Hey You

Hey You

5.0 1
by Jack Ingram
     
 

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Somber piano chords open Jack Ingram's impressive second album, HEY YOU. An acoustic guitar enters, and then Ingram, in dry, husky voice reminiscent of early Jackson Browne, declaims, "Where in hell did you go?" Is he asking the unnamed person father figure in the searing "Biloxi" or himself? Upon the release of his 1997 Steve Earle/Ray Kennedy-produced debut,

Overview

Somber piano chords open Jack Ingram's impressive second album, HEY YOU. An acoustic guitar enters, and then Ingram, in dry, husky voice reminiscent of early Jackson Browne, declaims, "Where in hell did you go?" Is he asking the unnamed person father figure in the searing "Biloxi" or himself? Upon the release of his 1997 Steve Earle/Ray Kennedy-produced debut, LIVIN' OR DYIN', Ingram was hailed in many quarters as the next big thing in alt country, and he had the goods. Smart, introspective, plainspoken original songs and fierce commitment to his message matched a commanding voice, a rootsy, honky-tonk sound, and physical presence on stage. What happened was corporate gamesmanship that robbed him of his label and his momentum. HEY YOU finds an artist who's grown a bit cynical about the motives of those in his orbit (especially lovers gone haywire), while remaining hopeful enough to be open to love and commitment. Then there's "Mustang Burn," where he seems to gloat over an unavoidable liaison with his friend's girlfriend. In the end, everything balances out: In a sharp comment on our times, he's got faith in true love awaiting him right around the corner, but he's less sure if he can get that far. Informed by lessons learned the hard way, HEY YOU's cautionary tales ring true. So much so that Jack Ingram strikes sparks here that mark a major voice in development. Take heed.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
Bouncing back from his first, abortive major-label experience with the shuttered Rising Tide imprint, Jack Ingram lands on another custom label, Sony's Lucky Dog, for his fifth album overall, Hey You. And he just keeps doing what he does, which is producing a lightened version of the kind of Texas singer/songwriter honky tonk music typical of Joe Ely and Steve Earle. Ingram's primary subject is the difficulty of communication between lovers, a topic he pursues in songs like "Talk About," "How Many Days," and "Work This Out." But his better songs are more specific, and often seem to derive from their opening lines. "Biloxi," in which a son criticizes his father for abandoning the family, begins, "Where in hell did you go, " while "Mustang Burn," in which the singer addresses a man whose automobile he may or may not have torched, starts with, "I don't give a damn that your car's on fire." They tell stories that grab you right away, and they're good enough that you wish Ingram's songs were all that good and wonder why they're not.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/01/2008
Label:
Sbme Special Mkts.
UPC:
0886972477725
catalogNumber:
724777

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jack Ingram   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Vocals
Todd Snider   Background Vocals,Harmony
Richard Bennett   Guitar
Tommy Hannum   Pedal Steel Guitar
Tony Harrell   Keyboards
Mike McAdam   Electric Guitar
Bruce Robison   Background Vocals,Vocal Harmony
Pete Coatney   Drums
Scott Esbeck   Electric Bass,Bass Guitar,Background Vocals,Vocal Harmony
Jens Pinkernell   Guitar,Electric Guitar
Kenny Holloway   Background Vocals
Mike McAdam   Guitar

Technical Credits

Todd Snider   Composer
Richard Bennett   Producer,Audio Production
Jack Ingram   Composer
Tom Littlefield   Composer
Bill Johnson   Art Direction
Gus Salmon   Composer
Bill Longhorse   Composer

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Hey You 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jack Ingram follows in the footsteps of Robert Earl Keen. His music is uplifting and always true to Texas Country. His smashing hit, ''Barbie Doll'' reminds guys all over the world of a girl they couldn't live without who eventually broke their heart.