Here Come the ABC's [CD/DVD]

( 7 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Amy Barkat
They Might Be Giants' debut into the world of children's music, the kid-hit No!, featured a variety of topics and wacky lyrics, but this time, John Flansburgh and John Linnell have just one thing on their mind -- the alphabet. For a duo who have famously composed an album of songs exclusively about American states and who operated a dial-a-song service for years, the narrow focus is no hindrance. Here Come the ABC's may seek to educate about letters, but it's also an energetic, upbeat, and quirky paean to individuality. The disc opens with "Alphabet of Nations," a great alternative to the traditional recitation that also promotes an understanding of the world around us. ...
See more details below
CD (Bonus DVD)
$13.83
BN.com price
(Save 1%)$13.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $10.77   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Amy Barkat
They Might Be Giants' debut into the world of children's music, the kid-hit No!, featured a variety of topics and wacky lyrics, but this time, John Flansburgh and John Linnell have just one thing on their mind -- the alphabet. For a duo who have famously composed an album of songs exclusively about American states and who operated a dial-a-song service for years, the narrow focus is no hindrance. Here Come the ABC's may seek to educate about letters, but it's also an energetic, upbeat, and quirky paean to individuality. The disc opens with "Alphabet of Nations," a great alternative to the traditional recitation that also promotes an understanding of the world around us. "Go for G" is a frantically paced celebration of the many words that begin with titular letter and could easily be a Sesame Street outtake -- and that's no faint praise. Another twist on a classic comes from "Who Put the Alphabet in Alphabetical Order?," where a high pitched female voice sings the ABC's, old-school style. But the best track, by far, is "Pictures of Pandas Painting," an homage to alliteration that's as psychedelic as its title sounds -- parents will recall Beatles songs and college rock; kids will just think it's fun. Most songs are less than two minutes long, another bonus for teachers trying to incorporate learning into waiting for the bus, or singing between activities.They Might Be Giants leaven the work of learning with a dose of creativity that just might send reluctant young students on their way to the world of letters. There's also a companion DVD release of songs from this CD filled with animation, puppetry, live action, and pure fun -- an eclectic mix of sight and sound that is not to be missed.
All Music Guide - Heather Phares
They Might Be Giants have always had a flair for educational songs. More than a decade after its release, the refrain of "Why Does the Sun Shine" ("The sun is a mass of incandescent gas/A gigantic nuclear furnace") still has a pesky way of lodging itself in the brain. And, as the band's wonderful first children's album, No!, demonstrated, They Might Be Giants' music speaks to kids in a way that few other bands' work can; they never sound like they're talking (or singing) down to their smaller fans. Here Come the ABCs makes the most of the band's ability to teach and reach children, and more than delivers on its promise to "learn ABCs the fun way!" Since this is a more educational enterprise than No! was, Here Come the ABCs is a little more straightforward and like a traditional children's album than its predecessor. Several songs, like "E Eats Everything," are more or less recitations of the alphabet, albeit with a few twists: "Z Y X" brings the album to a close with a dramatic backwards reading of the alphabet, and "The Alphabet of Nations" is a mini-atlas, spanning Algeria to Zimbabwe. This is still a They Might Be Giants album, though, and the band's catchy melodies and smart wordplay haven't been dumbed down. "Flying V," with its charming, Vince Guaraldi-like pianos and images of migrating geese and electric guitars, is another of John Linnell's seemingly effortless but brilliant songs, and "C Is for Conifers" offers an extra-credit lesson in botany as well as the alphabet. Here Come the ABCs brings personality to the alphabet's characters, with some letters sharing songs and others getting songs of their own. The bouncy "Go for G!" is an immediate kid-pleaser, while "Q U" casts these letters as pals that "make a cool sound together" -- much like Linnell and Flansburgh themselves. F gets "Fake-Believe," a celebration of imagination so good that they had to include it on the album twice. Other songs are more conceptual: "Pictures of Pandas Painting," which is all about alliteration, lives up to its psychedelic title, while "Who Put the Alphabet in Alphabetical Order?" gets downright meta. Amidst all the learning, there's still plenty of room for plain old fun, as shown by the squiggly synths on "Letter Shapes"; the self-explanatory "Clap Your Hands"; and "Rolling O," which celebrates the joy of making silly mouth noises with scat-like babbling. Though some of the songs feel a little incomplete without the dazzling visuals of the DVD version, Here Come the ABCs is still a delight. It might be slightly less magical than No!, but it's a far cry from a by-the-numbers (or letters) children's album. [This CD/DVD version of the album contains over 50 minutes of animation, puppets, and performances (in addition to the standard audio).]
Time Magazine
This Brooklyn duo's work for adults is arty and wacky--think Spike Jones with an M.F.A. degree. And TMBG's album of alphabet songs is, well, pretty much the same. The loopy tracks--26 of 'em, of course--include the delicately pretty C Is for Conifers, the funk meltdown E Eats Everything and I C U, very likely the first-ever country ballad composed entirely of letters that sound like words ("I C U/ I C U/ N U R O K"). U R O.K. 2, TMBG.

