Hey, Al

( 13 )

Overview

Transported to an island of ease and luxury, Al and his dog come to find that the grass can be a little too green on the other side.

A city janitor and his treasured canine companion are transported by a large colorful bird to an island in the sky, where their comfortable paradise existence threatens to turn them into birds as well.

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Overview

Transported to an island of ease and luxury, Al and his dog come to find that the grass can be a little too green on the other side.

A city janitor and his treasured canine companion are transported by a large colorful bird to an island in the sky, where their comfortable paradise existence threatens to turn them into birds as well.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This Caldecott Medal winner tells of a journey to paradise and the discovery that home is best. Ages 3-up. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
K Up The theme here is, ``be happy with who you are,'' or maybe, ``there's no free lunch.'' Al, a janitor, lives a meager existence with his companion (dog) Eddie in New York City. They complain to each other about their lot and are ready to take off to a better place with a huge bird who just pops in and invites them. This ``island in the sky'' is perfect. All its inhabitants are friendly birds, and there's nothing to do but enjoy the tropical paradise. But when they both begin to sprout feathers and beaks, they realize that there is a price to pay, so they take off, Icarus-styleincluding a plunge into New York Harbor. Safely home, they discover that ``Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found.'' Egielski's solid naturalism provides just the visual foil needed to establish the surreal character of this fantasy. The muted earth tones of the one-room flat contrast symbolically with the bright hues of the birds' plumage and the foliage of the floating paradise. The anatomical appropriateness of Al and Eddie plays neatly against the flamboyant depiction of the plants. Text and pictures work together to challenge readers' concept of reality, with touches such as the stacks of delivered newspapers outside Al's door when he returns fromhis ``dream''? Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812454598
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
  • Publication date: 5/28/1989
  • Sales rank: 615,616
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Arthur Yorinks and Richard Egielski have collaborated on several books together. Mr. Yorinks lives in New York City, and Mr. Egielski lives in Milford, New Jersey.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    great bedtime story

    beautifully illustrated story about being happy for who you are and making the best with your life

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2007

    Give thanks

    This book teaches children to be thankful for what they have even if they don't think it is much. Read this book to be introduced to Al who doesn't have much and his dog buddy Eddy. Al wishes for more and one day a bird comes to make that wish coe true, will Al really be happy? Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2007

    Hey, Al!

    This book is a Caldecott Medal Winning Book. This book is a fantasy book and would be appropriate for children ages 5-7. It is a story that let¿s us see the value of being thankful for the things we are blessed to have. A janitor named Al lives in a small cramped apartment with Eddie, his dog. Al loves Eddie they do everything together. Eddie truly is Al¿s best friend even though he is a dog! Eddie really wants a house with a backyard. One morning a bird comes and tells Al to meet him the next morning for a wonderful change. Can the bird be trusted? Arthur Yorinks is the author. He also writes and directs for the opera. He is the founder and director of The Night Kitchen Radio Theater. Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    Hey, Al

    At one point in our life, we have all dreamed about getting away from reality where there are no worries or troubles. Hey, Al is a wonderful book by Arthur Yorinks with beautiful illustrations done by Richard Egielski. It was published in 1986, and it won the Caldecott Medal as the best illustrated children's book of 1987. Yorinks was born in Long Island, New York on August 21, 1953. For thirty-five years, he has written and directed for opera, theater, dance, film, and radio and has been a distinguished children's book author. Hey, Al is about a guy named Al, who is a janitor, and his talking dog Eddie. They are flown by a colorful bird from their cramped apartment to a beautiful island in the sky that is inhabited by crazy birds. Al and Eddies comfortable paradise existence soon threatens to turn them into birds as well. What do you think could have possibly gone wrong? Will Al and Eddie be stuck there forever? Yorinks did an amazing job when he wrote this book, and the illustrations by Egielski are miraculous. The book is filled with beautiful, assorted colors, and the book brings a wonderful moral lesson to children. Yorinks wrote in the book, ¿Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found.¿ I think this is a great quote from the book because it gives a valuable lesson that there is really no place like home and to be thankful for what you have. This book also allows a child to have an imagination. This books reading level is second to third grade. Yorinks, Arthur. Egielski, Richard. Hey, Al. New York: John D. Lucas Printing Company, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2007

