Here Comes Jack Frost

Here Comes Jack Frost

4.6 3
by Kazuno Kohara
     
 

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One cold morning a lonely boy wishes for something to do. His animal friends are hibernating, and he has nobody to play with--even all the birds have flown south. When he meets Jack Frost, the last thing he expects is to make a new friend . . . or to discover how enchanting winter can be!

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Overview

One cold morning a lonely boy wishes for something to do. His animal friends are hibernating, and he has nobody to play with--even all the birds have flown south. When he meets Jack Frost, the last thing he expects is to make a new friend . . . or to discover how enchanting winter can be!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
“Never mention anything warm in front of me...” Jack Frost, a spiky elfin creature, tells his new friend, a boy whose winter doldrums are interrupted by the sprightly figure's arrival. “That would break the spell and force me to leave.” The boy agrees, and he and Jack Frost scamper off across the spreads of this celebration of winter magic. Kohara's (Ghosts in the House!) sharp-edged white silhouettes suggest the crisp ice-cold of winter, but midnight blue backgrounds pale as they near the horizon like old Japanese woodblock prints, softening and adding depth. Jack Frost's challenges (“You can't catch me! You can't jump over the pond!”) are easily met: the boy sails effortlessly with eyes closed to where the sprite waits on the far side, while the boy's hound, wearing skates as well, pirouettes. In an especially lovely scene, Jack, the boy and the dog build three snowmen with features that echo their own. Jack's a wonderful playmate, and only when the boy discovers a snowdrop does their idyll end. The book ends with a promise: “See you next winter!” A sparkling winter treat. Ages 3–6. (Oct.)
Kirkus Reviews
Gorgeous prints illuminate an unusual friendship. The first few spreads are rendered in black and dull blue, as a little boy mopes inside with his dog: "I hate winter." But when he sees "strange patterns [appear] on his window," he's lured outside into a gorgeous white-and-blue fairyland, courtesy of Jack Frost, a spiky creature with elf shoes. After an initial period of suspicion, they play together all winter, with Jack Frost's warning never to "mention anything warm in front of [him]" hanging in the air. This outing partakes of the striking visual sense of Kohara's award-wining Ghosts in the House (2008), but it is almost entirely lacking in the earlier book's whimsy of story and play of illustrations against text. Probably most disappointing is the entirely unmagical explanation of Jack Frost's magic-too bad. (Picture book. 3-5)
From the Publisher
“The simple linocut illustrations are stunning; with white figures on a blue background, they create an idealized wintry world.”—Bloomberg.com

“The simple lines and crisp images, especially of spiky Jack Frost, pop and are a delight for the eyes. . . . This is a beautiful piece of bookmaking.”—School Library Journal

“A sparkling winter treat.”—Publishers Weekly

“The artful design is what will draw repeat viewers, young and old, who’ll be taken with the pictures’ evocative feel.”—Booklist

“As in Ghosts in the House!, the limited-palette illustrations are composed of the simplest shapes and lines, here enhanced with swirls of motion (check out Jack’s shoes), mottled-background snowfall, and a few perfectly formed snowflakes.”—The Horn Book

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596434424
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
10/27/2009
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
921,234
Product dimensions:
10.06(w) x 10.02(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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