hissing and spitting blue sparks.

"John," she called, "what's...?" She coughed. "...the building." He couldn't make out any other words.

He started toward her but the fire had ignited the carpet and a pile of trash on the fourth floor. It flared in his face, the orange tentacles reaching for him, and he stumbled back down the stairs. A shred of burning wallpaper wafted upward, encircled his head. Before it did any damage it burned to cool ash. He stumbled back onto the third-floor landing, banged on another door.

"Ettie," he shouted up into the stairwell. "Get to a fire escape! Get out!"

Down the hall a door opened cautiously and a young Hispanic boy looked out, eyes wide, a yellow Power Ranger dangling in his hand.

"Call nine-one-one!" Pellam shouted. "Call! %151; "

The door slammed shut. Pellam knocked hard. He thought he heard screams but he wasn't sure because the fire now sounded like a speeding truck, a deafening roar. The flames ate up the carpet and were disintegrating the banister like cardboard.

"Ettie," he shouted, choking on the smoke. He dropped to his knees.

"John! Save yourself. Get out. Run!"

The flames between them were growing. The wall, the flooring, the carpet. The valance exploded, raining hot shards of stained-glass birds on his face and shoulders.

How could it move so fast? Pellam wondered, growing faint. Sparks exploded around him, clicking and snapping like ricochets. There was no air. He couldn't breathe.

"John, help me!" Ettie screamed. "It's on that side. I can't %151; " The wall of fire had encircled her. She couldn't reach the window that opened onto the fire escape.

From the fourth floor down and the second floor up, the flames advanced on him. He looked up and saw Ettie, on the fifth floor, backing away from the sheet of flame that approached her. The portion of the stairs separating them collapsed. She was trapped two stories above him.

He was retching, batting at flecks of cinders burning holes in his work shirt and jeans. The wall exploded outward. A finger of flame shot out. The tip caught Pellam on the arm and set fire to the gray shirt.

He didn't think so much about dying as he did the pain from fire. About it blinding him, burning his skin to black scar tissue, destroying his lungs.

He rolled on his arm and put the flame out, climbed to his feet. "Ettie!"

He looked up to see her turn away from the flames and fling open a window.

"Ettie," he shouted. "Try to get up to the roof. They'll get a hook and ladder..." He backed to the window, hesitated, then, with a crash, flung his canvas bag through the glass, the forty thousand dollars' worth of video camera rolling onto the metal stairs. A half dozen other tenants, in panic, ignored it and continued stumbling downward toward the alley.

Pellam climbed onto the fire escape and looked back.

"Get to the roof!" he cried to Ettie.

But maybe that path too was blocked; the flames were everywhere now.

Or maybe in her panic she just didn't think.

Through the boiling fire, his eyes met hers and she gave a faint smile. Then without a scream or shout that he could hear, Etta Wilkes Washington broke out a window long ago painted shut, and paused for a moment, looking down. Then she leapt into the air fifty feet above the cobblestoned alley beside the building, the alley that, Pellam recalled, contained the cobblestone on which Isaac B. Cleveland had scratched his declaration of love for teenage Ettie Wilkes fifty-five years ago. The old woman's slight frame vanished into the smoke.

A wheezing groan of timber and steel, then a crash, like a sledgehammer on metal, as something structural gave way. Pellam jumped back to the edge of the fire escape, nearly tumbling over the railing and, as the cascade of orange sparks flowed over him, staggered downstairs.

He was in as much of a hurry as the escaping tenants %151; though the mission on his mind now wasn't to flee the ravaging fire but, thinking of Ettie's daughter, to find the woman's body and carry it away from the building before the walls collapsed, entombing it in a fiery, disfiguring grave.

Copyright © 2001 by Jeffery Deaver

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A different name, but the greatness remains the same

    For the last eight years, John Pellam has worked as a Production Scout for film companies. However, in the last three months John has rented an apartment in the east Village and is filming his first documentary centering on Ettie Washington. John visits Ettie in Hell¿s Kitchen, but when he arrives he finds her trapped by a fire. She manages to escape through a window and gets to he hospital, but soon the police and fire marshal arrest her believing she is a serial arsonist trying to defraud the insurance company. <P>The police know the arsonist leaves a trademark signature and enjoys his work. They want Ettie to confess, but she insists she is innocent and never took out an insurance policy. John, who has become quite fond of Ettie, begins investigating the crime, a decision which places him in danger. <P>Jeffrey Deaver, writing as William Jeffries, shows a different side of his abundant talent as he concentrates more on the characters than the action thrillers. He captures the essence of Manhattan¿s Hell¿s Kitchen inside a fast-paced suspense novel. The relationship between John and Ettie is interesting, but the ending blind sides the reader who should have known that a Deaver by any other name is still a Deaver, which means a great reading experience. <P>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2008

    Interesting...

    I usually do not read this type of book. Once in a blue moon I will read a story like this. I thought it was interesting though. If I would of known that this was the third book in a series, then I would of read them in order to kinda get a feel for the main character. I liked the authors style though. He didnt seem to be one to get way far off base.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2008

    Just okay

    This book was just okay. I actually had trouble finishing this one. The first time this has happened to me with anything Deaver has written in the past. It was pretty dry even with the action starting right off the bat it was hard to keep going. One other thing that sort of through me off was how he would write about the folks he was speaking too in the neighborhood. It was not ebonics if I can use that term this was more like slang/ebonics/silliness. It was hard to get past this stuff without laughing almost but not in a good way. Thankfully the book was actually pretty decent and it had pretty comical characters so I say 3 mainly because of all the works I have of his, this one just plain got boring for a chapter or two before picking back up.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2006

    eerily prescient

    The thing that sticks in my mind is Deaver's reflecting upon the first World Trade Center attack, and how real pros know that the way to bring the towers down is with fire. I wonder if any of the hijackers read his book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2002

    Hell's Kitchen

    I thought this was a great book. The author had great descriptions. It was a book I couldn't put down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2011

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  • Anonymous

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