Heroism by Ralph Waldo Emerson | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Heroism

Heroism

by Ralph Waldo Emerson
     
 

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This book is a rare 1906 version of Heroism by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Contemporary literature is bereft of models of heroism, according to Emerson. To find examples of true heroism, he says, one must read the historical portraits of Plutarch. These "Lives" challenge the "despondency and cowardice of our religious and political theorists," Emerson declares. The

Overview

This book is a rare 1906 version of Heroism by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Contemporary literature is bereft of models of heroism, according to Emerson. To find examples of true heroism, he says, one must read the historical portraits of Plutarch. These "Lives" challenge the "despondency and cowardice of our religious and political theorists," Emerson declares. The essence of heroism is self confidence and its defining characteristic is persistency. Viewed from the standpoint of prudence, heroism often appears "ragged and dangerous," but the individual as well as society require that a man be acquainted with the means and ends of warfare and have the courage to stand up to the mob by "the absolute truth of his speech and the rectitude of his behavior".

Heroism is the product of a supremely balanced mind combined with an unwavering determination to do the right thing, according to Emerson. Therefore, heroism is an extreme expression of individuality.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014839518
Publisher:
Balefire Publishing
Publication date:
08/07/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
28
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet, who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay, Nature. Following this ground-breaking work, he gave a speech entitled The American Scholar in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. considered to be America's "Intellectual Declaration of Independence".

Emerson wrote on a number of subjects, never espousing fixed philosophical tenets, but developing certain ideas such as individuality, freedom, the ability for humankind to realize almost anything, and the relationship between the soul and the surrounding world. Emerson's "nature" was more philosophical than naturalistic; "Philosophically considered, the universe is composed of Nature and the Soul."

Emerson's work has greatly influenced the thinkers, writers and poets that have followed him. When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was "the infinitude of the private man." Emerson is also well known as a mentor and friend of fellow Transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau.

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