×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Here Comes Hortense!
     

Here Comes Hortense!

5.0 1
by Heather Hartt-Sussman, Georgia Graham (Illustrator)
 

The feisty, irrepressible Nana we met in Nana’s Getting Married is back. And what could be more fun for a six-year-old than having your nana and her new husband take you to a theme park? But the fun is spoiled when Nana and Bob announce that they’ve planned a surprise: they are going to be joined by Bob’s granddaughter, Hortense.

Overview

The feisty, irrepressible Nana we met in Nana’s Getting Married is back. And what could be more fun for a six-year-old than having your nana and her new husband take you to a theme park? But the fun is spoiled when Nana and Bob announce that they’ve planned a surprise: they are going to be joined by Bob’s granddaughter, Hortense. It turns out to be the worst surprise ever. Nana shares her room with Hortense instead of her disgruntled little grandson. She sings her special good-night song to Hortense. She goes on all the scary rides with Hortense. And, worst of all, Hortense has a special name for Nana.
 
A perceptive and hilarious exploration of rivalry, there’s a gentle lesson for readers, young and old.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes a trip to WonderWorld, which provides a neurotic grandson with more opportunities to worry about his relationship with his beloved Nana. In this sequel to Nana’s Getting Married, Nana’s six-year-old grandson gets a surprise during his trip to an amusement park with Nana and her new husband, Bob—Bob’s granddaughter, Hortense. Hortense and Nana are like two peas in a pod—unlike the timid narrator, both love scary rides like the Mix Master and the Flume—and it isn’t until the boy realizes that Hortense shares some of his fears that they reconcile. Graham’s exaggerated chalk pastels feature a lurid carnival palette and in-your-face characterizations, providing a comedic balance to the boy’s pained emotional state. Ages 4–7. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
 “…Hartt-Sussman's narrative touch is deft. Graham's chalk pastels, a wacky delight from start to finish, bring appropriate lift to what could be a melancholy story. Her characters are uniquely quirky yet have a streak of photographic realism. Warm and offbeat.”
—Kirkus Reviews
 
“…Georgia Graham’s artwork is truly delightful…. The drawings suit the story so well and are complemented with large bold text in many strategic places…. The results are playful, quirky, colourful and action-packed artwork!”
—Highly Recommended, CM Magazine

“In a well told story, Hartt-Sussman gently captures all the feelings of jealousy and exclusion as well as the very real love between grandparents and grandchildren (and between Bob and Nana) and brings it to a satisfying conclusion.”
Canadian Children’s Book News

“Graham’s exaggerated chalk pastels feature a lurid carnival palette and in-your-face characterizations, providing a comedic balance to the boy’s pained emotional state.”
Publishers Weekly

Children's Literature - Tima Murrell
A "Nana stealer" is not a good surprise. A little boy is excited about spending time with his Nana and her husband, Bob, at the amusement park. But when their surprise turns out to be Bob's granddaughter, Hortense, the boy finds out that not all surprises are good ones. Hortense is spending too much time with his Nana and he experiences some jealousy. But he finds a friend in Bob, whom he begins to call Gramps. When he finally talks to Hortense he realizes that they can share their grandparents and the surprise turns into a good one. This sweet and touching story illuminates jealousy, love, sharing, and misunderstanding for young readers. The reasons for rivalry and jealousy are not always valid as this story clearly illustrates. The author does a great job of telling the story from the child's perspective. The illustrations are hilarious and add another dimension to the story. Reviewer: Tima Murrell
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—The challenges of blended families, jealousy, and feeling left out are realistically depicted in this well-told story. A boy's trip to WonderWorld with his grandmother and her husband seems ruined when Bob's granddaughter Hortense joins them and hogs Nana's attention. Resolution comes, somewhat abruptly, when the kids discuss their grandparents and bond over their shared opinion of the Tunnel of Love ride ("Gross!"). The resolution, while sudden, is believable. The chalk pastel illustrations vibrate with energy; they are exaggerated but very expressive, and the messy feelings of the protagonist seem mirrored by the crazy, busy, sort-of-grotesque art. In this modern world with its many family compositions, a unique story touching on remarried grandparents will certainly find its audience. The characters set a good example for readers by discussing their feelings.—Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL
Kirkus Reviews
With Nana, every trip is an adventure, and sometimes a lesson. Nana and her new husband, Bob, drive up in their bright orange van. They're planning to take the unnamed young narrator to WonderWorld, where he rides the mild Teacups while Nana favors the Wild Mouse. Mostly, he just craves some time alone with Nana. But the duo has another surprise for him: Bob's granddaughter Hortense, who is about his age and as adventurous as Nana. While Nana and Hortense ride the Landslide and the Mixmaster, the downcast lad mostly sits on a bench with Bob. "This is turning out to be the worst surprise ever!" Late that night, with Hortense and Nana in one room and him and Bob in another, he's hoping that Bob will sing "Lavender's Blue" to him like Nana does, but Bob falls quickly into a deep, snoring sleep. The next day starts on the same dark note but takes an abrupt turn when Hortense and the little boy begin talking, and she shares an identical disappointment at having little time with Bob. The two children forge a new friendship. Hartt-Sussman's narrative touch is deft. Graham's chalk pastels, a wacky delight from start to finish, bring appropriate lift to what could be a melancholy story. Her characters are uniquely quirky yet have a streak of photographic realism. Warm and offbeat. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492219
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
04/10/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Heather Hartt-Sussman was born in Montreal, graduated from Brandeis University, and attended the Sorbonne. She has been a copywriter for BCP in Montreal, a reporter and an associate international editor for the Hollywood Reporter, editor-in-chief of international news for TV Guide in French Canada, where she also had a popular column, “Heather Hartt in Hollywood” for five years. Heather Hartt-Sussman lives in Toronto with her husband, sons Scotty and Jack, and the family dog.
 
Georgia Graham, born and raised in Calgary, began using artwork to entertain children in her Sunday school class. She has illustrated numerous children’s books, including Wanda and the Wild Hair, Wanda and the Frogs, and Wanda’s Freckles by Barbara Azore. Georgia also illustrated Nana’s Getting Married, the first in the series, written by Heather Hartt-Sussman. The Lime Green Secret, which she wrote and illustrated, was published to critical acclaim. Georgia Graham lives on a tree farm in central Alberta with her husband and dog, Ginger.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Here Comes Hortense! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
tmurrell2 More than 1 year ago
A little boy is excited to spend some time with his Nana and her husband Bob at the amusement park. But when their “surprise” turns out to be Bob’s granddaughter Hortense, he finds out that not all surprises are good ones. Hortense is spending too much time with his Nana and he experiences some jealousy. But he finds a friend in Bob who he begins to call Gramps. After talking to Hortense he realizes that they can share their grandparents and the surprise turns into a good one. This story was sweet and touching. It brought jealousy, love, sharing, and misunderstanding to the young reader’s mind. The reasons for rivalry are not always valid if the situation is considered from another perspective. The author did a great job of telling the story from the child’s perspective and with realistic feelings. The illustrations were hilarious and added such a funny element to the story. My children really enjoyed reading this book and looking at the detailed pictures. I received this book free of charge from Children's Literature in exchange for my honest review.