Hey, New Kid! [NOOK Book]

Overview

Cody's father is an F.B.I. agent, he's got a pet emu, and he's an ace on Rollerblades. At least, that's what Cody tells his class on the first day at his new school. Being Super Deluxe Cody is great, until someone throws a skating party. And suddenly, the game may be up!

Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers, including How to Be Cool in the Third Grade, The Math Wiz and Utterly Yours,...
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Hey, New Kid!

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Overview

Cody's father is an F.B.I. agent, he's got a pet emu, and he's an ace on Rollerblades. At least, that's what Cody tells his class on the first day at his new school. Being Super Deluxe Cody is great, until someone throws a skating party. And suddenly, the game may be up!

Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers, including How to Be Cool in the Third Grade, The Math Wiz and Utterly Yours, Booker Jones. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.
Ellen Thompson has illustrated over one hundred children's book jackets, and her work has appeared in numerous magazines. She lives in Franklin Park, New Jersey.


Third-grader Jeremy dreads going to a new school when his family moves, so he decides to reinvent himself, hoping his new classmates will be impressed.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Dr. Judy Rowen
Cody decides to cope with his first day in a new school by being "Super Cody," someone the other kids will admire. He spins so many lies that he just wants to hide rather than being found out. He finally 'fesses up after a hilarious episode unmasks him. Cody's angst is relayed with gentle humor.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-4-Because he's dreading being the new kid in school, Cody, a quirky, wise-cracking third grader, transforms himself into Super Cody. Nothing is ordinary in his life; he tells everyone he's a world-class skater, that he has a pet emu, and that his father is an FBI agent. But rather than making the transition smoother, his new image only causes embarrassment. He is invited to Holly's skating party, and since he's never really skated, he succeeds in rolling into the girl's bathroom and exiting as a toilet-paper mummy. But thanks to a supportive mother, an understanding teacher, a few kids willing to give him a chance, and a science project, he makes friends. Duffey's characters display a wide variety of realistic emotions, and students will readily identify with them.-Christina Dorr, Calcium Primary School, NY
Susan Dove Lempke
When his family moves in the middle of the school year, third-grader Cody decides to start fresh: instead of being ordinary Cody, he's going to be Super Cody. Standing in front of his new class, he announces he's from Alaska instead of Topeka, Kansas, and that he's "smart, supersmart. In fact, a genius." Despite far-fetched claims, he still feels invincible, even though his lie about being a champion skater is about to be tested at a birthday skating party. Duffey brings Cody safely and humorously through his predicament, letting children sympathize with his embarrassment, and as in "How to Be Cool in Third Grade", she has written this chapter book with an obvious understanding of the real concerns of eight-and nine-year-olds.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101142486
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/1/1998
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 712,683
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author


"I used to get in trouble in grade school - for reading. There was something irresistible about books to me, the things that happened in books always seemed more interesting than my real world of freeze tag and jump rope in Morgantown, West Virginia. My favorite books were biographies. Like most writers I know I have always been interested in people. I like to try to figure out how people think and what they are going to do next. I love to hear how people talk and what they care about.



"I was quiet as a child. I have always liked to listen more than I like to talk. I think that's why I am a writer. If I pay enough attention and listen hard enough to a person I begin to see beyond the words to the feelings and the truth.



"When I was young I didn't plan to be a writer. My mother, Betsy Byars, is a writer and I knew first hand what that meant. You sat at a desk for hours and typed and typed and typed. It didn't seem very exciting. I wanted a job that did not take place in a bedroom, a job that required clothes like a business suit or a white lab coat.



"My mother's writing was a part of my childhood. I have early memories of watching my mother at the typewriter, of reading her manuscripts, of sharing the excitement when a book was accepted for publication and of seeing her stories become books. She often asked me to critique a manuscript by placing an arrow in the margin pointing to the spot where I lost interest. I learned to edit at a young age.



"When it was time for me to choose a career I decided on Medical Technology. I loved science and I got to wear that white lab coat. My favorite job title was given to me when my husband, Bill, and I lived in Ankara, Turkey and I worked at a Turkish hospital. Grand Supreme Supervisor and Expert Specialist. It was the pinnacle of my career as a scientist.



"When my children were born I stayed home to raise them and read to them. I began to get ideas for books of my own and when those ideas came, I knew what to do. I sat at a desk for hours and typed and typed and typed and I discovered it was exciting after all.



