Her Daughter's Dream (Marta's Legacy Series #2)

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Overview

In the dramatic conclusion to the New York Times best seller Her Mother’s Hope, Francine Rivers delivers a rich and deeply moving story about the silent sorrows that can tear a family apart and the grace and forgiveness that can heal even the deepest wounds.

Growing up isn’t easy for little Carolyn Arundel. With her mother, Hildemara, quarantined to her room with tuberculosis, Carolyn forms a special bond with her oma Marta, who moves in to care for the household. But as ...

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Overview

In the dramatic conclusion to the New York Times best seller Her Mother’s Hope, Francine Rivers delivers a rich and deeply moving story about the silent sorrows that can tear a family apart and the grace and forgiveness that can heal even the deepest wounds.

Growing up isn’t easy for little Carolyn Arundel. With her mother, Hildemara, quarantined to her room with tuberculosis, Carolyn forms a special bond with her oma Marta, who moves in to care for the household. But as tensions between Hildie and Marta escalate, Carolyn believes she is to blame. When Hildie returns to work and Marta leaves, Carolyn and her brother grow up as latchkey kids in a world gripped by the fear of the Cold War.

College offers Carolyn the chance to find herself, but a family tragedy shatters her newfound independence. Rather than return home, she cuts all ties and disappears into the heady counterculture of San Francisco. When she reemerges two years later, more lost than ever, she reluctantly turns to her family to help rebuild a life for her and her own daughter, May Flower Dawn.

Just like Carolyn, May Flower Dawn develops a closer bond with her grandmother, Hildie, than with her mother, causing yet another rift between generations. But as Dawn struggles to avoid the mistakes of those who went before her, she vows that somehow she will be a bridge between the women in her family rather than the wall that separates them forever.

Spanning from the 1950s to present day, Her Daughter’s Dream is the emotional final chapter of an unforgettable family saga about the sacrifices every mother makes for her daughter—and the very nature of unconditional love. Tyndale House Publishers

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The concluding part of a multigenerational saga by Rivers (Her Mother's Hope) extends to the present day a family story that ultimately includes five generations of women. As the tale opens in the 1950s, Hildemara, a nurse, and her daughter, Carolyn, perpetuate a pattern of secret keeping, a communication failure that also characterized Hildie's relationship with her mother, the Swiss-born, ambitious Marta. The conflict and social experimentation of the 1960s draw Carolyn away from her family, and the cycle of family dysfunction repeats itself as Carolyn gives birth to and raises her own daughter, May Flower Dawn, who in her turn grows up and marries, hoping not to repeat the familial past. Rivers has written another page-turner, yet the sequel is not as successful as the earlier novel, which centered around the compelling character of Marta and took time to narrate events and make subordinate characters interesting. Nonetheless, this heartfelt and sweeping saga is as ambitious as its central matriarch and will sell well. (Sept. 14)
Library Journal
In Her Mother's Love, Rivers tells the story of Marta Schneider, a young woman who leaves her home in Switzerland to forge a new life in America. This sequel focuses on Marta's descendants. When Marta's daughter, Hilde, is quarantined with tuberculosis, Marta moves in to care for her granddaughter, Carolyn. The two form a special bond, even as tensions arise between Marta and Hilde. When a family tragedy threatens Carolyn's newfound freedom as a college student in San Francisco, she disappears for two years, returning home later with a daughter of her own, determined to help heal the deep hurt that has plagued her family for years. VERDICT Librarians new to the genre should become familiar with this popular and best-selling CF author. Her latest will appeal to those readers who like "clean" fiction with a romantic tone and well-developed characters, as well as those who enjoy family sagas.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781410430885
  • Publisher: Gale Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 10/1/2010
  • Series: Marta's Legacy Series , #2
  • Edition description: Large Print Edition
  • Pages: 783
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Francine Rivers
Francine Rivers
From 1976 to 1985, Francine Rivers had a successful writing career in the general market, and her books were awarded or nominated for numerous awards and prizes. Although raised in a religious home, Francine did not truly encounter Christ until later in life, when she was already a wife, mother of three, and an established romance novelist. Shortly after becoming a born-again Christian in 1986, Francine wrote Redeeming Love as her statement of faith.
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First Chapter

