Heretics of Dune [NOOK Book]

Overview

With more than ten million copies sold, Frank Herbert's magnificent Dune books stand among the major achievements of the human imagination. In this, the fifth and most spectacular Dune book of all, the planet Arrakis--now called Rakis--is becoming desert again. The Lost Ones are returning home from the far reaches of space. The great sandworms are dying. And the children of Dune's children awaken from empire ...
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Heretics of Dune

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Overview

With more than ten million copies sold, Frank Herbert's magnificent Dune books stand among the major achievements of the human imagination. In this, the fifth and most spectacular Dune book of all, the planet Arrakis--now called Rakis--is becoming desert again. The Lost Ones are returning home from the far reaches of space. The great sandworms are dying. And the children of Dune's children awaken from empire as from a dream, wielding the new power of a heresy called love...

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"A monumental piece of imaginative architecture... indisputably magical."
-Los Angeles Herald Examiner

"Gripping...Fascinating detail, yet cloaked in mystery and mysticism."
-Milwaukee Journal

"Herbert weaves together several fascinating storylines with almost the same mastery as informed Dune, and keeps the reader intent on the next revelation or twist."
-Challenging Destiny

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440619649
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 8/15/1987
  • Series: Dune , #5
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 35,095
  • File size: 657 KB

Meet the Author

Frank Herbert was born in Tacoma, Washington, and educated at the University of Washington, Seattle. He worked a wide variety of jobs--including TV cameraman, radio commentator, oyster diver, jungle survival instructor, lay analyst, creative writing teacher, reporter and editor of several West Coast newspapers--before becoming a full-time writer. He died in 1986.
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 73 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(39)

4 Star

(23)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 73 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 11, 2010

    A must for Dune fans

    Heretics of Dune has more action than the previous book in the Dune series, if that is what you are looking for. My interest in this book, however, is inm the follow up to Leto II's incredible sacrifice--the continuation of his "Golden Path". In saving humanity from itself, Leto had to bring the civilization to a standstill until the creation of a human who could fade from precient awareness. Now in this book, 1500 years later, we see the rteturn of the peoples who scattered--the murderous Honored Matres. Where did they originate? Why are they so viscious? This is only the first book to tackle that question--and the conclusion of the series.

    Never has there been a more complex creation-with incredible philosophical insight to human nature and individual deep awareness-in a fictional epic. Leto II himself is probably the most complex fictional character ever created.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Recommended Dune Book Read

    This installment in the Dune saga is a new beginning for humanity as the Bene Gesserit continues on the God Emperor's Golden Path. The Bene Gesserit, spared by the God Emperor Leto II continues to struggle from within its own between Mother Superior Taraza and Reverend Mother Darwi. The Scattering has brought the threat of the Honored Matres who are as much like Bene Gesserits but are also just as much different. The Master Tleilaxu Waff gets himself caught between the two in his struggle to get out from under their controlling hand. The on-going theme of the ghola Duncan Idaho mating with the descendants of the Atriedes line continues with this young boy who is awakened to all his previous past lives and memories. The Tleilaxu may have a surprise waiting inside this ghola along with the training of Miles Teg that'll make him a force of his own. 1,500 years after the reign of the God Emperor, 'Heretics of Dune' is the beginning of the end of the planet we readers have come to love as Arrakis, but it is also the beginning of a much bigger space opera, as humanity struggles to survive.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Heretics of Dune, the Dune Chronicles, Book 5

    Personally, I felt this novel was too long and too slow paced for my liking. However, it deals mainly with the Bene Gesserit, which I like a lot. They raise another Duncan ghola from a small boy, while keeping a watchful eye on Sheeana on Rakis. The Bene Gesserit are threatened by the return of the Honored Matres from the Scattering, and the secret the Tleilaxu have put in the new Duncan ghola. I did like the character Miles Teg, and his amazing Mentat abilities. His involvement help to keep some of the story interesting and to move along. I don't mean this as a bad thing, but the best was the last few chapters of the book were things really start to unfold. ( I would recommend this book as a first time read of the Dune series.)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2002

    BENE GESSERIT RULE!

    What would happen if a Bene Gesserit turned evil? We get a terrifying glimpse of their power when the Honored Matres come burning and murdering back into the "Old Empire". The brutal Honored Matres enslave their populations with terror and addictive sex. The Bene Gesserit Sisterhood watch in horror as their precious planets are destroyed one by one as the Honored Matres search for their Chapterhouse. The great Bashar Miles Teg is called back into service to help defend the Sisterhood from the chaos. The mysterious Bene Theilax scheme for domination of the galaxy, the ancient priesthood on Dune are invaded by the new and far more dangerous Face Dancers. In this Dune Chronicle, the Bene Gesserit and their amazing powers are fully explored and threated with extinction. An exciting and imaginative addition to the Dune pantheon. Heretics and Chapterhouse are by far my favorites. Like I said, BENE GESSERIT RULE!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2013

    Dune Saga continues

    Having found Dune after the mini-series, and Children of Dune; comparisons of the movies with the actual book story, places it all into perspective.
    An example is the sequence where Paul faces the Reverend Mother, you actually understand what is going through his mind as he inserts his hand into the box, what is racing through his mind, all of the emotions, and feelings.
    Frank Herbert wrote a great series, his son continues the saga.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2007

    The plot has many holes

    This book was a huge letdown after reading the others in the series. Quite often, Herbert skips important details. For instance, near the end, a mentat stages an assault on a ship. The chapter ends with him getting ready the assault, the next page has him already on Dune. That is a BIG detail left out. Herbert was also lewder, and sometimes it felt like he was being lewd just for being lewd. The story is solid, the execution is flawed. Still, you must read it if you are a Dune fan.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2006

    Best since the original

    The original Dune was probably the best in the whole series, but this one comes close. I'm a big fan of the series, but I'll admit there is still a lot of philosophy about society in the books that are had to understand. The first Dune had a lot of action and some of this confusing wordplay. The next books began to fall in action and add more and more philisophy, which isnt all that bad. God Emperor of Dune was a good book, and necessary in order to read this book, but it failed to incorporate the exciting moments of Dune. Heretics of Dune brings back all the action and surprises, while still including the Herbert's constant themes of Dune. I couldn't put it down, there was so many cool, intense events. One of the best, a must read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2004

    One of My Favorites

    If you've found yourself struggling through any of the books following the first, Heretics of Dune will most definitely rekindle your interest in the series. The characters have all of the same depth, complexity, deviousness and ingenuity as the characters from 'Dune'. Herbert reveals, for the first time, the unexpected inner workings of the enigmatic Tleilaxu. The novel's pacing is much better than that of the others in the series (except the original), and the plot takes many unpredictable and trecherous turns. The confrontations between the Honored Matres and the Tleilaxu were completely engrossing, and I couldn't put the book down. This is one of the few Science Fiction novels that I plan on reading again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2003

    Great

    Loved this book. Slow at the beginning, but it picks up and never quits until the end. Lots of twists and turns make it a great book. I wish I had Miles Teg's doubled vision.

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