The Heroine

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Overview

Very little can now be added to this obituary notice, which appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine for April, 1820. The young Irishman whose death it records was born at Cork in 1786, received his education chiefly in London, addicted himself to the law, and was early diverted into the profession of letters, which he practised with great energy and versatility. Besides the works mentioned above, he wrote a serio-comic romance called The Rising Sun, and a farcical comedy, full of noise and bustle, called My Wife, ...
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The Heroine

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Overview

Very little can now be added to this obituary notice, which appeared in the Gentleman's Magazine for April, 1820. The young Irishman whose death it records was born at Cork in 1786, received his education chiefly in London, addicted himself to the law, and was early diverted into the profession of letters, which he practised with great energy and versatility. Besides the works mentioned above, he wrote a serio-comic romance called The Rising Sun, and a farcical comedy, full of noise and bustle, called My Wife, What Wife? The choice of this last phrase (sacred, if any words in poetry are sacred) for the title of a rollicking farce indicates a certain bluntness of sensibility in the author. He was young, and fell head over ears in love with cleverness; he was a law-student, and took to political satire as a duck takes to the rain; he was an Irishman, and found himself the master of a happy Irish wit, clean, quick, and dainty, but no ways searching or profound. At the back of all his satire there lies a simple social creed, which he accepts from the middle-class code of his own time, and does not question. The two of his works which achieved something like fame, Woman, a Poem, and The Heroine, here reprinted, set forth that creed, describing the ideal heroine in verse, and warning her, in prose, against the extravagances that so easily beset her. The mode in female character has somewhat changed since George was king, and the pensive coyness set up as a model in the poem seems to a modern reader almost as affected as the vagaries described in the novel. Yet the poem has all the interest and brilliancy of an old fashion-plate. Here is woman as she wished to be in the days of the Regency, or perhaps as man wished her to be, for it is impossible to say which began it. Both gloried in the contrast of their habits. If man, in that age of the prize-ring and the press-gang, was pre-eminently a drinking, swearing, fighting animal, his indelicacy was redeemed by the shrinking graces of his mate.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781290713498
  • Publisher: HardPress Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/1/2012
  • Pages: 326
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Read an Excerpt


THE HEROINE TO THE READER. 4 Attend, gentle and intelligent reader; for I am not the fictitious personage whose memoirs you will peruse in " The Heroine;" but I am a corporeal being, and an inhabitant of another world. Know, that the moment a mortal manuscript is written in a legible hand, and the word End or Finis annexed thereto, whatever characters happen to be sketched in it (whether imaginary, biographical, or historical), acquire the quality of creating and effusing a sentient soul . or spirit, which ' instantly takes flight, and ascends through the regions of air, till it arrives at the Moon ; where it is then embodied,, and becomes a living creature: the precise counterpart, in mind and person, of its literary prototype. Know farther, that all the towns, vil. lages, rivers, hills, and vallies of the moon, owe their origin, in a similar manner, to the descriptions which writers give of those on earth; and that all the lunar trades and manufactures, fleets and coins, stays for men, and boots for ladies, receive form and substance here, from terrestrial books on war and commerce, pamphlets on bullion, and fashionable magazines. Works consisting of abstract argument, ethics, metaphysics, polemics,
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    Have you seen the herobrine

    Roams the world in the default skin.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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