Henry W. Longfellow; biography, anecdote[s],letters, criticism [NOOK Book]

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GENERAL CRITICISM. "T3OETRY," says Ruskin, "is the presentation to -L the imagination, in musical form, of noble grounds for the noble emotions ; " and Goethe said that art is form alone (Die Kunst ist nur Q-estaltung). If these ...
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Henry W. Longfellow; biography, anecdote[s],letters, criticism

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
GENERAL CRITICISM. "T3OETRY," says Ruskin, "is the presentation to -L the imagination, in musical form, of noble grounds for the noble emotions ; " and Goethe said that art is form alone (Die Kunst ist nur Q-estaltung). If these canons are applied to the poems of Longfellow, most of them will be found to stand the test. His poetry is musical, is imaginative, is noble. He is the moral poet, the children's poet, the people's poet. He is " everybody's poet." His poetical productions are monochromatic, monotonic ; the range of their rhythms and rhymes is narrow; but the diction is so felicitous, the sentiment so artless, the thought so pure, and the melody so perfectly sweet, that we not only do not miss the intricate harmonies and winding rhythmus of Swinburne and Tennyson, but are well pleased that the poet of the fireside should sing in his own simple way. We like to remember him as one " Whose songs gushed from his heart, As showers from the clouds of summer, Or tears from the eyelids start." The man who could write Sandalphon, The Ladder of St. Augustine, Snow-Flakes, Daybreak, The Children's Hour, Suspiria, Seaweed, The Day is Done, The Wreck of the Hesperus, The Skeleton in Armor, Excelsior, A Psalm of Life, The Old Clock on the Stairs, Paul Revere's Ride, Noel, and Morituri Salutamus, - - the man who can write such poems as these, is immortal. In accordance with the plan pursued throughout this work, the writer will give in this part the thought and criticism of various minds, thus bestowing upon the reader some portion of the pleasure experienced in a social or literary conversation. Detailed criticisms on the poet's separate volumes have already been given. INFLUENCE ON AMERICAN LITERATURE. An anonymous critic says, " To appreciate aright Mr. Longfellow'...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940017026342
  • Publisher: Akron, Ohio, The Saalfield publishing co
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 542 KB

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GENERAL CRITICISM. "T3OETRY," says Ruskin, "is the presentation to -L the imagination, in musical form, of noble grounds for the noble emotions ; " and Goethe said that art is form alone (Die Kunst ist nur Q-estaltung). If these canons are applied to the poems of Longfellow, most of them will be found to stand the test. His poetry is musical, is imaginative, is noble. He is the moral poet, the children's poet, the people's poet. He is " everybody's poet." His poetical productions are monochromatic, monotonic ; the range of their rhythms and rhymes is narrow; but the diction is so felicitous, the sentiment so artless, the thought so pure, and the melody so perfectly sweet, that we not only do not miss the intricate harmonies and winding rhythmus of Swinburne and Tennyson, but are well pleased that the poet of the fireside should sing in his own simple way. We like to remember him as one " Whose songs gushed from his heart, As showers from the clouds of summer, Or tears from the eyelids start." The man who could write Sandalphon, The Ladder of St. Augustine, Snow-Flakes, Daybreak, The Children's Hour, Suspiria, Seaweed, The Day is Done, The Wreck of the Hesperus, The Skeleton in Armor, Excelsior, A Psalm of Life, The Old Clock on the Stairs, Paul Revere's Ride, Noel, and Morituri Salutamus, - - the man who can write such poems as these, is immortal. In accordance with the plan pursued throughout this work, the writer will give in this part the thought and criticism of various minds, thus bestowing upon the reader some portion of the pleasure experienced in a social or literary conversation. Detailed criticisms on the poet's separate volumes have already been given. INFLUENCE ONAMERICAN LITERATURE. An anonymous critic says, " To appreciate aright Mr. Longfellow'...
Read More Show Less

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