HER DAUGHTER'S DREAM


By FRANCINE RIVERS

Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2010 Francine Rivers
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4143-3409-7


Chapter One

Hildemara lay in the darkness, her nightgown damp with perspiration. Night sweats again-she should be used to them by now. Her roommate, Lydia, snored softly. Lydia had been steadily improving since she arrived six weeks ago, which only served to depress Hildemara more. Lydia had gained two pounds; Hildie lost the same amount.

Two months and still no improvement, hospital bills mounting daily, crushing Trip's dreams beneath their weight. Her husband came each afternoon. He'd looked so tired yesterday, and no wonder when he had to work full- time and then go home and take care of all her duties: laundry, cooking, seeing to Charlie's and Carolyn's needs. Hildie grieved over her children-Charlie on his own so much of the time, Carolyn being raised by an indifferent babysitter. She hadn't touched or seen her children since Trip brought her to the hospital. She missed them so much, she felt physical pain most of the time. Or was that just the mycobacterium tuberculosis consuming her lungs and decimating her body?

Pushing the covers back, Hildie went to the bathroom to rinse her face with cool water. Who was that gaunt, pale ghost staring back at her in the mirror? She studied the sharp angles, the pallor, the shadows beneath her hazel eyes, the lackluster brown color of the hair around her shoulders.

I'm dying, Lord, aren't I? I haven't enough strength to fight this disease. And now I have to face Mama's disappointment in me. She called me a coward last time. Maybe I am giving up. She cupped water in her hands and pressed her face into it. Oh, God, I love Trip so much. And Charlie and sweet little Carolyn. But I'm tired, Lord, so very tired. I'd rather die now, than linger and leave a legacy of debt.

She'd told Trip as much last week. She only wished she could die at home, rather than in a sterile hospital room twenty miles away. His face had twisted in anguish. "Don't say that. You're not going to die. You have to stop worrying about the bills. If your mother came, I could bring you home. Maybe then ..."

She'd argued. Mama wouldn't come. She'd never helped before. Mama hated the very idea of being a servant. And that's exactly what she'd be-a full-time maid and washerwoman, babysitter and cook, without pay. Hildie said she couldn't ask such a thing of Mama.

Trip called Mama anyway, and then he went down on Saturday with Charlie and Carolyn so he and Mama could talk things over. He'd come out this morning. "Your mother said yes. I'm taking a couple of days off to get things ready for her." He wanted to repaint Carolyn's room, buy a nice, comfortable bed, a new dresser and mirror, maybe a rocking chair. "Charlie and Carolyn will have the small bedroom. You and I'll be together...."

"I can't sleep with you, Trip. I need to be quarantined." She could barely absorb the news that Mama had agreed to help. "I can't be near the children." At least, she could hear them; she could see them. Mama said she'd come. Mama was moving in. Hildie trembled, taking it all in. She felt a little sick to her stomach. "I'll need a hospital bed." She gave Trip instructions about her room. No rug. A window shade rather than curtains. The simpler the room, the easier to keep sanitized. Trip looked so hopeful, it broke her heart. He leaned down to kiss her forehead before he left. "You'll be home soon."

Now, she couldn't sleep. Rather than get back into bed, Hildie sat in a chair by the window and looked out at the stars. What was it going to be like, having Mama living under her roof, taking care of her, taking care of her children, taking care of all the chores that needed to be done so Trip didn't have to do everything? Would Mama despise her for not fighting harder? Her eyes burned; her throat ached just thinking about having to lie in bed sick and helpless while Mama took over her family. She wiped tears away. Of course, Mama would do it all better than she ever could. That realization hurt even more. Mama had always managed everything. Even without Papa, the ranch ran like a well-oiled machine. Mama would fix Trip wonderful meals. Mama would be the one to give Charlie wings. Mama would probably have Carolyn reading before she turned four.

I should be grateful. She cares enough to come and help. I didn't think she did.

When the night air had cooled her, Hildie slipped beneath the covers again.

She wanted to be grateful. She would say thank you, even as she had to watch the life she loved slip away from her. She had fought hard to be free of Mama's expectations, to claim her own life and not live out her mother's impossible dreams. Even the one thing at which she'd excelled would be stripped from her before she closed her eyes for the last time.

Mama would be the nurse. Mama would carry the lantern.

Chapter Two

Carolyn was happy that Daddy let her stay with Oma Marta in Murietta until Oma was ready to move to their house. If she had gone home with him and Charlie, she would have had to go to Mrs. Haversal's across the street every day while Charlie was at school and Daddy went to work. It had been like that for a long time, ever since Mommy went away. But now, Mommy was coming home and Oma was coming to stay. It would be wonderful!

Carolyn played with the rag doll Oma had given her, while Oma packed her suitcase with clothing and a trunk with sheets, crochet-trimmed and embroidered pillowcases, two blankets, and a pink rose tea set with tiny silver spoons. Oma put the suitcase and trunk in the back of her new gray Plymouth, and then she stacked two cushions in the front seat so Carolyn could sit high up and see out the window on the long drive home. Oma even let her roll her window down so she could put her hand out and feel the air.

They pulled into the driveway just when Charlie got off the school bus. "Oma!" He came running. Oma took the front door key out from under the flowerpot on the front porch.

Everything had changed inside the house. Carolyn found her bed and dresser in Charlie's room.

A small table stood between Charlie's bed and hers. She went back to her old room and watched Oma swing her suitcase onto a new, bigger bed. The pink walls were now bright yellow, and new lacy white curtains hung over the windows. There was a big dresser with a mirror on top, a little table and lamp, and a rocking chair with flowered cushions.

"I'm going to be very comfortable here." Oma unpacked her clothes and put them away.

Oma stepped to the window and drew the white lacy curtains aside. "I'm going to have to get used to having neighbors this close." She shook her head and turned away. "I'd better get dinner started. Your daddy will be coming home soon."

"Is Mommy coming home?"

"In another day or two." Oma opened the door into the spare bedroom. "This is where she'll be." Leaving Carolyn in the bedroom doorway, Oma headed for the kitchen. Carolyn didn't like the room. It felt cold and strange without a rug on the floor and no curtains on the window, just a shade pulled down to block out the sunlight.

Carolyn came into the kitchen. "Mommy isn't going to like her room."

"It's exactly the way she wants it. Easy to keep clean."

"Mommy likes plants on the windowsill. She likes flowers in a vase." Mommy always had pictures in frames on her dresser.

"Mommy doesn't like germs." Oma peeled potatoes.

"What are germs?"

Oma chuckled. "You'll have to ask your mother."

Oma had dinner ready before Daddy came home from work. They all sat around the kitchen table. "When do you pick her up?" Oma set a pitcher of milk on the table and sat in Mommy's chair.

"Day after tomorrow."

"Plenty to be thankful for, haven't we?" When Oma stretched out her hands, Charlie took one and Carolyn the other. Daddy took their hands too so they made a circle. He hadn't said grace since Mommy went away. He spoke quietly now, calmly, said amen and sighed, a smile tugging at his lips. Oma asked questions about his work, and Daddy talked for a long time. When everyone had finished dinner, Daddy stacked the dishes, but Oma shooed him away. "You and the kids go visit or play or whatever you normally do. I'll take care of cleaning up."

Daddy took Charlie outside to play catch. Carolyn sat on the front steps and watched.

Oma handled the baths that night, Charlie first so he could do his homework. She sat on the closed toilet while Carolyn played in the bubble bath. Oma gave Daddy a book to read to them, with Carolyn on one side and Charlie on the other. When he finished, he kissed them both and sent them to bed. Oma tucked them in with prayers.

In the middle of the night, Carolyn awakened. She'd gotten used to sleeping with Oma. Charlie didn't have monsters in his room, but Carolyn worried about Oma. Crawling out of bed, she crept down the hall to her old bedroom and opened the door. Oma snored so loudly, she'd probably scared all the monsters out of the house with the noise she made. Scampering back to Charlie's room, Carolyn dove into bed. Snuggling down into the covers, she looked at Charlie sleeping on the other side of the room, thought of Mommy coming home, and went to sleep smiling.

* * *

Daddy left for work right after a breakfast of scrambled eggs, bacon, and fresh- baked biscuits. As soon as Charlie left for school, Oma tipped Carolyn's chin. "Let's go brush your hair and put it in a ponytail. What do you say?" She took Carolyn by the hand and led her into her bedroom. She patted the bed and Carolyn climbed up onto it. While Oma brushed her hair, Carolyn watched her grandmother in the mirror. She liked her white hair and tanned, wrinkled cheeks. She had warm green-brown eyes like Mommy's. Oma smiled back at her. She brushed Carolyn's long, curly blonde hair into her hand. "You look like Elise. She was my little sister, and she was very, very pretty, just like you." When all the tangles had been worked out, Oma wound a rubber band around Carolyn's hair. "There. That looks better. Don't you think?"

Carolyn looked up. "Is Mommy dying?"

Oma smiled at Carolyn. "No. Your mother is not dying." She ran her hand over Carolyn's hair. "She needs rest. That's all. Now that I'm here, she can come home and rest. You'll see your mother every day."

Carolyn didn't see the mixture of emotions in Oma's face that she had seen in Daddy's. Oma didn't look uncertain or sad. She didn't look afraid. Oma wore glasses, but behind them Carolyn saw clear, warm eyes filled with confidence.

Oma told Carolyn they were going for a ride. "I need to get to know the area, find out where things are."

"What things?"

"Grocery store, for one. You and I are going to explore!" She made it sound like a great adventure. "We're going to find a library, where we can check out enough books to last a week. And I want to stop by the church, meet the pastor. Your daddy said you haven't gone for a while, but that's going to change."

"Will Mommy go, too?"

"No. Not for a while."

Oma drove fast, pointing this way and that, while Carolyn perched on pillows, taking in the sights. "Look over there. What do you know! A cheese factory! We'll pick up some good Swiss or Gouda cheese while we're in town. And there's a bank."

Oma took her to lunch at a small café on Main Street. Carolyn ate a hot dog and drank Coke. Before heading home, Oma wanted to wander through a department store. She looked through all the kitchen gadgets and bought a few. Then they went to the grocery store, and Oma filled the big basket. "Time to head home. We want to be there when Charlie gets off the bus."

Oma pulled into the driveway just as the school bus disgorged boys and girls. "Perfect timing!" Charlie ran up the street, whooping. Oma laughed and told him he sounded like a wild Indian. She handed him a bag of groceries. "You can help unload." She gave a smaller bag to Carolyn and carried in another bag and the package from the department store.

Charlie sniffed out the package of Fig Newtons like a bloodhound, opened it, grabbed a handful, and headed out the door to find his friends. Amused, Oma shook her head. "He's like one of my Summer Bedlam boys." Oma tore brown paper from the package and opened a big white box. "Look what I found when we were out shopping." She laid out a small embroidered tablecloth and matching napkins. "You and I and Mommy are going to make high tea every afternoon. It's been years since I've done it, but I have all the recipes right here." She took a worn leather book from her purse and set it on the table. She got a dreamy look on her face. "We're going to make this a special homecoming." She glanced at her watch and suggested they sit on the porch and enjoy the sunshine.