"Most of my ideas come from my own children and the things that they do. When Charles invented a food fight catapult at Young Inventor's Camp, I wrote The Gadget War. When we were housebreaking our dog, Chester, I wrote A Boy in the Doghouse. When we moved, I wrote Hey, New Kid.

"When I create a character I usually start with their appearance. The physical features come from people I know. All the feelings of the character come from me. All of my characters are a little bit me. I have Cody's imagination, Lucky's optimism, Booker's love of words.



"When I was growing up in West Virginia, my family ate every meal together- breakfast, lunch and dinner. What I remember most about those meals is laughter. There was no problem so big that we couldn't solve it around that table with love and humor. Most of the laughter came from the stories that we told each other. They usually started with phrases like: You won't believe what happened to me. or That's nothing I... Sharing stories helps people feel better about their own problems.



"I write only in the mornings when my kids are in school. In the afternoons I spend time with them car pooling them to sports and church activities. My favorite thing to do in my spare time has not changed since I was a child - reading."



Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers, including Hey, New Kid!; The Gadget War; The Math Wiz; and Utterly Yours, Booker Jones (all Viking and Puffin). She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.


"I used to get in trouble in grade school - for reading. There was something irresistible about books to me, the things that happened in books always seemed more interesting than my real world of freeze tag and jump rope in Morgantown, West Virginia. My favorite books were biographies. Like most writers I know I have always been interested in people. I like to try to figure out how people think and what they are going to do next. I love to hear how people talk and what they care about.



"I was quiet as a child. I have always liked to listen more than I like to talk. I think that's why I am a writer. If I pay enough attention and listen hard enough to a person I begin to see beyond the words to the feelings and the truth.



"When I was young I didn't plan to be a writer. My mother, Betsy Byars, is a writer and I knew first hand what that meant. You sat at a desk for hours and typed and typed and typed. It didn't seem very exciting. I wanted a job that did not take place in a bedroom, a job that required clothes like a business suit or a white lab coat.



"My mother's writing was a part of my childhood. I have early memories of watching my mother at the typewriter, of reading her manuscripts, of sharing the excitement when a book was accepted for publication and of seeing her stories become books. She often asked me to critique a manuscript by placing an arrow in the margin pointing to the spot where I lost interest. I learned to edit at a young age.



"When it was time for me to choose a career I decided on Medical Technology. I loved science and I got to wear that white lab coat. My favorite job title was given to me when my husband, Bill, and I lived in Ankara, Turkey and I worked at a Turkish hospital. Grand Supreme Supervisor and Expert Specialist. It was the pinnacle of my career as a scientist.



"When my children were born I stayed home to raise them and read to them. I began to get ideas for books of my own and when those ideas came, I knew what to do. I sat at a desk for hours and typed and typed and typed and I discovered it was exciting after all.



"Most of my ideas come from my own children and the things that they do. When Charles invented a food fight catapult at Young Inventor's Camp, I wrote The Gadget War. When we were housebreaking our dog, Chester, I wrote A Boy in the Doghouse. When we moved, I wrote Hey, New Kid.

"When I create a character I usually start with their appearance. The physical features come from people I know. All the feelings of the character come from me. All of my characters are a little bit me. I have Cody's imagination, Lucky's optimism, Booker's love of words.



"When I was growing up in West Virginia, my family ate every meal together- breakfast, lunch and dinner. What I remember most about those meals is laughter. There was no problem so big that we couldn't solve it around that table with love and humor. Most of the laughter came from the stories that we told each other. They usually started with phrases like: You won't believe what happened to me. or That's nothing I... Sharing stories helps people feel better about their own problems.



"I write only in the mornings when my kids are in school. In the afternoons I spend time with them car pooling them to sports and church activities. My favorite thing to do in my spare time has not changed since I was a child - reading."



Betsy Duffey is the author of numerous books for young readers, including Hey, New Kid!; The Gadget War; The Math Wiz; and Utterly Yours, Booker Jones (all Viking and Puffin). She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2001

    read and take a lesson

    This book was excellent. A really clever way of showing kids to just be yourself. When you mislead people and they find out who you are you usally just make a fool of yourself. Just be the person that you are and people will like you even if you aren't super at everything.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2013

    Bookreader10

    I personally don't like this book at all. It isn't really that good at all. I feel really bad for the author. Sorry. I give it 1 star. --bookreader10--

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2012

    GREAT BOOK!!!

    I really enjoyed the entire thing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    ¿!

    Hillo there

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2011

    My review

    This is a good book so far

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2011

    The best book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 17, 2011

    adrianna

    i love it is so inchrosting

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2012

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