This Brooklyn duo's work for adults is arty and wacky--think Spike Jones with an M.F.A. degree. And TMBG's album of alphabet songs is, well, pretty much the same. The loopy tracks--26 of 'em, of course--include the delicately pretty C Is for Conifers, the funk meltdown E Eats Everything and I C U, very likely the first-ever country ballad composed entirely of letters that sound like words ("I C U/ I C U/ N U R O K"). U R O.K. 2, TMBG.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/25/2005
  • Label: Walt Disney Records
  • UPC: 050086140770
  • Catalog Number: 861407
  • Sales rank: 3,300

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Here Come the Abcs (0:11)
  2. 2 Alphabet of Nations (1:26)
  3. 3 E Eats Everything (2:43)
  4. 4 Flying V (1:34)
  5. 5 Q U (1:09)
  6. 6 Go for G! (1:14)
  7. 7 Pictures of Pandas Painting (2:07)
  8. 8 D & W (1:37)
  9. 9 Fake-Believe (1:51)
  10. 10 Can You Find It? (2:55)
  11. 11 The Vowel Family (1:59)
  12. 12 Letter/Not a Letter (1:08)
  13. 13 Alphabet Lost and Found (2:49)
  14. 14 I C U (1:49)
  15. 15 Letter Shapes (1:22)
  16. 16 Who Put the Alphabet in Alphabetical Order? (1:45)
  17. 17 Rolling O (1:26)
  18. 18 L M N O (1:43)
  19. 19 C Is for Conifer (2:37)
  20. 20 Fake-Believe (Type B) (1:56)
  21. 21 D Is for Drums (2:21)
  22. 22 Z y X (1:21)
  23. 23 Goodnight My Friends (0:25)
  24. 24 Clap Your Hand (1:21)
  25. 25 Here in Higglytown (Theme to Playhouse Disney's Higglytown Heroes) (0:58)
  26. 26 Hovering Sombrero '05 (1:27)
  27. 27 I Never Go to Work (4:25)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Here Come the Abcs
  2. 2 Alphabet of Nations
  3. 3 E Eats Everything
  4. 4 Flying V
  5. 5 I Am a Robot
  6. 6 Q U
  7. 7 Go for G!
  8. 8 Pictures of Pandas Painting
  9. 9 D & W
  10. 10 Fake-Believe
  11. 11 Can You Find It?
  12. 12 Introducing the Vowel Family
  13. 13 The Vowel Family
  14. 14 A to Z
  15. 15 Letter/Not a Letter
  16. 16 Latter Shapes
  17. 17 Alphabet Lost and Found
  18. 18 I C U
  19. 19 I Am a Robot (Type B)
  20. 20 John and John Introduce...
  21. 21 Who Put the Alphabet in Alphabetical Order?
  22. 22 Rolling O
  23. 23 L M N O
  24. 24 Introducing C Is for Conifers
  25. 25 Fake-Believe (Type B)
  26. 26 A to Z (Type B)
  27. 27 D Is for Drums
  28. 28 Introducing Z y X
  29. 29 Z y X
  30. 30 Goodnight My Friends
  31. 31 Here Come the Abcs!
  32. 32 Introducing the Bonus Tracks
  33. 33 Clap Your Hands
  34. 34 Violin
  35. 35 Stalk of Wheat
  36. 36 Robot Parade
  37. 37 Sleepwalker
  38. 38 Here in Higglytown (Theme to Playhouse Disney's Higglytown Heroes) ...
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
They Might Be Giants Primary Artist
Don Miller Guitar
Marty Beller Drums, Vocals
Patrick Dillett Keyboards
John Flansburgh Group Member
Dan Hickey Drums
Dan Levine Trombone, Tuba
John Linnell Group Member
Danny Weinkauf Bass
Robin "Goldie" Goldwasser Voices
Desi Tomaselli Voices
Technical Credits
They Might Be Giants Composer
Marty Beller Composer
Dave Conrad Authoring
Patrick Dillett Producer, Engineer
Ted Kryczko Authoring
David Agnew Executive Producer
UE Nastasi Mastering
Rolf Conant Logo
Samm Potts Logo
Divya Srinivasan Illustrations
Anaheed Alani Copy Editing
Jamie Lincoln Kitman Management
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 10, 2014

    This is the best kids video and music ever.

    This is the best kids video and music ever.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Fun to listen to and not the typical kids music sounds

    My son, husband and I enjoy listening to this CD and though it has been a few months not one of us is tired of the CD. The songs are different from what you might typically expect from a children's CD but they are still fun and entertaining. They are appropriate for young children.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Great CD/DVD combo

    My 3 year old son absolutely loves it, and I get a kick out of it too. We like to watch the video at home, and listen to the music in the car too. They Might Be Giants are a very entertaining group, and this DVD portion, flashes the letters that they sing about, so it can help children with letter recognition.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Absolutely amazing!!!

    Having been a teen/early 20 something listening to TMBG I was thrilled to see they had produced some products for children. Within a week of listening/watching my son who is not quite 3 had memorized most of the songs - and was recognizing letters outside of the DVD! My husband and I love the music as well and went ahead and purchased 123's! I would actually recommend this for any age group because the music itself is wonderful! I would not call it relaxing though, this is fun music!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews