Henry the Sailor Cat by Mary Calhoun, Erick Ingraham, Erick Ingraham |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Henry the Sailor Cat

Henry the Sailor Cat

by Mary Calhoun, Erick Ingraham
     
 

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Who says cats don't like water? A sea-going Siamese like Henry sure wouldn't miss the chance for a glorious day of sailing, not when there are dolphins and whales and ocean breezes to enjoy. Sneaking aboard a sailboat, Henry embarks on an unforgettable aquatic adventure that captures the joy of sailing and sparkles with all the adventure of the sea.

Overview

Who says cats don't like water? A sea-going Siamese like Henry sure wouldn't miss the chance for a glorious day of sailing, not when there are dolphins and whales and ocean breezes to enjoy. Sneaking aboard a sailboat, Henry embarks on an unforgettable aquatic adventure that captures the joy of sailing and sparkles with all the adventure of the sea.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book
An exciting, happy tale.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The Siamese star of High-Wire Henry goes to sea, climbs to the top of the mast, does a little whale-watching and helps rescue a man overboard. "As in other Henry outings," said PW, "the realistic artwork lends a touch of authenticity to far-fetched feline antics." Ages 5-up. (Apr.)
Children's Literature - Tammy Cullers
Everybody knows that cats and water don't mix-or do they? Henry the Siamese cat is absolutely determined not to be left behind when The Kid and The Man go on a sailing adventure. At first, the rocking motion of the boat and the warm, stuffy air of the hatch make Henry wish for dry land. When he comes on deck and breathes the brisk, fresh air, however, he is glad he has chosen to be a stowaway on the sailboat. The Man is not excited about the idea of a cat on board. Henry scampers about the deck, enjoying the peaceful rocking of the boat and the sight of dolphins frolicking in the distance. Suddenly, everything changes. The Man accidentally falls overboard. Henry's role in the dramatic rescue is complicated by his inability to communicate with The Kid. As the situation is successfully resolved, The Man realizes that his initial reaction to a "sailing cat" had been wrong. Henry was, indeed, a worthy crewmate after all. This book introduces a few sailing terms and will appeal to anyone who admires the strong, independent spirit of a cat.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-That intrepid Siamese cat, Henry, is back in another satisfying adventure. This time he is a stowaway on a small sloop that two members of his family are taking out for a sail. Once discovered, Henry proves that cats are natural sailors. He climbs the mast for a full view, spots cavorting dolphins, and watches carefully while The Man gives The Kid a lesson on coming about and stopping the boat. When the adult accidently slips overboard, it is quick-thinking Henry who leads the rescue. Ingraham's finely detailed, realistic watercolor illustrations are full of expression, and interesting perspectives make the feline's daring escapades totally believable. Seamlessly complementing the art is a text that captures the lure of sailing (``The water lapped gently, as if it was stroking the boat.'') The practices portrayed are authentic, and the exciting rescue makes this an on-the-edge-of-your-seat read-aloud.-Caroline Ward, Nassau Library System, Uniondale, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688158460
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
40
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Calhoun's first children's book, Making the Mississippi Shout, was published in 1957. Since then, she has become the award-winning author of more than fifty children's books, including A Shepherd's Gift, Flood, Cross-Country Cat, Hot-Air Henry, and other books about Henry. She and her husband live in Clark, Colorado.

Erick Ingraham's talent for drawing was encouraged by his parents and teachers starting in early childhood. His artistic mother helped him develop his appreciation of form, color, and detail in nature and art. His father brought out the practical side of his personality by explaining and showing how things work. In high school, he played both the baritone horn and the string bass, but art became his main focus once again at Kutztown State University. His favorite iflustrators include Arthur Rackham, Maxfield Parrish, Howard Pyle, N. C. wyeth, W. Heath Robinson, and Edmund Dulac.

He began calling himself an illustrator in 1974, When he received his first book contract, for Producing Your Own Power. His first children's book was Harry and Shellburt (Macmillan). Over the years he has produced ten more children's books, nine of which he illustrated for Morrow Junior Books. He has won several state awards selected by young readers, as well as an American Book Award for Porcupine Stew, and he is widely known for his work on Mary Calhoun's four beloved Henry the Cat books.

"I don't think I've ever had a stroke of genius. Maybe luck, but not genius. It's all been hard work. The brilliance comes in the writing. I am most interested in illustrating stories with strong plots. The concept should be positive and uplifting, and the setting should be wholesome, if not magical. I can tell by the second reading of a manuscript if it's going to work. I can't force that excitement. Once I find a manuscript I like, I look at it as a child would—I don't use adult skills to start the book. I get my ideas in very, very sketchy form, almost like doodling. The more time I spend on a book, the less childlike my perspective is, but I never lose that aspect, because I've already thought it all out in a childlike way.

Children's book illustrations must create a magical bridge between the fascination of the story and the actual text. I try not only to lure the child to the story for the first time but to bring the reader back again and again. I take what the text requires of me—my experience, my drawing skills-and weave it together. With clear understanding and compassion for the author's intent, I place my imagery within a realistic, well researched, and believable setting. Imagination, research, a well-thought-out arrangement, and attention to detail will continue to he integral parts of my work."

Erick Ingraham was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on December 23, 1950. He now lives in Southern New Hampshire.

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