Here Come the Girl Scouts!: The Amazing All-True Story of Juliette

Here Come the Girl Scouts!: The Amazing All-True Story of Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low and Her Great Adventure

4.0 1
by Shana Corey, Hadley Hooper
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


The amazing, all-true story of the first Girl Scouts and their visionary founder.

Juliette Gordon Low--Daisy to her friends and family--was not like most girls of the Victorian era.

Prim and proper?

BOSH!

Dainty and delicate?

HOW BORING!

She loved the outdoors, and she yearned for adventure! Born into a family of pathfinders and pioneers, she too

Overview


The amazing, all-true story of the first Girl Scouts and their visionary founder.

Juliette Gordon Low--Daisy to her friends and family--was not like most girls of the Victorian era.

Prim and proper?

BOSH!

Dainty and delicate?

HOW BORING!

She loved the outdoors, and she yearned for adventure! Born into a family of pathfinders and pioneers, she too wanted to make a difference in the world--and nothing would stop her.

Combining her ancestors’ passion for service with her own adventurous spirit and her belief that girls could do anything, she founded the Girl Scouts. One hundred years later, they continue to have adventures, do good deeds, and make a difference!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Corey’s (Mermaid Queen) enthusiastic celebration of the life of Low, founder of the Girl Scouts, reveals a gutsy, active girl growing up in Savannah, Ga., at a time when “proper young ladies were supposed to be dainty and delicate.” Low craved “adventure and excitement,” and, as an adult, she traveled extensively and decided that she “wanted to be useful, to make a difference in the world.” Inspired by Boy Scouts and Girl Guides in England, she launched the Girl Scouts and, at an inaugural meeting, told the girls what to expect: “They’d hike and camp and swim! They’d do good deeds. They’d learn to tie knots and survive in the wilderness and even save lives!” Corey’s gung-ho prose conveys Low’s gumption and optimism, and copious quotations from the first Girl Scout handbook impart commonsense tenets for living and scouting (“Whatever you take up, do it with all your might”). Subdued blues, greens, and browns underscore the Scouts’ outdoor focus in newcomer Hooper’s folksy mixed-media art, which, much like Corey’s prose, portrays the Scouts and their history in a fresh, unstuffy manner. Ages 4�8. Agent: Adams Literary. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

"Deft storyteller Shana Corey knows that good history writers pick rich details to paint a life story. That’s exactly what she does in ‘Here Come the Girl Scouts!’.” —The New York Times

*"Corey tells Low’s story with few words, but a lot of energy. This is an exuberant celebration of Low’s work just in time for the Girl Scouts 100th anniversary.” —School Library Journal, starred review

"Corey’s gung-ho prose conveys Low’s gumption and optimism. Hooper’s folksy mixed-media art, much like Corey’s prose, portrays the Scouts and their history in a fresh, unstuffy manner.”—Publishers Weekly

“Girl power, all the way around.”—Booklist

“Captivating. Well done, all around. So, sit down with your favorite box of Do-si-dos (or, OK, Thin Mints, if that’s your style) and be sure to experience this one.”—Kirkus blog review

Did You Know These Amazing Facts about the Girl Scouts?

* There are more than 3.2 million Girl Scouts throughout the world!
*More than 50 million American women enjoyed Girl Scouting during their childhoods.
* March 2012 marks the 100th Anniversary of the Girl Scouts.

"Deft storyteller Shana Corey knows that good history writers pick rich details to paint a life story. That’s exactly what she does in ‘Here Come the Girl Scouts!’.” —The New York Times

*"Corey tells Low’s story with few words, but a lot of energy. This is an exuberant celebration of Low’s work just in time for the Girl Scouts 100th anniversary.” —School Library Journal, starred review

"Corey’s gung-ho prose conveys Low’s gumption and optimism. Hooper’s folksy mixed-media art, much like Corey’s prose, portrays the Scouts and their history in a fresh, unstuffy manner.”—Publishers Weekly