* * *

When Daddy brought Mommy home, Oma stood, holding Carolyn's hand. Mommy climbed out of the car, waved hello, and went straight into the house. Carolyn called out to her and followed them inside, but her father blocked her. "Leave your mother alone. She's going to bed." Mommy went down the hall into the cold room with the strange bed and closed the door. When Carolyn tried to go around Daddy, he caught hold of her and turned Carolyn around. "Go play outside for a while so Oma and I can talk. Go on now." He gave her a push.

Confused, Carolyn sat on the front steps until Daddy came out. He went right past her, got back into his car, and drove away.

Oma came out onto the front porch. "Your daddy had to go back to work. You'll see him this afternoon."

"Can I see Mommy?"

"No, Liebling." She shook her head and ran her hand over Carolyn's head. "Do you want to stay out here or come inside and help me make lunch?" Carolyn followed Oma back inside.

Her mother didn't come out of her room at all that day, except to use the bathroom. And every day after that was the same way. If she saw Carolyn in the hallway, she waved her away. Mommy didn't sit at the kitchen table for dinner or with the family in the living room when they listened to Lux Radio Theater. No one except Daddy and Oma could go into Mommy's room. Daddy often spent all evening behind the closed door while Oma took a book from the pile she'd checked out of the library and read stories to Carolyn and Charlie.

Carolyn often went outside after Charlie went to school. One day she picked daffodils that had sprouted up from bulbs Mommy had planted a long time ago. Mommy loved flowers. They made her happy. When Carolyn had a fistful, she went inside, crept along the corridor to Mommy's room, and opened the door. Mommy lay on her side, sleeping. Carolyn tiptoed to the bed. She stood chin level with the top of the mattress.

"Mommy?" Reaching up, Carolyn touched her mother's hand. Her mother's eyes flickered open. A smile curved her mouth. Carolyn held up the daffodils. "I brought you flowers, Mommy, to make you feel better."

Mommy's expression changed. Pulling up the sheet, she covered her mouth. "You're not supposed to come in here, Carolyn. Go! Now!"

Her lip trembled. "I want to be with you."

"You can't be with me." Her mother's eyes filled with tears. "Get out of here, Carolyn. Do what you're told."

"Mommy ..." Carolyn reached out to give her the flowers.

Her mother reared back. "Mama!" Mommy started to cough. "Get away from me!" she choked out between coughs. When Oma appeared in the doorway, Mommy waved frantically. "Mama! Get her out of here! Get her away from me!" Sobbing now, still coughing, Mommy bunched the sheet over her mouth and hunched over. "Keep her out!"

Oma hustled Carolyn out of the room and closed the door firmly. Frightened, confused, Carolyn wailed. Oma picked her up and carried her into the living room. "Hush now! You didn't do anything wrong. Listen to me." She sat in the rocker. "Mommy's sick. You can't go in that room. If you do, she'll go away again. You don't want that, do you?"

"No." Why couldn't she go in? Oma did. Daddy did. Charlie stood in the doorway and talked to Mommy. Why did she have to stay away?

"Shhhh ..." Oma lifted Carolyn into her lap and rocked her. Carolyn stuck her thumb in her mouth and leaned against her grandmother. "Everything is going to be fine, Liebling. Your mother is going to get better. You'll have plenty of time with her then."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from HER DAUGHTER'S DREAM by FRANCINE RIVERS Copyright © 2010 by Francine Rivers. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 325 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(198)

4 Star

(64)

3 Star

(36)

2 Star

(16)

1 Star

(11)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 326 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderful conclusion!

    I have one word that sums up my overall feelings about this book. It was WONDERFUL! I really enjoyed the first book, but loved this one even more! I was so inspired as I read about how the Lord pulled each of these ladies through the hard times and I cried more than once while reading this book. Not because it was sad (though I was) but because I really cared about the characters. And honestly, even the sad feelings were a healing, rejoicing kind of sad because of the beauty that God brought forth from the ashes in their lives.

