Hidden City of Taurmond

Hidden City of Taurmond

by Wizardzz
     
 
Lightning Bolt continue on happily, but bassist Brian Gibson's side project, Wizardzz, gives him a chance to show a different -- slightly -- take on things, with him switching to drums. Admittedly it would be wondrous to hear a total solo album of him presumably destroying a drum kit with precision, but this is a duo, and Wizardzz's

Overview

Lightning Bolt continue on happily, but bassist Brian Gibson's side project, Wizardzz, gives him a chance to show a different -- slightly -- take on things, with him switching to drums. Admittedly it would be wondrous to hear a total solo album of him presumably destroying a drum kit with precision, but this is a duo, and Wizardzz's combination of Gibson and Rich Porter's keyboards is as strikingly fun and overwhelming at its best as is Gibson's more well-known group. "Sailship" feels like it should be either a video game fanfare or the music over the opening credits to some lost '80s cop drama -- very much compliments either way -- with the fat tone of Porter's work suggesting the bloated bizarreness of the late '70s beaten into sleek shape, with the later "Chasing Our Shadows" being an equally strong complement. Porter elsewhere embraces playing that's simultaneously classic rock and devolved techno -- check out the central riff to "Glimpse of the Hidden City" for a perfect example -- and at other points goes for full-on spaced-out Laserium rock that's downright genius in its over the top but never not enjoyable combinations. "Jelipper-Lilly Field" goes for everything from Giorgio Moroder motorik-disco sparkles to random who-knows-what, while the twinkly "Diamond Mirror" should have soundtracked any random '70s episode of Nova that talked about computers. Meanwhile, Gibson's playing throughout is very much him -- there's a just-on-the-verge maniac edge that surfaces clearly at moments, such as in the conclusion to "Whispers from Wallface" or throughout "Ladydragons." There are examples of perfect restraint throughout Hidden City of Taurmond, thus the organ-box pulse of "'Do Come In!'," though of course that's immediately followed up by the glaze and annihilation of "Sea Battle at Orkusk," which does its best to live up to the title throughout. A live cut, "Mimi Vivian Sunrise," ends the album on a strong note, with echoed keyboard or tape moans and keening calls adding haunting depth to the rampage.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/21/2006
Label:
Load Records
UPC:
0604197108022
catalogNumber:
80

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