“Girl power, all the way around.”—Booklist

“Captivating. Well done, all around. So, sit down with your favorite box of Do-si-dos (or, OK, Thin Mints, if that’s your style) and be sure to experience this one.”—Kirkus blog review 

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
I was a Brownie and a Girl Scout, but I never gave much thought as to the origins of scouting and those involved. Shana Corey tells the story through the Girls Scouts founder Juliette Gordon Low who was known by her nickname Daisy. To start with Daisy was not your ordinary docile Victorian girl. She was a girl with gumption. When she was old enough, she went and traveled even though she lost most of her hearing due to an ear infection. She flew an airplane, rode an elephant and learned how to be a blacksmith. While in England she learned about the Boy Scouts and the Girl Guides and she wondered why there could not be the same activity for girls in the U.S. So back she went to Savannah and with the help of her cousin, just about one hundred years ago on March 12, 1912, the first girls were invited to a Girl Scout meeting. These girls would have adventures—bike, camp, swim and even learn how to survive in the wilderness. Not everyone was happy that girls were being introduced to such activities, but Daisy was undeterred. She had formulated the ten Girls Scout Laws, compiled a handbook with Professor Hoxie, and developed merit badges. She was not content to just have Girls Scouts in Savannah; she wanted them in America, everywhere and for everyone. She believed that girls could do anything and there is a wonderful spread showing some very famous women who were former Girl Scouts. The illustrations have a whimsical look and reminded me of sketches from fashion magazines. They are delightful and make this biography really come alive. The closing pages offer factual information about Daisy and the Girl Scouts and don't miss the facts and quotes on the back cover. Corey and Hooper have created an inspiring and informative book—girls will want to get out there and join the nearest Girls Scout troop. While the publisher has given a young age the text might be too challenging for a 5 year-old, but the story when read aloud will certainly be of interest to those ages 5 to 100. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
Gr 2�4—This picture-book biography tells the story of Juliette (Daisy) Gordon, a proper Southern girl who was vivacious, active, and loved the outdoors. After she married William Mackay Low, she traveled to England and met Agnes Baden-Powell, the sister of the founder of the Boy Scouts. She was impressed with Baden-Powell's efforts to start a female scouting program and brought the idea back to America. She started the first Girl Scout unit in Savannah, GA, in 1912 and the organization quickly spread across the nation. Corey tells Low's story with few words, but a lot of energy. The text is informal and typeset with a variety of fonts and colors. Quotations from the first Girl Scout manual on nearly every page emphasize the "can do" spirit of the organization. A more extensive account of Low's life and work, along with a short bibliography, is appended. Hooper's illustrations suggest the time period and reflect the liveliness of the narration. The characters are drawn with bold, simple strokes and the predominant colors—dusty blue, sepia, apple green, and brick red—reinforce the nostalgic feel. This is an exuberant celebration of Low's work just in time for the Girl Scouts' 100th anniversary. For a more extensive history, Fern Brown's Daisy and the Girl Scouts (Albert Whitman, 1996) is a little dry, but full of information.—Donna Cardon, Provo City Library, UT

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545342780
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2012
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
236,572
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author


Shana Corey has the unique ability to make history accessible and fun, a talent that has been praised in all of her celebrated picture books, including MERMAID QUEEN, illustrated by Edwin Fotheringham and YOU FORGOT YOUR SKIRT, AMELIA BLOOMER!, illustrated by Chesley McLaren, which was named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year and an Orbis Pictus Recommended Title. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Hadley Hooper is an editorial artist whose work appears regularly in The New York Times. HERE COME THE GIRL SCOUTS! is her first picture book. She lives in Denver, Colorado.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Here Come the Girl Scouts!: The Amazing All-True Story of Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low and Her Great Adventure 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this to my first grade Daisy troop and they loved it! They were fascinated by the different activities Girl Scouts used to do, like milking cows and skinning sardines, and the idea that one hundred years ago some people didn't think girls should even play outside. Great "girls can do anything" message.