    The title of this book couldn't have been more perfect. At first I thought the daughter who had the dream was Carolyn, but it ended up being Dawn. And what a powerful story she had. I loved how realistically her struggles with Jason were portrayed. I loved how I lived in her head and in her skin for so long. I literally escaped into her world. This author is so incredibly gifted. She does a fantastic job of bringing characters to life, and having her readers join their journeys and struggles in every life-transforming story she writes.

    This is the kind of fiction I aspire to write myself. Fiction that comes alive, that brings healing, that deals with real-life, painful issues, and that shows the heart of God and the redemption of Christ. What a beautiful story! I dare say that this book ranks at the top of my favorites list for this year. I've read many great books so far in 2010, but this one stirred my heart, challenged my thinking, and encouraged my spirit the most. Wonderful, wonderful book!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 30, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Rivers is one special writer!

    Rivers is one special writer that seems to know what the world needs to read. This is another wonderful, special book about mother, daughter relationships spanning four generations. This one covers the 1950's up until today with a lot of surprises in its conclusion. This, along with her others, is full of historical detail, is so moving and heartfelt that the family saga comes alive and we can all relate. I love all of Francine River's books!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Her Daughter's Dream

    Francine Rivers

    2010

    Fiction/General

    Tyndale

    Reviewed by Cindy Loven


    Her Daughter's Dream, takes up right where Her Mother's Hope left off. Francine Rivers, has such a wonderful gift of telling a story, that it will stand alone without reading the first book, but it does help to know the story of the first book.

    Marta, now known as Oma has come to the realization that she should have done some things in her life different, perhaps a bit of kindness with Hildemara, instead of the harshness she had shown her all her life, would have improved the relationship between them. However what greatly grieves Marta is seeing the same pattern with her granddaughter Carolyn and her great granddaughter May Flower Dawn.

    The family grows up, and grieves as a grandson goes off to fight in the Vietnam War, never to return. Greater grief takes places when the only surviving child of Hildemara and Trip, disappears into the crazed drug scene of the sixties. They near grieve themselves to death, only to find that when she does come home, there are things they just don't seem able to move past. Fast forward several years and Carolyn has grown into a wonderful responsible single mother, who falls in love with an old high school friend, after much pursuing on his part, and a new family is born.

    A new family with the same struggles, as the old family had, the grandmother and daughters not bonding with their mothers. A story of struggles, hurts and dashed hopes.

    This book will keep you reading from front to back. Be prepared to have your tissues, as your heart will tear and break with the family as they loose loved ones, laugh along as they celebrate victories and milestones. I loved this new Francine Rivers books and appreciate the chance to review it. 438 pages $24.99 Hardcover 5 stars!

    Thanks to Tyndale publishing for providing this book for review.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    What a wonderful book.

    I totally enjoyed reading the second book in this series by Francine Rivers. It was very true to life and times in the 1960-1980's. The author taught how her family over came many dysfunctions and still found peace in our Lord. I had to carry tissues with me. You will too.

    I hate to put it in archive.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Highly Recommend

    What a great continuance to Her Mother's hope. I read this book in two days. Just like the first book it had me from the very beginning to the very end.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 23, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    a strong epic family drama

    In 1951 Hildemara Rose is back in the hospital suffering from tuberculosis and a fear she is dying. Her husband Trip told her mom Marta who has come to help with the children Charlie and Carolyn as well as take care of the house.

    While Hilde remains in an isolated ward with other TB victims, her daughter and her mother bond. After several months away, Hilde returns home, but is angry that her Carolyn and Oma Marta have a special connection. The tension between mother and daughter grows over the next decade plus and impacts the granddaughter who believes she is the cause and decides in 1965 college is her escape. While Charlie joins the Marines, Carolyn attends Berkley. However, a tragedy destroys Carolyn's sense of being and she flees into the counterculture. Two more years pass before she returns home to her parents with a daughter, May Flower Dawn who bonds with her grandmother. This leads to history repeating itself as a war between her mom and her grandma ignites, but Dawn plans to be the bridge not the divider between them.

