Herpetology / Edition 3

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$39.17
(Save 75%)
Est. Return Date: 11/18/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$105.02
(Save 33%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $36.80
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 76%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $36.80   
  • Used (12) from $36.80   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 12 (2 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$36.80
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(5607)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Acceptable
Blue Cloud Books ??? Hot deals from the land of the sun.

Ships from: Phoenix, AZ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.81
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(3412)

Condition: Good
Ships same day or next business day! UPS expedited shipping available (Priority Mail for AK/HI/APO/PO Boxes). Used sticker & some writing and/or highlighting. Used books may not ... include working access code or dust jacket Read more Show Less

Ships from: Columbia, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$38.69
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(7)

Condition: Acceptable
2003 Hardcover Fair Item is intact, but may show shelf wear. Pages may include notes and highlighting. May or may not include supplemental or companion material. Access codes ... may or may not work. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer service is our top priority. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Dallas, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$39.34
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(49362)

Condition: Very Good
Ships same day or next business day via UPS (Priority Mail for AK/HI/APO/PO Boxes)! Used sticker and some writing and/or highlighting. Used books may not include working access ... code or dust jacket. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Columbia, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$40.27
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(7)

Condition: Good
2003 Hardcover Good 078 Item may show signs of shelf wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. Includes supplemental or companion materials if applicable. Access ... codes may or may not work. Connecting readers since 1972. Customer service is our top priority. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Dallas, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$42.47
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(91)

Condition: Acceptable
2003 Hardcover Fair BOOK ONLY-no supplemental materials included. Covers show heavy wear. Pages show heavy marking/ highlighting. THIS ITEM IS OVERSIZED. PLEASE, NO ... INTERNATIONAL ORDERS. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Kernersville, NC

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$48.00
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(457)

Condition: Good
Edition: 3, Hardcover, Fast shipping! Access codes and CDs are not guaranteed with used books!

Ships from: Little Rock, AR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$74.66
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(898)

Condition: Very Good
Excellent Condition. No wear/tear. Please contact us if you have any Questions.

Ships from: Downingtown, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$100.00
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(185)

Condition: Very Good
Hardcover Very Good 0131008498 Book is warped, no markings or highlighting in book. Used books may not include companion materials, cdrom or access codes.

Ships from: Salem, OR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$101.75
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(179)

Condition: Good
2003 Hardcover Good

Ships from: Tallahassee, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 12 (2 pages)
Close
Sort by

Overview

This book presents the biology of amphibians and reptiles as the product of phylogenetic history and environmental influences acting in both ecological and evolutionary time. Coverage includes reproduction; communication; feeding; temperature and water relations; body support and locomotion; and energetics and performance. Curators, Managers, Public Information Officers in zoos and museums, management staff in state and federal wildlife departments, Reference Librarians in public and private conservation organizations.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131008496
  • Publisher: Benjamin Cummings
  • Publication date: 7/10/2003
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 736
  • Product dimensions: 8.24 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 1.13 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Amphibians and reptiles are successful organisms, and their ectothermal approach to terrestrial vertebrate life is quite different from the endothermal lifestyle of birds and mammals. The internal processes of ectotherms differ in many respects from the corresponding processes in endotherms, and amphibians and reptiles function differently from birds and mammals in communities and ecosystems. Understanding how and why amphibians and reptiles differ from birds and mammals enriches a biological education, and the study of herpetology is a great deal more than just the study of amphibians and reptiles.

In our view, understanding amphibians and reptiles as organisms requires a perspective that integrates their morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology and places that information in a phylogenetic context. This book does that—it presents the biology of amphibians and reptiles as the product of phylogenetic history and environmental influences acting in both ecological and evolutionary time. We emphasize how amphibians and reptiles function in the broadest sense. For example, ectothermal temperature regulation is reflected in nearly every aspect of the biology of amphibians and reptiles, from their body shapes (extremely small body size and elongate body shape are feasible only for ectotherms) to their role in ecosystems (low-energy flow and high-conversion efficiency are the result of ectothermy).

We have emphasized the integration of information from different biological specialties to produce a picture of amphibians and reptiles as animals that do remarkable things and play important roles in modern ecosystems. Evolution provides the context in which the distinctive characteristics of amphibians and reptiles must be evaluated, and both ancestral and derived features are central to understanding their biology. Throughout the book we have emphasized the use of phylogenetic information to understand the evolution of ecological, behavioral, and physiological characters. This edition of Herpetology reflects both the rate of new developments in the discipline and the continuing contributions of colleagues who have suggested ways to expand and strengthen our treatment of the biology of amphibians and reptiles. The increasing use of cladistic techniques and the incorporation of more kinds of data in phylogenetic analyses have substantially changed our understanding of the history and content of some groups. Those changes are conspicuous in the chapters covering systematics and in the integration of phylogenetic information with studies of natural history. The addition of color photographs of many species provides a far better impression of the appearance of the animals and enhances the presentation of phenomena such as aposematic coloration and mimicry that lose much of their impact in blackand-white photographs.