    Hey, Al

    ¿Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found.¿ Al and Eddie go from a tiny cramped one room house to an island in the sky. How could paradise be so bad? It¿s a true lesson to be learned from ¿Hey, Al, a marvelous book by Arthur Yorinks. Yorinks has written over two dozen award winning children¿s books. The illustrations in ¿Hey, Al¿ are marvelous. They are brightly colored and follow along with the storyline. Al and Eddie¿s adventure through the book is an excellent way to illustrate a valuable lesson. Yorinks, Arthur. Egielski, Richard. Hey, Al. New York: John D. Lucas Printing Company, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2006

    Wonderful Book!

    This books theme is about a janitor and his dog, Al and Eddie, whom live in a single room on the west side. They two friends do everything together like eating and working. But, there is one problem the place they live is to small and their lives are an endless struggle. Until one day a bird offers to change there lives by transporting the Al and Eddie to an island in the sky where they live very nice and comfortable. But, as much as they enjoy the island they began to miss home. So what do you think Al and Eddie decide to live at the island or home? This books genre is a picture book with wonderful color and detail in every picture. My favorite quote from the book is ¿Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found¿. The author of this book Arthur Yorinks is was born August 21, 1953 in Rosyln, New York. He attended the New School for Social Research and Hofstra University. He performed and wrote for the American Mime Theatre and is best known for writing books about ballet, music, and acting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2006

    Caldecott: Hey, Al

    Have you ever wished your life was a little different? In this book a janitor, Al, and his dog, Eddie, live in a small place. They are best friends and do everything together. A big bird offers them a chance to go to a place where their lives will be better. The next day the bird appearend and ¿Al and Eddie were ferried thousands of fee upward to an island in the sky¿. They arrived at this beautiful island. ¿Unbelievable! Lush trees, rolling hills, gorgeous grass. Birds flitted to and fro. Waterfalls cascaded into shimmering pools.¿ The two enjoyed their life in this beautiful tropical island. However, they started to turn into birds. They flew back home, and realized their life wasn¿t so bad after all. This cute book is written by Arthur Yorinks and illustrated by Richard Egielski. Arthur has written sixteen books for children. The illustrations in this book are beautiful, watercolor illustrations that add much emphasis to the story. Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. New York: Farra, Straus and Giroux, 1986. Reading level: Ages 5-7

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2006

    Hey, AL

    Hey, Al is a Caldecott medal book. Al, is a janitor. He lives in a single room on the west side with his dog, Eddie. The two of them do everything together. They are best friends. What else could they need? Eddie growled, ¿We can¿t have a house? A little back yard to run around in for a change?¿ Then one morning a bird cam and told Al to meet him there the next morning for a wonderful change. Will Al trust the bird? This book would be good for grades 2nd-6th. This is a fantasy book. I really enjoyed this book. Arthur Yorinks wrote the books and Richard Egielski illustrated the book. They have work together on several books. Besides writing books he also writes and directs for the opera. He is also the founder and director of The Night Kitchen Radio Theater. Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Caldecott Winner Hey, Al

    Have you ever gotten bored with life and felt that there was something more? Well, as Al displays in the book, be careful what you wish for. Living in a one-room apartment, one bathroom, with just your dog, Eddie, and yourself a, ¿Paradise lost is sometimes heaven found.¿ I love this book because it teaches appreciation to children to be grateful for what they have and not to dwell on what they don¿t. This book is on a 2nd grade level. This book was written by Arthur Yorinks. Yorinks is the author of two-dozen award winning and acclaimed books. Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. Toronto: Collins publishers, 1986.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2006

    Paradise is just around the corner.

