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Henny
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Henny

5.0 2
by Elizabeth Rose Stanton
 

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Henny is a chick who’s just a little different from everyone else in the barn—and who learns to embrace her special gift in this whimsical and charming picture book debut from Elizabeth Rose Stanton.

Henny doesn’t look like any other chicken she knows. Instead of wings, she has arms!

Sometimes Henny likes being different—she enjoys the

Overview

Henny is a chick who’s just a little different from everyone else in the barn—and who learns to embrace her special gift in this whimsical and charming picture book debut from Elizabeth Rose Stanton.

Henny doesn’t look like any other chicken she knows. Instead of wings, she has arms!

Sometimes Henny likes being different—she enjoys the way her arms flutter like ribbons when she runs—but other times…not so much. She just can’t do things the same way as the other chickens.

But doing things the same as everyone else is overrated, as Henny comes to realize in this warmhearted story, sweetly told and illustrated with fresh, expressive artwork that celebrates the individual in everyone.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
10/21/2013
Readers will do a double take at the confident chicken who waves hello from the cover of Stanton’s debut. Instead of feathery wings, Henny has skinny pink human arms and hands. Although “Henny’s mother... loved Henny anyway,” the other farm animals stare and even chortle. Henny frets, albeit in non-chickenish ways: “She worried about being right-handed or left-handed.... She even worried about things she didn’t quite understand—like tennis elbow, and hangnails, and whether she might need deodorant.” Henny eventually discovers a talent for farm chores and starts “to imagine all the other things she could do,” from hailing a cab to flying (a plane). In gentle pencil-and-watercolor sketches on an eggshell-white ground, Stanton scatters moments of quiet humor like chicken feed—Henny tries to “fit in” with a common chicken pose, folding her arms back like wings, and she bends those same elbows when she covers her ears to dampen a rooster’s crow. It’s a somewhat facile story of difference, but Stanton’s artwork marks her as a talent worth watching. Ages 4–8. Agent: Joanna Volpe, New Leaf Literary & Media. (Jan.)
BookPage - Alice Cary
Henny, is a gentle tale [and] preschoolers will relish this saga about the pluses and minuses of being different. Stanton's watercolor and pencil illustrations wonderfully convey Henny's changing emotions in lively, understated drawings. Stanton also injects wonderful humor along the way. . .readers will cheer as Henny learns to turn her difference into an asset. Stanton turns Henny's accomplishments into a visual feast as this unusual chicken does things like balance on figure skates and swing through the air on a trapeze. Henny's journey of adjustment and empowerment is a useful lesson for young children, told in a fun, imaginative way.
Booklist
This Henny is no regular sky-is-falling chick. She has arms! (A helpful chart compares a normal chick

with Henny: wattles, yes; combs, yes; wings, uh, no.) Henny has mixed feelings about her arms. They can

flutter—but they can also drag. Should she be left-handed? Or right-handed? Should she use deodorant?

All ambivalence disappears, however, when Henny gets a taste of working on the farm. Milking cows and

feeding chicks empowers her, and she begins to consider all the other things she might be able to do,

including picking up her grain with chopsticks and combing her comb. Ultimately, all these possibilities

lead to—maybe—a career as a pilot. The plot is thin, but the premise is clever, and the execution is

hysterical. In part, this comes from Stanton’s expert depiction of Henny as fair, round, bemused, and rather

feminine (except for those long hairy arms). And in part it comes from the clever, unlikely scenarios in

which she places her heroine. The matter-of-fact tone of the text elevates the weirdness of the

juxtapositions. For those who want a little more meat on their drumstick, this does have a good message

about making the best of one’s circumstances and looking on the bright side. But mostly, it’s just funny.

