Her Man Friday

( 7 )

Overview

When investigator Leo Friday is sent to unravel the shady goings-on at the Kimball family mansion, he never dreamed his primary suspect would be pretty Lily Rigby, the eccentric family's social secretary. Everyone just loves Lily, and Leo can't help but notice that beneath that oh-so-sensible exterior is a passionate woman longing to break free. Leo finds Lily irresistible, trouble is, she might be filching millions of dollars from the Kimballs' overfilled coffers.

Lily Rigby ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (37) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $5.00   
  • Used (34) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$5.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(77)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1999 Mass-market paperback New. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. 384 p. Avon Light Contemporary Romances. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Chesterfield, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$5.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(77)

Condition: New
1999 Mass-market paperback New. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. 384 p. Avon Light Contemporary Romances. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Chesterfield, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$58.77
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(214)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

When investigator Leo Friday is sent to unravel the shady goings-on at the Kimball family mansion, he never dreamed his primary suspect would be pretty Lily Rigby, the eccentric family's social secretary. Everyone just loves Lily, and Leo can't help but notice that beneath that oh-so-sensible exterior is a passionate woman longing to break free. Leo finds Lily irresistible, trouble is, she might be filching millions of dollars from the Kimballs' overfilled coffers.

Lily Rigby knew from the start that Leo Friday wasn't just another accountant sent to balance the Kimball family books. First, there were all those attractive muscles, a sure sign he did more in his spare time than crunch numbers. Then there were all those pesky questions about her personal life. But when he took her in his arms and gave her the most pulse-pounding kiss of her life, Lily was almost ready to put her suspicions aside. He couldn't be on to her—could he?

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Teresa Medeiros
Elizabeth Bevarly writes with irresistible style and wit.
Library Journal
Hired by the Board of Directors of Kimball Technologies to track down the person responsible for skimming $50 million from the company's profits, PI Leo Friday discovers that the trail leads to CEO Schuyler Kimball's palatial estate. There he meets Kimball's lovely, enigmatic social secretary, Lily Rigby, who might be hiding secrets of her own. This practically perfect romance has a terrific hero and heroine who share some sexy love scenes; sparkling, witty dialog; a quirky cast of characters; and writing that is a pure joy. Bevarly My Man Pembleton, Avon, 1998 lives in Louisville, KY.--JC, SM Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Jill M. Smith
Elizabeth Bevarly really outdoes herself with this fun-filled romp. Her Man Friday utilizes Ms. Bevarly's strengths of humor and characterization to bring this wonderfully charming story to life.
Romantic Times
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380800209
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/1/1999
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 374
  • Product dimensions: 4.13 (w) x 6.85 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Bevarly wrote her first novel when she was twelve years old. It was 32 pages long — and that was with college rule notebook paper — and featured three girls named Liz, Marianne and Cheryl who explored the mysteries of a haunted house. Her friends Marianne and Cheryl proclaimed it "Brilliant! Spellbinding! Kept me up till dinnertime reading!" Those rave reviews only kindled the fire inside her to write more.

Since sixth grade, Elizabeth has gone on to complete more than 50 works of contemporary romance. Her novels regularly appear on the USA Today and Waldenbooks bestseller lists, and her last book for Avon, The Thing About Men, was a New York Times Extended List bestseller. She's been nominated for the prestigious RITA Award, has won the coveted National Readers' Choice Award, and Romantic Times magazine has seen fit to honor her with two Career Achievement Awards. There are more than seven million copies of her books in print worldwide. She resides in her native Kentucky with her husband and son, not to mention two very troubled cats.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

0h, man. A bunch of wrinkled old white guys wearing two-thousand-dollar suits. So it was going to be one of those jobs again, was it?

As he tunneled fingers through his medium brown hair, Leo Friday shifted his weight from one foot to the other, arced his gaze around the U-shaped table that surrounded him, and eyed each of his new employers one by one. But even the fact that he was standing and they were sitting did nothing to relieve his tension. First in line was Versace Man, dressed to the nines in a black pinstripe number that put Leo's faded blue jeans, white T-shirt, and black blazer to shame. Beside Versace Man was Cohiba Man, puffing with much relish on the stump of a fat cigar. Beyond him was — oh, swell — Grecian Formula Man. Did old guys really think they were kidding anybody when they used that stuff? And after that came . . . ew, Halston for Men Man, way too close for comfort. Leo did his best to breathe shallowly.

