Hero, Captain, and Stranger: Male Friendship, Social Critique, and Literary Form in the Sea Novels of Herman Melville

Hero, Captain, and Stranger: Male Friendship, Social Critique, and Literary Form in the Sea Novels of Herman Melville

by Robert K. Martin
     
 

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A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

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Overview

A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"No other writer on Melville has written so candidly and fully and convincingly on the centrality of male bonding and same-sex love in Melville's work. Robert Martin is the only critic to trace the theme with such thoroughness. Moreover, he handles the subject with the subtlety it requires."—James E. Miller, Jr., University of Chicago

"With a daring worthy of Melville's daring, and a power of discrimination worthy of his daring, Martin has broken fertile new ground and put Melville scholarship deeply in his debt."—Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807841464
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Edition description:
1
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.12(h) x 0.37(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
No other writer on Melville has written so candidly and fully and convincingly on the centrality of male bonding and same-sex love in Melville's work. Robert Martin is the only critic to trace the theme with such thoroughness. Moreover, he handles the subject with the subtlety it requires.--James E. Miller, Jr., University of Chicago

With a daring worthy of Melville's daring, and a power of discrimination worthy of his daring, Martin has broken fertile new ground and put Melville scholarship deeply in his debt.--Review

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