— Ilene Cooper

Booklist (Starred Review) - Ilene Cooper
This Henny is no regular sky-is-falling chick. She has arms! (A helpful chart compares a normal chick with Henny: wattles, yes; combs, yes; wings, uh, no.) Henny has mixed feelings about her arms. They can flutter—but they can also drag. Should she be left-handed? Or right-handed? Should she use deodorant? All ambivalence disappears, however, when Henny gets a taste of working on the farm. Milking cows and feeding chicks empowers her, and she begins to consider all the other things she might be able to do, including picking up her grain with chopsticks and combing her comb. Ultimately, all these possibilities lead to—maybe—a career as a pilot. The plot is thin, but the premise is clever, and the execution is hysterical. In part, this comes from Stanton’s expert depiction of Henny as fair, round, bemused, and rather feminine (except for those long hairy arms). And in part it comes from the clever, unlikely scenarios in which she places her heroine. The matter-of-fact tone of the text elevates the weirdness of the juxtapositions. For those who want a little more meat on their drumstick, this does have a good message about making the best of one’s circumstances and looking on the bright side. But mostly, it’s just funny.
The Day the Crayons Quit - Drew Daywalt
“Henny is easily one of my top ten favorite kids books. It’s so quirky and clever and warm. And it cracks my kids up every time.” - Drew Daywalt, New York Times bestselling author of The Day the Crayons Quit
Starred Review Booklist
This Henny is no regular sky-is-falling chick. She has arms! (A helpful chart compares a normal chick with Henny: wattles, yes; combs, yes; wings, uh, no.) Henny has mixed feelings about her arms. They can flutter—but they can also drag. Should she be left-handed? Or right-handed? Should she use deodorant? All ambivalence disappears, however, when Henny gets a taste of working on the farm. Milking cows and feeding chicks empowers her, and she begins to consider all the other things she might be able to do, including picking up her grain with chopsticks and combing her comb. Ultimately, all these possibilities lead to—maybe—a career as a pilot. The plot is thin, but the premise is clever, and the execution is hysterical. In part, this comes from Stanton’s expert depiction of Henny as fair, round, bemused, and rather feminine (except for those long hairy arms). And in part it comes from the clever, unlikely scenarios in which she places her heroine. The matter-of-fact tone of the text elevates the weirdness of the juxtapositions. For those who want a little more meat on their drumstick, this does have a good message about making the best of one’s circumstances and looking on the bright side. But mostly, it’s just funny. — Ilene Cooper
Kirkus Reviews
2013-11-13
Henny is a chicken but with human arms. (Best not overthink the hows and whys.) She likes being different from her fellow chickens when she's climbing a tree, but she doesn't like being different when the other farm animals laugh at her. In other words, she is Everychicken. Henny's disproportionately long, spindly, pinkish human arms are particularly creepy to behold, partly due to the soft, delicate nature of the debut author/illustrator's pencil-and-watercolor illustrations. They allow her certain luxuries foreign to her species, such as hugging her mother and helping Mr. Farmer with his chores. And, somewhat unsettlingly, "She liked it when they fluttered behind her like ribbons when she ran." (Sometimes her arms are shown as boneless, sometimes not.) In time, the barnyard bird begins to imagine hailing New York taxis, ice-skating, even flying a plane. Unfortunately, there's no cohesive narrative here, mostly just abundant illustrated examples of what can be accomplished with arms and hands. As Henny worries about tennis elbow and hangnails, imagines pointing or "mak[ing] a point," plugs her ears or carries a purse, readers may stop caring what Henny can or can't do. Whether or not children find a friend in Henny, this picture book needs a storyline. (Picture book. 4-8)
Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
Much to her mother’s surprise, the chick named Henny hatched with arms. Well now, as we all know, chickens have wings, not arms. Henny’s mom is unbothered by the difference; she loves her armed-daughter just as much as she loves her other, winged chicks. For the most part, Henny likes having her arms. Being different is fine with her, although she always is last in line so the other chicks do not trip over Henny’s arms. Also, she is sad when the other animals laugh at her. She worries about being right-handed or left-handed, what to wear, and whether she’s going to get “tennis elbow” (even if she doesn’t know what that means). She tries to fit in. But, after catching an egg when it falls out of Mr. Farmer’s basket, Henny realizes all the things she can do with arms, including: help Mr. Farmer with his chores, point or make a point, twiddle her thumbs, and cross her arms. She also learns she can carry a purse and an umbrella while haling a taxi at the same time. Most importantly, she figures she just might be able to fly. This is a sweet story with amusing illustrations. It will inspire children to celebrate their differences. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan; Ages 4 to 8.
School Library Journal
12/01/2013
PreS-Gr 2—Born with skinny human arms instead of wings, Henny is one extraordinary chicken. Though her mother loves her unconditionally, Henny struggles with her peculiar appearance. She vacillates between enjoying having arms and worrying about fitting in. One day, as she follows Mr. Farmer around the farm, she catches an egg that he drops and embraces her uniqueness at last. Stanton's airy watercolor and pencil illustrations on expansive white backgrounds deftly capture the chick's range of emotions, from sadness about being teased by other animals to triumph when picturing herself flying a plane. The droll depictions of her activities, however, are somewhat unsettling-Henny milking a very confused cow, eating bugs with chopsticks, or crossing her arms are equal parts funny and uncanny. Giles Andreae's Giraffes Can't Dance (Orchard, 2001) and Mo Willems's Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed (among many others) present more developed, yet still humorous takes on the subject.—Yelena Alekseyeva-Popova, formerly at Chappaqua Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781442484368
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books
Publication date:
01/07/2014
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
465,254
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
AD320L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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What People are Saying About This

Hannah Moushabeck
Kids' Indie Next List (winter '13-'14, ages 4-8)

“Henny is a chicken like any other except for one thing: Henny was born with arms. This adorable, albeit unconventional, story of self-discovery will charm all ages.” --Hannah Moushabeck, Odyssey Bookshop, South Hadley, MA

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Rose Stanton studied art history in college and went on to earn a graduate degree in architecture at Columbia University. After working as an architect and designer, she stepped away from a professional career to raise her family. Since then, she has worked as a portrait and fine artist, designer, and scientific illustrator. She now devotes herself full time to writing and illustrating picture books for children. She lives in Seattle with her husband, two cats, and a one-eyed dog.

Elizabeth Rose Stanton studied art history in college and went on to earn a graduate degree in architecture at Columbia University. After working as an architect and designer, she stepped away from a professional career to raise her family. Since then, she has worked as a portrait and fine artist, designer, and scientific illustrator. She now devotes herself full time to writing and illustrating picture books for children. She lives in Seattle with her husband, two cats, and a one-eyed dog.

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Henny 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
This is a hilarious picture book about being unique! Henny isn&rsquo;t sure what to do with her arms &ndash; she liked them, yet she didn&rsquo;t like them. They made her different (good), and they made her different (bad). This is a wonderful story about finding yourself. Henny doesn&rsquo;t know what to do with her arms and the results are awesome! Ms. Stanton has created a wonderful story about a unique chicken with a wonderful meaning &ndash; be yourself. *NOTE* I got a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review
Anonymous More than 1 year ago