Henry and the Paper Route

( 40 )

Overview

Henry Huggins was busy picking the cover off an old golf ball one afternoon when it occurred to him that was a pretty silly thing to do. Then just as he was seized by the urge to do something really important, Scooter McCarthy tossed a folded newspaper at his feet. Suddenly Henry knew that delivering papers was exactly what he wanted to do. It was important and it made sense. Unfortunately, Henry kept getting sidetracked from his goal. When he bought four lively kittens at a rummage sale on his way to see the man...
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Henry and the Paper Route

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Overview

Henry Huggins was busy picking the cover off an old golf ball one afternoon when it occurred to him that was a pretty silly thing to do. Then just as he was seized by the urge to do something really important, Scooter McCarthy tossed a folded newspaper at his feet. Suddenly Henry knew that delivering papers was exactly what he wanted to do. It was important and it made sense. Unfortunately, Henry kept getting sidetracked from his goal. When he bought four lively kittens at a rummage sale on his way to see the man who gave out the paper routes, how could he have guessed they would crawl out of his jacket and ruin the interview? And when Henry had the longed-for job almost in his grasp, an unexpected rival appeared. How the affair was settled involves a little girl named Ramona, whose presence in Mrs. Cleary's incomparable stories always brings increased hilarity to the goings on.

Henry, the quintessential all-American boy, is seized with the urge to do something really important, and becoming a paper boy seems like just the thing. But, as usual, Henry's plans go awry, and he must get help from an unlikely source to make his paper route a success.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
When Ramona takes over, she is as wild funny as ever.
Saturday Review
This book is certain of a warm welcome.
New York Times
When Ramona takes over, she is as wild funny as ever.
Publishers Weekly
The well-loved cast of characters is all here in this Cleary classic Henry Huggins and pooch Ribsy, Beezus and her little sister Ramona the Pest. Youthful television actor Harris breathes life into the gang, and his versatility and boyish charms are on full display. In this tale of childhood ambition and ingenuity, 10-year-old Henry devises various schemes to realize his dream of starting a paper route, including an offer of free kittens for new subscriptions. Always lurking is unpredictable four-year-old Ramona. Unfortunately, she represents the narration's one trouble spot. Harris tends to overdo Ramona's voice, rendering her lines in a demanding scream-whine. She comes across as pest-like and annoying for sure, but lacking in dimension, as well. Otherwise, Harris flawlessly animates the entire neighborhood, from sweet and innocent Henry to cocky Scooter to lisping boy genius Murph. Originally written in 1957, this story may leave today's parents wistful about an era with such a carefree childhood. Kids, however, should still recognize themselves in these characters, clear as day. The audiobook also contains an insightful interview with Cleary. Ages 8-up. (July) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
The thought of any Beverly Cleary book being relegated to out-of-print status might well send chills down the spine of many a parent of school-age children. For some, befriending the likes of Ramona and Beezus Quimby and their friend Henry Huggins was just as much a part of childhood as little league practice and piano recitals. Imagining childhood without them would seem downright empty. Thanks to the clear-headed thinking of editors at HarperCollins, today's parents won't experience any such void for their own children. Half a century later, Henry and the gang are just as fresh and loveable, naughty and industrious as ever. The clean, innocent parlance of these kids might seem unrealistic to some older readers, but the universal appeal remains—Ramona is forever full of mischief, Beezus yet tortured by her annoying little sister, and Henry always looking to create something out of nothing. When Henry gets the bug to find a job, he decides a paper route is the way to go. With the help and despite the hindrance of friends and neighbors on Klickitat Street, he discovers that he is capable of earning the job and doing it well. A box full of kittens and a new neighbor who is building a robot out of old wire and scrap metal add life to this tale that embraces community, hard work, family and fun. 2001 (orig. 1957), HarperTrophy/HarperCollins, $5.95. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Karen Deans
The New York Times
“When Ramona takes over, she is as wild funny as ever.”
Saturday Review
“This book is certain of a warm welcome.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380709212
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/28/1990
  • Series: Henry Huggins Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 127,315
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 820L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

Beverly Cleary

Beverly Cleary is one of America's most popular authors. Born in McMinnville, Oregon, she lived on a farm in Yamhill until she was six and then moved to Portland. After college, as the children's librarian in Yakima, Washington, she was challenged to find stories for non-readers. She wrote her first book, Henry Huggins, inresponse to a boy's question, "Where are the books about kids like us?"