    Sometimes, life throws you a curve a ball, and it seems like no matter how hard you work, you get nothing accomplished. T hat is the case with Al and his companion Eddie. Al is a janitor, while Eddie helps out as much as he can. Eddie isn't satisfied with how they were living, so he tells Al, 'Look at this dump. We can't have a house? A little back yard to run around in for a change.' Al retaliates by saying, ' Today it's a house you want. Tomorrow, who knows? Maybe the Moon!' Eddie gets even madder and tells Al that pigeons live better than them. Then one day someone arrives with an unresistable offer. They take the offer and go with the creature where they find everything that they ever wanted. Soon, Al and Eddie began to transform and their dream became a nightmare. Hey, Al is written by Arthur Yorinks and illustrated by Richard Egielski. Arthur was born August 21, 1953 and lives in New York City. Richard Egielski lives in Milford, New Jersey. Together they won the 1987 Caldecott Medal and have written many other books. Hey, Al is a wonderful story about how sometimes the things we want aren't always what they seem (Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found) The book, although the illustrations do not cover the pages, are very colorful and vibrant. It is a cute story that is worth reading. At first the book may seem a little plan but as you read the picture and story begin to unfold in to beautiful works of art. Grade Level: 2nd Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, Al. New York: Farra, Straus and Giroux, 1986

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2006

    Great story

    Yorinks, Arthur. Hey, AL. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux 1986. Hey, AL. A fun adventure for Al and his best friend, Eddie. Al thinks his life is boring. One morning he hears a bird say, ¿Hey, Al¿ ¿Are you working too hard?¿ Al was confused at first, but he listened to what the bird had to say. The next morning, Al and Eddie follow the bird to a beautiful paradise. Al says, ¿What a life.¿ However, after they are there for a while something strange happens to Al and Eddie. Soon they find that the life they had before wasn¿t so bad after all. Read this enchanting story to see what Al and Eddie are up to in this beautifully illustrated book. Hey, Al is a great story that allows the reader to use his/her imagination. Arthur Yorinks writes very vivid and imaginative stories for young readers. He won a Caldecott award for Hey, Al. Very little is written about the author and illustrator. He has written many wonderful children's books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2001

    Gorgeous Illustrations and a Timeless Story of Values

    This book won the Caldecott Medal as the best illustrated children's book of 1987. The wistful, bright water colors will entrance you and your child as you follow this excursion into fantasy. Al, who is a janitor, lives in a one room, one bathroom apartment on the West Side of New York City. His only companion is his loyal dog, Eddie. Not only is the place small, it is not very neat and tidy. Eddie yearns vocally for a house with a back yard. All this changes one morning when Al is startled by a huge rainbow-beaked toucan-like bird poking his head into the bathroom while Al prepares for work. The bird offers Al and Eddie a change. The next morning, both are ready and waiting in the bathroom. The bird carries them to a misty island high in the sky filled with beautiful pools, waterfalls, vegetation, birds, and butterflies. 'Unbelievable' is their reaction. 'They never had it so good.' They lazed in pools of water, and ate wonderful ripe fruit. What a change from a small apartment! But one morning, Al and Eddie started to turn into birds. Al said, 'I don't want to be a bird. I'd rather mop floors!' They head back, flapping their wings. Eddie tires and falls into the sea. Al barely gets to the apartment, where he is heartbroken over Eddie's loss. But Al has regained his human form in the process. Then, Eddie returns, having swum from where he dropped into the ocean back to the shore. Al realizes that 'Paradise lost is sometimes Heaven found.' The last scene shows Al starting to paint the apartment a bright yellow as Eddie looks on. The story follows the general theme of many children's stories where the reality of experiencing something more that has been yearned for makes the characters realize the greater value of what they already have had. You will find this theme in stories as diverse as Peter Pan, The Wizard of Oz, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew. Naturally, this story is a set-up to help you and your child discuss and count your blessings, including each other. You can also relate the story back to experiences about being glad to return home from a trip or a vacation, even though everyone had a wonderful time. Put what you have in perspective of the lesser alternatives, and strive to make the best of what you do have! Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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