    The second Marta's Legacy (see Her Mother's Hope) completes the saga with a strong epic family drama that occurs over a half of a century. The ensemble cast is fully developed so that the audience will understand motives of each individual that sometimes lead to internal strife. Although Her daughter's Dream stands alone, readers will appreciate Francine River's powerful twentieth century duology.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2014

    Epic story

    This book by Rivers is another example of a great story writer. The story is this family is sure to affect you.

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  • Posted March 14, 2014

    I love everything Francine writes, but this one really hit home

    I love everything Francine writes, but this one really hit home for me. How did she know my family this well when we've never met??? I couldn't put down either book, and was living many of the scenes while reading them... Father died of cancer, brother died, conflicts with mother, alienation from siblings, and on it goes. We haven't found the healing yet, though.

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  • Posted January 14, 2014

    This book along with the first one were a total waste of time.  

    This book along with the first one were a total waste of time.  I read for enjoyment.  I don't enjoy being 
    depressed or reading about children being mentally and sexually abused.  The characters were unlikeable.  I regret the time that I spend 
    reading these two books and don't think I will be getting any more Francine River's books. 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 22, 2013

    Highly recommended...Francine Rivers is an awesome detailed writer.

    It's a fast moving story that keeps you glued to each word.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    highly recommented

    the journey these woman took through their lives and the affect of theirs relationship through the generations gave me a lot to ponder in my own life. we are not an island to ourselves. what we do has profound consequences for future generations. i also read her mothers hope couln't put them down til i was finished

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2012

    Great book!

    One of the best!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2012

    Wonderful book by one of my favorite authors

    Wonderful book by one of my favorite authors

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  • Posted August 17, 2012

    Legacy of Love

    To be honest, I'm not really sure how to begin conveying my review of "Her Daughter's Dream". This book has impacted me in ways I never suspected it would, and I don't think anything I can say will do it justice. This is the conclusion to a multi-generation saga, bringing to light the relationships between mother and daughter and the fears that keep us from realizing the depth of our love for one another. Francine Rivers does an amazing job bringing the characters to life and gripping your heart. They go through real life circumstances; hurt, loss, despair, fear, love, tragedy, faith and joy. This is not a feel good novel about how Christians go through life with no trial or tribulations, it depicts REAL life through four generations of women. As I think back to the story, I realize how much I need to trust Him more and me less, that I need to exhibit more faith in the God who lights my path, and not use a flashlight when the Son is shining so brightly. There were times during the novel that I thought "Don't say it, don't do it! That is not a good idea". I had to laugh thinking this must be what God says every minute of every day when we say or do things without reflecting on His desires for us. We must drive Him crazy! I know I sure do. He is who sustains us. Our faith in Him is allows us to walk the streets of this wretched earth to love, be loved and share His love. I think of all the books out there that tell us what our purpose is, when in one short sentence it is our purpose to love, to have faith in Jesus Christ and to share those two things with others. Take time and read these two books. I pray that you will enjoy them as much I did and that they will place the desire for a legacy of love and faith in Jesus Christ deep into your heart and soul.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2012

    Good

    Easy reading enjoyed this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    Loved it!!!!!!!!

    This book really pulled me in and made me think about my own relationships. Great book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2012

    My favorite!

    I just read this for the second time & could not put it down! A great lesson in learning from past generations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Excellent

    This was an awesome book!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    Wonderful.

    Francine Rivers writes beautifully, and this story delivers!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    What an incredible book

    Francine Rivers did it again. This book picked up where the first one left off. Spanned generations of great grandmother, mother, grand daughter and daughter. God does work in each of their lives.

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