Hernando De Soto And The Indians Of Florida

Overview

"An important achievement. Hudson and Milanich have collaborated on determining the route of de Soto in Florida for several years and this book represents their current conclusions. . . . The world became whole five hundred years ago and Florida was at center stage."--Dan F. Morse, University of Arkansas and Arkansas State University Hernando de Soto, the Spanish conquistador, is legendary in the United States today: counties, cars, caverns, shopping malls, and bridges all bear his name. This work explains the historical importance of his

... See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (11) from $29.90   
  • New (4) from $49.76   
  • Used (7) from $29.90   
Sending request ...

Overview

"An important achievement. Hudson and Milanich have collaborated on determining the route of de Soto in Florida for several years and this book represents their current conclusions. . . . The world became whole five hundred years ago and Florida was at center stage."--Dan F. Morse, University of Arkansas and Arkansas State University Hernando de Soto, the Spanish conquistador, is legendary in the United States today: counties, cars, caverns, shopping malls, and bridges all bear his name. This work explains the historical importance of his expedition, an incredible journey that began at Tampa Bay in 1539 and ended in Arkansas in 1543.
   De Soto's exploration, the first European penetration of eastern North America, preceded a demographic disaster for the aboriginal peoples in the region. Old World diseases, perhaps introduced by the de Soto expedition and certainly by other Europeans in the 16th and 17th centuries, killed many thousands of Indians. By the middle of the 18th century only a few remained alive.
   The de Soto narratives provide the first European account of many of these Indian societies as they were at the time of European contact. This work interprets these and other 16th century accounts in the light of new archaeological information, resulting in a more comprehensive view of the native peoples.
   Matching de Soto's route and camps to sites where artifacts from the de Soto era have been found, the authors reconstruct his route in Florida and at the same time clarify questions about the social geography and political relationships of the Florida Indians. They link names once known only from documents (e.g., the Uzita, who occupied territory at the de Soto landing site, and the Aguacaleyquen of north peninsular Florida) to actual archaeological remains and sites.
   Peering through the mists of centuries, Milanich and Hudson enlarge the picture of native groups of Florida at the point of European contact, allowing historians and anthropologists to conceive of these peoples in a new fashion.
Jerald T. Milanich is curator of archaeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville. He is coeditor of First Encounters: Spanish Exploration in the Caribbean and the United States, 1492-1570 (UPF, 1989) and cocurator of the "First Encounters" exhibit that has traveled to major museums throughout the United States. He is the author or editor of a number of other books, including Florida Archaeology.
Charles Hudson is professor of anthropology at the University of Georgia. He is the author or editor of nine books, including The Southeastern Indians, The Juan Pardo Expeditions, and Four Centuries of Southern Indians. In 1992 he was awarded the James Mooney Award from the Southern Anthropology Society.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Spurred by a State of Florida effort to establish the route of Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto through the state in 1539-1540, Milanich and Hudson not only reconstruct his route but examine the social geography of the natives he and other Spaniards encountered and often decimated. The detailed narrative is highly technical, as the authors weigh disputed issues regarding de Soto, such as the sites of his landing harbor and his initial camp, and the location of the province of Ocale, which de Soto sought for its riches. The authors examine narratives from both de Soto and later European observers to gain insight about the Florida Indians both within and outside his route; their findings are presented as mini-histories rather than as overarching themes. Milanich is curator of archeology at the Florida Museum of Natural History; Hudson is professor of anthropology at the University of Georgia. Photos not seen by PW. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Hernando de Soto's expedition of 1539-42 was the first significant European exploration of what was to become the eastern United States. The exact route of this tortuous journey has long been the subject of heated debate. The authors of this history, both academics and experts on Southeastern Indians, offer a persuasive and perhaps definitive reconstruction of the Florida portion based upon the ``best fit'' of a variety of data-gathering techniques. They combine their analysis of the route together with narrative accounts and new archaeological evidence to create a detailed ``social geography'' of Florida's now extinct native peoples. This title is a significant scholarly work, highly recommended for academic libraries. A popular account of de Soto and his exploits is Miguel Albronoz's Hernando de Soto ( LJ 9/1/86).-- William F. Young, SUNY at Albany Lib.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813011707
  • Publisher: University Press of Florida
  • Publication date: 1/1/1993
  • Series: Columbus Quincentenary Series
  • Pages: 312
  • Lexile: 1400L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures
Preface
Acknowledgments
I The Search 3
Reconstructing the Route 7
II Prelude to the Expedition 19
Hernando de Soto, Conquistador 26
De Soto's Charter 28
III The Landing 39
The Harbor 39
The landing and the Camp 48
Archaeological Evidence 61
IV North to Ocale 71
The Location of Urriparacoxi 73
The River of Mocoso 76
Front the River of Mocoso to Ocale 81
The Crossing of the Swamp and River of Ocale 87
Ocale 91
Acuera 96
Archaeology in the Cove of the Withlacoochee and Ocale 98
V Native Peoples of Southern and Central Florida 111
The Tequesta of Southeast Florida 114
The Calusa of Southwest Florida 117
Indians of the Tampa Bay Region 121
Inland Native Groups 127
Archaeological Correlations 129
VI Ocale to Agile 133
To the River of Discords 134
Trails and Sites in North Florida 148
Aguacaleyquen 154
To the River of the Deer 158
Agile 166
VII Native Peoples of Northern Florida 169
Potano 170
Northern Utina: Aguacaleyquen, Uriutina, Napituca 177
Uzachile/Yustaga 183
Eastern Utina and the St. Johns River 186
Saturiwa and Other Northeast Florida Indians 205
VIII To Apalachee 211
The March to Iniahica 212
Winter Camp 216
The Governor Martin Archaeological Site 222
The Apalachee 226
North from Apalachee 230
IX After De Soto: Spain in Sixteenth- And Seventeenth-Century La Florida 237
More Failed Settlements: Luna and Villafane 237
Menendez, St. Augustine, and Santa Elena 241
The Mission System 243
Timucuan Missions 245
Apalachee Missions 248
Demise of the Missions 250
Afterword 255
Notes 259
Bibliography 263
Index 281
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)