Hiawatha and Megissogwon

Hiawatha and Megissogwon

by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Jeffrey Thompson
     
 

Legendary Hiawatha, son of the West Wind, ventures into a desolate land to battle an evil magician in this compelling episode from Longfellow's epic, The Song of Hiawatha. Action-packed drama combines with magic as the brave young hero slays serpents, evades ghosts, and finally confronts the mighty Megissogwon. Jeffrey Thompson's powerful blend of

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Overview

Legendary Hiawatha, son of the West Wind, ventures into a desolate land to battle an evil magician in this compelling episode from Longfellow's epic, The Song of Hiawatha. Action-packed drama combines with magic as the brave young hero slays serpents, evades ghosts, and finally confronts the mighty Megissogwon. Jeffrey Thompson's powerful blend of scratchboard and computer illustration enchances the magic of Longfellow's stirring poetry, drawing a new generation of children into this classic tale. An afterword by prominent Native American author Joseph Bruchac answers the question: Is this an authentic Native American legend?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In Hiawatha and Megissogwon an excerpt from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's The Song of Hiawatha (1853) illustrator Jeffrey Thompson's combination of scratchboard and computer-generated illustrations appeals to a modern sensibility while preserving the historical flavor. Joseph Bruchac puts Longfellow's poem in the context of its time and clarifies some misleading details in the poem. ( Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-How Hiawatha slew serpents and traversed deadly, black-pitch waters to vanquish the evil magician Megissogwon is told in the "Pearl-Feather" section of "The Song of Hiawatha." Longfellow's words provide the text for a powerful and engrossing picture-book version of the story. Readers who persevere through the no-longer-familiar poem will be rewarded for their efforts by Hiawatha's exciting adventures, ferocious battles, and victorious homecoming. The text has been capably illustrated in a complex process utilizing original drawings, black-and-white scratchboard, and a computer program for color. The result is uniquely suggestive at once of traditional woodblock prints and contemporary computer processes. Colors are deep and vivid. A pattern of multiple frames, irregularly split frames, and double-page spreads effectively heightens the drama of the story. In the back matter, an author's comment provides the details of source material for the patterns and images, including original craftwork of the Ojibway/Chippewa peoples and artifacts on display at the Smithsonian Institution. In an afterword, Joseph Bruchac comments on the authenticity of Hiawatha as a Native American story. He also credits Longfellow's respect for his material and provides background on the poet's original sources. While pointing out the mistakes Longfellow made (including confusing the historic figure of Hiawatha with the Anishinabe trickster Manabozho), Bruchac's balanced comments also pay tribute to this classic poem as the first step in bringing Native American cultures into the national consciousness. This book deserves a place in both the literature and history classrooms.-Dorian Chong, School of Library and Information Science, San Jose State University, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792266761
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 10.36(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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