Mrs. Cleary's books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the Amercan Library Association's Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented in recognition of her lasting contribution to children's literature.

Her Dear Mr. Henshaw was awarded the 1984 John Newbery Medal, and both Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. In addition, her books have won more than thirty-five statewide awards based on the votes of her young readers. Her characters, including Henry Huggins, Ellen Tebbits, Otis Spofford, and Beezus and Ramona Quimby, as well as Ribsy, Socks, and Ralph S. Mouse, have delighted children for generations. Mrs. Cleary lives in coastal California.

Jaqueline Rogers has been a professional children's book illustrator for more than twenty years and has worked on nearly one hundred children's books.

Biography

Beverly Cleary was inadvertently doing market research for her books before she wrote them, as a young children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington. Cleary heard a lot about what kids were and weren’t responding to in literature, and she thought of her library patrons when she later sat down to write her first book.

Henry Huggins, published in 1950, was an effort to represent kids like the ones in Yakima and like the ones in her childhood neighborhood in Oregon. The bunch from Klickitat Street live in modest houses in a quiet neighborhood, but they’re busy: busy with rambunctious dogs (one Ribsy, to be precise), paper routes, robot building, school, bicycle acquisitions, and other projects. Cleary was particularly sensitive to the boys from her library days who complained that they could find nothing of interest to read – and Ralph and the Motorcycle was inspired by her son, who in fourth grade said he wanted to read about motorcycles. Fifteen years after her Henry books, Cleary would concoct the delightful story of a boy who teaches Ralph to ride his red toy motorcycle.

Cleary’s best known character, however, is a girl: Ramona Quimby, the sometimes difficult but always entertaining little sister whom Cleary follows from kindergarten to fourth grade in a series of books. Ramona is a Henry Huggins neighbor who, with her sister, got her first proper introduction in Beezus and Ramona, adding a dimension of sibling dynamics to the adventures on Klickitat Street. Cleary’s stories, so simple and so true, deftly portrayed the exasperation and exuberance of being a kid. Finally, an author seemed to understand perfectly about bossy/pesty siblings, unfair teachers, playmate politics, the joys of clubhouses and the perils of sub-mattress monsters.

Cleary is one of the rare children’s authors who has been able to engage both boys and girls on their own terms, mostly through either Henry Huggins or Ramona and Beezus. She has not limited herself to those characters, though. In 1983, she won the Newbery Medal with Dear Mr. Henshaw, the story of a boy coping with his parents’ divorce, as told through his journal entries and correspondence with his favorite author. She has also written a few books for older girls (Fifteen, The Luckiest Girl, Sister of the Bride, and Jean and Johnny) mostly focusing on first love and family relationships. A set of books for beginning readers stars four-year-old twins Jimmy and Janet.

Some of Cleary’s books – particularly her titles for young adults – may seem somewhat alien to kids whose daily lives don’t feature soda fountains, bottles of ink, or even learning cursive. Still, the author’s stories and characters stand the test of time; and she nails the basic concerns of childhood and adolescence. Her books (particularly the more modern Ramona series, which touches on the repercussions of a father’s job loss and a mother’s return to work) remain relevant classics.

Cleary has said in an essay that she wrote her two autobiographical books, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, "because I wanted to tell young readers what life was like in safer, simpler, less-prosperous times, so different from today." She has conveyed that safer, simpler era -- still fraught with its own timeless concerns -- to children in her fiction as well, more than half a century after her first books were released.

Good To Know

Word processing is not Cleary's style. She writes, "I write in longhand on yellow legal pads. Some pages turn out right the first time (hooray!), some pages I revise once or twice and some I revise half-a-dozen times. I then attack my enemy the typewriter and produce a badly typed manuscript which I take to a typist whose fingers somehow hit the right keys. No, I do not use a computer. Everybody asks."

Cleary usually starts her books on January 2.