One by one, he took in the dozen or so members of the board of directors of Kimball Technologies, Inc., the pride and joy of Philadelphia's business community. And he thanked God — not for the first time — that he was self-employed and didn't have to answer to guys like these. Because guys like these definitely lived and played by a different set of rules than Leo did, rules that were doubtless engraved in twenty-four-carat gold somewhere.

Okay, he amended reluctantly, when he recalled that these guys were his newest clients, so he was technically self-employed. Unfortunately, being selfemployed meant he was also up for hire. Which meant he was pretty much answering to Kimball'sboard of directors. For now, anyway.

They'd dispensed with the initial formalities, and he'd declined the obligatory cup of coffee. Might as well get on with it. "All right," Leo said halfheartedly. "Give me the particulars."

"Someone is stealing money — a considerable amount of money — from Schuyler Kimball," Versace Man said.

Leo had to admit that as particulars went, that one was pretty substantial. "Can you be more specific?" he asked.

Versace Man shook his head. "No. That's the problem. We don't know how the money is disappearing, or from what branch of the business, or who might be doing the stealing. We only know that there should be quite a bit more money than there is. And we want you to find out where it is, and who's responsible for its disappearance."

A man halfway around the table met Leo's gaze with what the old guy probably thought was a steely glare. Unfortunately, his expression only succeeded in making the man look nearsighted. "And then," he intoned with a voice reminiscent of God's, "we want to you hang the bastard out to dry by his nuts."

Hoo-kay Leo thought. So Charlton Heston Man had checked in, had he? Aloud, he said, "That's not much to go on. I mean, Kimball Technologies is a multinational, mufti-billion-dollar corporation, with holdings in dozens of areas of industry. Couldn't you be a little more specific?"

Versace Man plucked at his perfectly knotted necktie, an accessory that had probably set him back more than Leo's poker losings for a whole year. "No. That's the problem. Whoever is doing the stealing is damned good at it. We can't locate the origin of the theft at all."

Grecian Formula Man nodded his agreement. "We only know that the annual report for Kimball Technologies just came out, and although there was a nineteen percent rise in gross earnings, total profits fall short of what they should be. It's a pattern that's been plaguing the company for a few years now-a rise in gross earnings, yet a drop in total profits. This year, however, the discrepancy is a bit too big to ignore. It's causing us some concern."

"How much is 'a bit'?" Leo asked.

The men all exchanged wary glances, as if they weren't sure how much to reveal to the very man who was supposed to uncover the alleged theft. Ultimately, they all turned their attention to Cohiba Man, who puffed once on his cigar, then cleared his throat indelicately before meeting Leo's gaze.

"More than fifty million dollars," he said.

Fifty million dollars? Leo gasped inwardly. These guys were missing fifty million dollars, but they couldn't even say from where? Just how much money was Kimball Technologies bringing in annually?

Okay, granted, Schuyler Kimball, Philadelphia's most notorious native son, was one of the world's leading billionaires. Even without doing his research on the company — and the man — before taking on his current clients, Leo knew that much about Kimball. As did nearly everyone else on the planet. And it wasn't like Leo had never been exposed to extremely large sums of money in his time. Recouping massive corporate losses was part of what he did for a living. But this . . .

This was a hell of a lot of money they were talking about. And the fact that it was only a small percentage of Kimball's annual take just made it that much more astonishing.

Leo swallowed hard, pretending he wasn't completely awestruck, and said, "More than fifty million bucks, huh? Gee, that really sucks."

Another member of the board narrowed his eyes and glared at Leo. "Yes, Mr. Friday, it does indeed . . . suck," he agreed. "It's unfortunate. Inconvenient. One might even say ruinous. But that's why we wish to utilize your preeminent faculties and aptitudes. We comprehend that you are unequaled in the business when it comes to unearthing whitecollar crime and harvesting the illicit fruits of that felonious labor."

Oh. Wonderful. Thesaurus Man, Leo decided. He shrugged off the compliment — once he understood that it was, in fact, a compliment. Hey, he was the best in the business when it came to ferreting out embezzlers, appropriators, abstracters, and outright corporate thieves. With degrees in accounting and finance, and a government background with both the government's General Accounting Office and the FBI, he'd left public service five years ago to start his own investigative agency — one that specialized in white-collar crime, particularly theft.

And boy, had he seen a boom in business, right out of the gate. Today's executives seemed to think their six-figure incomes and full medical coverage and luxury company cars and golden parachutes didn't beagin to cover their needs.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2012

    Book

    I like this story, however the editing could be much better. Really, doesn't anyone proofread anymore?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 13, 2012

    Absolutely loved

    I enjoy read Elizabeth Bevarly and this series and this book in particular are great. Good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2012

    good read!

    good read!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)