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Here, My Dear
     

Here, My Dear

5.0 3
by Marvin Gaye
 

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Pre-dating the voyeuristic tendencies of reality television by 20 years, Here, My Dear is the sound of divorce on record -- exposed in all of its tender-nerve glory for the world to consume. During the amazing success of I Want You and his stellar Live at the London Palladium album, Marvin Gaye was served with divorce

Overview

Pre-dating the voyeuristic tendencies of reality television by 20 years, Here, My Dear is the sound of divorce on record -- exposed in all of its tender-nerve glory for the world to consume. During the amazing success of I Want You and his stellar Live at the London Palladium album, Marvin Gaye was served with divorce papers from his then-wife Anna Gordy Gaye (sister of Motown Records founder Berry Gordy). One of the conditions of the settlement was that Gordy Gaye would receive an extensive percentage of royalties as well as a portion of the advance for his next album. Initially, Gaye was contemplating giving less than his best effort, as he wouldn't stand to receive any money, but then reconsidered at the last moment. The result is a two-disc-long confessional on the deterioration of their marriage; starting from the opening notes of the title track, Gaye viciously cuts with every lyric deeper into an explanation of why the relationship died the way it did. Gaye uses the album, right down to its packaging, to exorcise his personal demons with subtle visual digs and less-than-subtle lyrical attacks. The inner sleeve had a pseudo-board-game-like illustration entitled "Judgment," in which a man's hand passes a record to a woman's. One side of the sleeve has Gaye's music and recording equipment, while the other side of the board included jewelry and other luxurious amenities. Musically the album retains the high standards Gaye set in the early '70s, but you can hear the agonizing strain of recent events in his voice, to the point where even several vocal overdubs can't save his delivery. Stripped to its bare essence, Here, My Dear is no less than brilliantly unsettling and a perfect cauterization to a decade filled with personal turmoil.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/05/1994
Label:
Motown
UPC:
0737463631020
catalogNumber:
6310
Rank:
11667

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Marvin Gaye   Primary Artist,Synthesizer,Drums,Keyboards,Vocals,Background Vocals
Charles Owens   Tenor Saxophone
Wally Ali   Guitar
Gordon Banks   Guitar
Frank Blair   Bass
Elmira Collins   Percussion
Ernie Fields   Alto Saxophone
Fernando Harkness   Tenor Saxophone
Gary Jones   Percussion
Charles Owen   Tenor Saxophone
Nolan Andrew Smith   Trumpet
Bugsy Wilcox   Drums
Wali Ali   Guitar

Technical Credits

Marvin Gaye   Arranger,Producer
Candace Bond   Executive Reissue Producer
Tony Houston   Engineer
Cary E. Mansfield   Reissue Producer
Bill Ravencraft   Engineer
Fred Ross   Engineer
Art Stewart   Engineer
Ed Townsend   Producer
David Ritz   Liner Notes
Delta Ashby   Producer
Dana Smart   Reissue Coordinator
Tony N. Todaro   Reissue Design
Michael Bryant   Illustrations

Customer Reviews

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Here, My Dear 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you didn't hear the pain and suffering that Marvin went through in this album, you didn't hear Marvin Gaye's soul. The conflicts in his head were set to music, the rest just wrote itself. Powerful agnst ridden and pure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If Soul Music gets its name from a heartfelt expression of joy and pain, ''Here My Dear,'' is clearly its ultimate expression. Gaye's mix of doo-wop, r&b and experimental funk is legendary as a recording of lost love, recorded during his contentious divorce trial. One can hear him crying into the microphone. But, oh what crying. The melodies are tight, the overdubbing of Gaye backing up Gaye are otherworldly intricate and his voice, expressed inat least four different modes has never sounded so good. This is soul singing at it's purist, done by Marvin at his best. Some reviewers have mysteriously faulted Marvin for not being fair to his wife. What artist - what human being is ever fair about heartbreak? We're not concerned about him telling an objective account, we're mesmerized by a journey deep into the heart of a mastersinger. When he sings/screams the simple line, ''Anna - ANNAAA!'' on ''Anna's Song,'' you know you are witnessing the essence of soul music.