Up until she was six, Cleary lived in Yamhill, Oregon -- a town so small it had no library. Cleary's mother took up the job of librarian, asking for books to be sent from the state branch and lending them out from a lodge room over a bank. It was, Clearly remembers, "a dingy room filled with shabby leather-covered chairs and smelling of stale cigar smoke. The books were shelved in a donated china cabinet. It was there I made the most magical discovery: There were books written especially for children!"

Cleary authored a series of tie-in books in the early 1960s for classic TV show Leave It to Beaver.

Cleary's books appear in over 20 countries in 14 languages.

Cleary's book The Luckiest Girl is based in part on her own young adulthood, when a cousin of her mother's offered to take Beverly for the summer and have her attend Chaffey Junior College in Ontario, California. Cleary went from there to the University of California at Berkeley.

The actress Sarah Polley got her start playing Ramona in the late ‘80s TV series. Says Cleary in a Q & A on her web site: “I won’t let go of the rights for television productions unless I have script approval. There have been companies that have wanted the movie rights to Ramona, but they won’t let me have script approval, and so I say no. I did have script approval for the television productions of the Ramona series…. I thought Sarah Polley was a good little actress, a real little professional.”

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Beverly Atlee Bunn (birth name)
    2. Hometown:
      Carmel, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 12, 1916
    2. Place of Birth:
      McMinnville, Oregon
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of California-Berkeley, 1938; B.A. in librarianship, University of Washington (Seattle), 1939

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One



Henry's Bargain



One Friday afternoon Henry Huggins sat on the front steps of his white house on Klickitat Street, with his dog Ribsy at his feet. He was busy trying to pick the cover off an old golf ball to see what was inside. It was not very interesting work, but it was keeping him busy until he could think of something better to do. What he really wanted, he decided, was to do something different; but how he wanted that something to be different, he did not know.

"Hi, Henry," a girl's voice called, as Henry picked away at the tough covering of the golf ball. It was Beatrice, or Beezus, as everyone called her. As usual, she was followed by her little sister Ramona, who was hopping and skipping along the sidewalk. When Ramona came to a tree, she stepped into its shadow and then jumped out suddenly.

`Hi, Beezus, Henry called hopefully. For a girl, Beezus was pretty good at thinking up interesting things to do. "What are you doing?" he asked, when the girls reached his house. He could see that Beezus had a ball of red yarn in her hands.

"Going to the store for Mother," answered Beezus, as her fingers worked at the yarn.

I mean what's that in your hands?" Henry asked.

"I'm knitting on a spool," Beezus explained.

"You take a spool and drive four nails in one end, and you take some yarn and a crochet hook -- like this. See?" Deftly she lifted loops of yarn over the nails in the spool to show Henry what she was doing.

"But what does it make?" Henry asked.

"A long piece of knitting." Beezus held up her work to show Henry a tail of knitted red yarn that came out of thehole in the center of the spool.

"But what's it good for?" Henry asked.

"I don't know," admitted Beezus, her fingers and the crochet hook flying. "But it's fun to do."

Ramona squeezed herself into the shadow of a telephone pole. Then she jumped out and looked quickly over her shoulder.

"What does she keep doing that for?" Henry asked curiously, as he picked off a large piece of the golf-ball cover. He was getting closer to the inside now.

"She's trying to get rid of her shadow," Beezus explained. I keep telling her she can't, but she keeps trying anyway. Mother read her that poem: 'I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me, and what can be the use of him is more than I can see.' She decided she didn't want a shadow tagging around after her." Beezus turned to her sister. "Come on, Ramona. Mother said not to dawdle."

"Oh, for Pete's sake," muttered Henry, as the girls left. Knitting a long red tail that wasn't good for anything, and trying to get rid of a shadow the dumb things girls did! They didn't make sense. Then he looked at the battered golf ball in his hands and the thought came to him that what be was doing didn't make much sense either. In disgust he tossed the golf ball onto the lawn.

Ribsy uncurled himself from the foot of the steps and got up to examine the golf ball. He picked it up in his teeth and trotted to the top of the driveway, where he dropped it and watched it roll down the slope to the sidewalk. just before it rolled on into the street, he raced down and caught the ball in his mouth. Then he trotted back up the driveway and dropped the ball again.