In response to suggestions from colleagues and students, we have added a chapter on biogeography to illustrate the important contributions that studies of amphibians and reptiles have made to this area and the insights about the ecology and evolution of extant species that only a biogeographic perspective can provide. Splitting the treatment of reproduction and life history into separate chapters—devoted to amphibians and to reptiles—has allowed us to respond to requests that we increase the amount of information about these important topics, and emphasize the major differences between the groups. And the expanded treatment of conservation in this edition reflects the importance this topic is assuming in many herpetology courses as habitat destruction, pollution, and disease exact an ever-increasing toll on the diversity of amphibians and reptiles. Collaboration by the six authors—whose research specializations include autecology, synecology, systematics, evolution, morphology, physiology, and behavior—has produced a treatment that interweaves these areas. We find the interrelationships among different levels of biological organization fascinating and have tried to build students' understanding of these relationships from chapter to chapter. In the case of lizards, for example, one or more aspects of the intricate correlations among phylogeny, foraging mode, diet, morphology, exercise physiology, predator avoidance, social system, and reproductive mode is discussed in nearly every chapter. We have used this technique of building topics in the hope that students will find the complex relationships that emerge intellectually stimulating. Above all, this book is the product of the lifelong fascination each of us has felt for the animals we study. We hope we will succeed in conveying this sense of excitement to our readers.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

I. WHAT ARE AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES?

1. Herpetology as a Field of Study.

The Diversity of Amphibians and Reptiles. Shared Characters of Amphibians and Reptiles. Amphibians and Reptiles in Terrestrial Ecosystems. Development of Herpetology as a Field of Study. The Future of Amphibians and Reptiles. Summary.

2. The Place of Amphibians and Reptiles in Vertebrate Evolution.

Phylogenetic Systematics. The Transition from fishes to Tetrapods. The Ecological Transition in Tetrapod Origins. Monophyly of Lissamphibia. Two Hypotheses for Relations between Lissamphibians and Paleozoic Amphibians. Paedomorphosis in Lissamphibian Evolution. Relationships among Extant Orders of Lissamphibia. The Radiation of Amniotes. Summary.

3. Systematics and Diversity of Extant Amphibians.

Salamanders (Urodela or Caudata). Systematics and Phylogeny of Salamanders. Caecilians (Gymnophiona). Systematics and Phylogeny of Caecilians. Frogs (Anura). Systematics and Phylogeny of Frogs. Summary.

4. Systematics and Diversity of Extant Reptiles.

Turtles (Testudines or Chelonia). Systematics and Phylogeny of Turtles. Lepidosauria. Tuatara (Rhynchocephalia). Lizards and Snakes (Squamata). Systematics and Phylogeny of Lizards. Snakes (Serpentes). Systematics and Phylogeny of Snakes. Archosauria: Crocodilians (Crocodylia). Systematics and Phylogeny of Crocodilians. Summary.

5. The Biogeography of Amphibians and Reptiles.

The Nature and Scope of Biogeography. Biogeographic Processes and Analysis. The Geophysical Context for Historical Biogeography. Continental Fragmentation and the Biogeography of Amphibians and Reptiles. Some Island Patterns. Merging Faunas: North and South America, the Great American Interchange, and the West Indies. Generating Diversity: Salamanders and Frogs on Tropical Mountains. Regional Phylogeography. Summary.

II. HOW DO THEY WORK?

6. Temperature and Water Relations.

Pathways of Energy and Water Exchange. Water Uptake and Loss. Water in the Lives of Amphibians and Reptiles. Heat Gain and Loss. Behavioral Aspects of Thermoregulation. Cardiovascular Control of Heating and Cooling. The Thermal Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles. Freezing Resistance and Freezing Tolerance. Evolution of Thermal and Evaporative Characteristics. Summary.

7. Energetics and Performance.

Sites of Gas Exchange. Patterns of Blood Flow. Functions of Intracardiac Shunts. ATP Synthesis: Oxidative and Glycolytic Metabolism. Energy Costs of Natural Activities. Annual Energy Budgets. Environmental Variables and Performance. Performance and Fitness. Trade-Offs. Summary.

8. Reproduction and Life Histories of Amphibians.

Sex Determination. Reproductive Cycles. Modes of Fertilization. Hybridogenesis and Gynogenetic Reproduction. Reproductive Modes. Evolution of Direct Development and Live-Bearing. Evolution of Parental Care. Egg Size and Clutch Size. Larval Development, Complex Life Cycles, and Metamorphosis. Paedomorphosis. Summary.

9. Reproduction and Life Histories of Reptiles.

Sexual and Asexual Reproduction. Sex Determination. Reproductive Cycles. Reproductive Modes, Gametes, and Fertilization. Eggs, Embryonic Development, and the Physiological Ecology of Eggs and Embryos. Parental Care. Viviparity. Life-History Variation. Summary.

10. Body Support and Locomotion.

Body Support, Thrust, and Gait. Lever Systems. Terrestrial Locomotion with Limbs. Jumping. Terrestrial Limbless Locomotion. Aquatic Locomotion. Burrowing. Climbing. Aerial Locomotion. Summary.

