Overview


An artist for over seventy years and a teacher for more than sixty, painter Henry Hensche (1901–1992) placed great emphasis in his classes on Monet's Impressionist tradition of seeing and painting color under the influence of light. Hensche taught his students to "see the light, not the object," says his biographer John Robichaux. This book reveals the basic painting philosophy and methodology of a great teacher, as expounded in his famous classes and workshops on Cape Cod. ...
See more details below
Hensche on Painting

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.99
BN.com price
(Save 13%)$6.95 List Price

Overview


An artist for over seventy years and a teacher for more than sixty, painter Henry Hensche (1901–1992) placed great emphasis in his classes on Monet's Impressionist tradition of seeing and painting color under the influence of light. Hensche taught his students to "see the light, not the object," says his biographer John Robichaux. This book reveals the basic painting philosophy and methodology of a great teacher, as expounded in his famous classes and workshops on Cape Cod.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486317618
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 5/13/2013
  • Series: Dover Art Instruction
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 874,104
  • File size: 2 MB

Table of Contents

Introduction
The Hensche Legacy
Foreword
The Notes
Making Sense
Landscape
Portrait and Figure
Seeing
Hawthorne
History
Other Painters
Afterword
About the Author
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 29, 2012

    Esoteric but thought-provoking.

    "If you are looking for painting techniques you will not get it from me," and "If there IS a Hensche Method (and there isn't) it's simple - paint the large masses of light and dark to their colour relationships in the Light Key in which they are seen." Huh? "You don't paint what you see, you paint what you've been TAUGHT to see..." This slim book comprises words obtained through personal conversations and taped interviews (mostly in 1988) by John Robichaux who reveals the basic philosophy and methodolgy of Henry Hensche. Henry was big on Hawthorne who turns out to have been his teacher. Hensche was the studio assistant to Hawthorne. The author Robichaux gives fair warning: He says when you read the words of Henry Hensche "you will not understanding everything." Much emphasis has been placed on the Light Key which is the colours an artist sees in any setting, influenced of course by the prevailing light. "Obviously, you can't see an object except as it exists in the light in which it is seen." Got that? Well yeah...but what Ron Wilson really got out of these musings is Hensche's tip "give your viewers something more than decoration. Give them something that will raise their level of vision. let them see a new beauty through your eyes." That's more like it (Ron). Hensche: "Get the Light Key and the details will take care of themselves. They are not important and eventually you will see how they make your paintings look foolish. Your paintings will look like craft paintings." Here's the bit that Ron the Reader really likes "You cannot fully develop your vision by painting in a studio all of the time. You must get outside to learn to paint correctly." Hensche wanted Hawthorne's story to be told and seemed so frustrated with everyone's lack of understanding of what Hawthorne had accomplished. Sometimes Hawthorne made students use knives to paint so that they avoided lines in nature - only a colour note touching another colour note. OK ,so after reading Hensche and Hawthorne, Ron Wilson went outside one afternoon and studied the ambiant light (the Key Light) at Cattle Point, Vancouver Island. Ron avoided lines and concentrated on the actual relationships of one colour spot to another. Done is good.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)