Henry watched Ribsy play with the golf ball, and he decided that this afternoon everyone -- even his dog -- was busy doing something that made no sense at all. What he wanted to do was something that made sense, something important. Something like . . . something . . . Well, he couldn't think exactly what, but something important.

"Hi, there, Henry!" A folded newspaper landed with a thump on the grass in front of Henry.

" Oh, hi, Scooter," answered Henry, glad of an excuse to talk to someone, even if it was Scooter McCarthy.

Scooter was in the seventh grade at Glenwood School, while Henry was only in the fifth. Naturally, Scooter felt pretty superior when Henry was around. Henry looked at Scooter sitting on his bicycle, with one foot against the curb and his canvas bag of Journals over his shoulders. He thought it must be fun to ride down the street tossing papers to the right and to the left, and getting paid for it.

"Say, Henry," said Scooter. "Mr. Capper -- he's in charge of all the Journal boys around here he's looking for somebody to take a route. You don't happen to know anybody around here who would like to deliver papers, do you?"

"Sure," answered Henry eagerly. "Me."' Talk about opportunity knocking! It was practically pounding on his door. A paper route was important, and Henry knew that delivering the Journal was exactly what he wanted to do. It made sense.

Scooter looked thoughtfully at Henry, who waited for him to scoff, the way he usually did at almost anything Henry said. But this time Scooter surprised Henry. He did not scoff. Instead, he said seriously, "No, I don't believe you could do it."

Henry would have felt better if Scooter had said, "You deliver papers? Ha! Big joke," or something like that. Then Henry would have known that Scooter was just talking. But to have Scooter say, "No, I don't believe you could do it. . . .

Well, Henry knew Scooter really meant it.

" What's wrong with me delivering papers?" Henry demanded. I can throw just as good as you can.

"Well, for one thing, you're not old enough," Scooter explained. "You have to be eleven to have a paper route."

"I'm practically eleven," said Henry. I have a birthday in a couple of months. Less than that, really. I feel eleven, and if you can deliver papers, I guess I could too."

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Table of Contents

1 Henry's Bargain 7
2 Henry and the Premiums 39
3 Henry's Advertisements 75
4 The Paper Drive 103
5 Henry's New Neighbor 133
6 Ramona Takes Over 158
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 40 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 41 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2012

    Awesome

    This is a great book read morn beverly clary books its the best

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 18, 2011

    eh ok

    this book was a fun read but i just wasnt feeling it

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2013

    HI

    I like beverly cleary how about you. Well i sure do she is like the awesomest author. One of her first books i ever read was mouse on the motorcycle. And then i read dear mr.henshaw. That was a really good book. And then i read mouse on the motorcycel but i only half way thourgh. I also like boxcar children my mommy gave me book one of boxcar children and then she gave me book two but i never really read it. The first book was really good

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2013

    This deserves zero

    This deserves 0 stars, but stupid barnes and noble wont let you. Horrible book. The title is totally different from the book inside. I read this to my children and my oldest daughter said " mom. Its nothing like the title." Bad book. -BookRead

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Me

    Should I get this?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Wells

    Trains his charmeleon, cyndaquil, magicarp, pikachu, pidgey, and cranidos.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Mathew

    Puh! Espeon: esp..eon! Eevee: ee..ve.e

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2013

    Matt

    Left back to Pewter City.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 25, 2013

    Hi

    Hi

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Jimmy

    *he catches it and slams his head on it repeatedly*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Jt

    Cool*sets up a target pulls out throwing and throws them all hitting the center*

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Ninco

    Sorry wifi problems. Grabs rain's hand

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    ATTENTION

    WE MOVE TO 'OLYMPUS' ALL RESULTS!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Sab

    Morning

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Shadow

    "Greetings"

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    RAIN

    Fine! I wont quit.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Eragon

    Thats what he says

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    KOBE TO RAIN

    Please dont leave....we will miss you

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    TO ALL| CAMP HAS MOVED TO

    The camp is at "ewe" all results. Not olmpus

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Carlie

    *noms on a cookie.*

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