11. Feeding.

Suction and Suspension Feeding. Terrestrial Feeding Mechanisms. Cranial Kinesis. Envenomation. Pit Organ. Herbivory. Summary.

III. WHAT DO THEY DO?

12. Movements and Orientation.

Ecological Consequences of Movement. Methods for Studying Movements. Types of Movement. Local Movements and home Range. Territoriality. Migration. Movement of Juveniles. Homing Behavior. Mechanisms of Orientation. Summary.

13. Communication.

Modes of Communication. Constraints on Signal production. Communication and Noise. Communication by Salamanders. Communication by Anurans. Communication by Turtles. Communication by Crocodilians. Communication by Lepidosaurs. Summary.

14. Mating Systems and Sexual Selection.

The Relationship of Mating Systems and Sexual Selection. Mating Systems of Amphibians and Reptiles. Variables Affecting Male Reproductive Success. Patterns of Sexual Size Dimorphism. Summary.

15. Diets, Foraging, and Interactions with Parasites and Predators.

Diets. Amphibians and Reptiles as Predators. Interactions with Parasites. Interactions with Predators. Coevolution of Predators and Prey. Summary.

16. Species Assemblages.

Gradients in Species Richness. Determinants of Assemblage Structure and Composition. Case Studies of Amphibian and Reptiles Assemblages. Summary.

IV. WHAT ARE THEIR PROSPECTS FOR SURVIVAL?

17. Conservation and the Future of Amphibians and Reptiles.

Conservation Biology. Major Themes. Human Perceptions of Amphibians and Reptiles. Impact of Humans on Amphibians and Reptiles. Patterns of Species Extinction and Extirpation. Conservation Options. Declining Amphibians: A Model Issue. Summary.

Bibliography.
Illustration Credits.
Author Index.
Subject Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Amphibians and reptiles are successful organisms, and their ectothermal approach to terrestrial vertebrate life is quite different from the endothermal lifestyle of birds and mammals. The internal processes of ectotherms differ in many respects from the corresponding processes in endotherms, and amphibians and reptiles function differently from birds and mammals in communities and ecosystems. Understanding how and why amphibians and reptiles differ from birds and mammals enriches a biological education, and the study of herpetology is a great deal more than just the study of amphibians and reptiles.

In our view, understanding amphibians and reptiles as organisms requires a perspective that integrates their morphology, physiology, behavior, and ecology and places that information in a phylogenetic context. This book does that—it presents the biology of amphibians and reptiles as the product of phylogenetic history and environmental influences acting in both ecological and evolutionary time. We emphasize how amphibians and reptiles function in the broadest sense. For example, ectothermal temperature regulation is reflected in nearly every aspect of the biology of amphibians and reptiles, from their body shapes (extremely small body size and elongate body shape are feasible only for ectotherms) to their role in ecosystems (low-energy flow and high-conversion efficiency are the result of ectothermy).

We have emphasized the integration of information from different biological specialties to produce a picture of amphibians and reptiles as animals that do remarkable things and play important roles in modern ecosystems. Evolution provides the context in which the distinctive characteristics of amphibians and reptiles must be evaluated, and both ancestral and derived features are central to understanding their biology. Throughout the book we have emphasized the use of phylogenetic information to understand the evolution of ecological, behavioral, and physiological characters. This edition of Herpetology reflects both the rate of new developments in the discipline and the continuing contributions of colleagues who have suggested ways to expand and strengthen our treatment of the biology of amphibians and reptiles. The increasing use of cladistic techniques and the incorporation of more kinds of data in phylogenetic analyses have substantially changed our understanding of the history and content of some groups. Those changes are conspicuous in the chapters covering systematics and in the integration of phylogenetic information with studies of natural history. The addition of color photographs of many species provides a far better impression of the appearance of the animals and enhances the presentation of phenomena such as aposematic coloration and mimicry that lose much of their impact in blackand-white photographs.

In response to suggestions from colleagues and students, we have added a chapter on biogeography to illustrate the important contributions that studies of amphibians and reptiles have made to this area and the insights about the ecology and evolution of extant species that only a biogeographic perspective can provide. Splitting the treatment of reproduction and life history into separate chapters—devoted to amphibians and to reptiles—has allowed us to respond to requests that we increase the amount of information about these important topics, and emphasize the major differences between the groups. And the expanded treatment of conservation in this edition reflects the importance this topic is assuming in many herpetology courses as habitat destruction, pollution, and disease exact an ever-increasing toll on the diversity of amphibians and reptiles. Collaboration by the six authors—whose research specializations include autecology, synecology, systematics, evolution, morphology, physiology, and behavior—has produced a treatment that interweaves these areas. We find the interrelationships among different levels of biological organization fascinating and have tried to build students' understanding of these relationships from chapter to chapter. In the case of lizards, for example, one or more aspects of the intricate correlations among phylogeny, foraging mode, diet, morphology, exercise physiology, predator avoidance, social system, and reproductive mode is discussed in nearly every chapter. We have used this technique of building topics in the hope that students will find the complex relationships that emerge intellectually stimulating. Above all, this book is the product of the lifelong fascination each of us has felt for the animals we study. We hope we will succeed in conveying this sense of excitement to our readers.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)