Overview

Robert Miller's father, World War II veteran Herbert Henry Miller, died in 1994. A month later, Robert and his mother discovered the Red Cross diary he had kept while a prisoner of war in Nazi Germany. It
became the catalyst for Robert's quest to learn more about his father's war. The result of that quest is this remarkable book, a story of terror, horrific despair, and Nazi depravity. But it is also a tale of survival against astonishing
odds,...
See more details below
Hidden Hell

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$11.99 List Price

Overview

Robert Miller's father, World War II veteran Herbert Henry Miller, died in 1994. A month later, Robert and his mother discovered the Red Cross diary he had kept while a prisoner of war in Nazi Germany. It
became the catalyst for Robert's quest to learn more about his father's war. The result of that quest is this remarkable book, a story of terror, horrific despair, and Nazi depravity. But it is also a tale of survival against astonishing
odds, of the deep bonds that develop between men at a time of war, and of choosing to leave hate behind. Herb Miller was twenty-one in February 1944 when he boarded the SS Argentina in Boston Harbor with the U.S.
Army's 30th Infantry Division bound for the European war. Miller landed on Omaha Beach on June 11, five days after the mass assault of D-Day. The 30th moved inland, suffering enormous casualties in three major operations.
Captured by the Germans at Mortain, France, in August 6, Miller endured a punishing fifty-four-day march to Moosburg, Germany, where he survived for seven months in Stalag VIIA, the largest POV camp in Nazi Germany.
During his stay at Stalag VIIA, Miller became good friends with a Nazi guard named Heinz. Heinz disappeared from the camp and Miller always believed he was murdered by his fellow Nazis. His friendship with this kind and
decent German man haunted Miller for the rest of his life.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780984637430
  • Publisher: Patton Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/2/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 281
  • Sales rank: 1,365,324
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Robert H. Miller spent three years researching and writing the story of his father's experiences as a POW in World War II. Soon to be published in his second edition, the well-received book My Father's Hidden Hell is the
story of an American soldier who greatly suffered as a POW in Nazi Germany. For the last sixteen years Miller has worked in advanced LED lighting and technology design centered on the global market. Miller travels
extensively in Europe for his work and in the emerging auto markets of China, India, and Brazil. He took advantage of his time in Europe to research and write his book. In August 2010, Miller accepted the newly created
position of Executive Director of the Patton Foundation. In this role Miller will oversee the foundation's efforts in America to put into practice General George Patton's concerns for the welfare of American soldiers and their
families. Miller will also be working to ensure the continued preservation of the World War II Patton archives, which are located in historic areas of France. Miller has been a professional photographer for thirty-six years and has
won several international awards. His lives in Canton, Michigan, with his wife, Colleen. They have five children.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    As an educator, I have devoted much of my life to studying the e

    As an educator, I have devoted much of my life to studying the effects of World War II upon the world. With my students, I have spent many years interviewing veterans and Holocaust survivors. This book hit home for many reasons.

    Robert Miller's story about his father really stopped me in my tracks. Here is man who, like many of us grew up in a "quote-un-quote" normal, post World War II childhood, with a mom and dad and a picket fence, but who also understood that somehow Dad was different. Why won't Dad ring the back yard with the standard fence that all the neighbors have? Why doesn't he like fireworks, and why must he drive us around the tall hedgerow lined field to go to a fishing spot? Dad's idiosyncrasies were not necessarily a cause for alarm; in fact, it was a point of honor when together with young school mates. "My dad was in the war"...

    After his dad passed on, Robert found his Dad's POW diary. He began to sit with his mother, as she unleashed her own catharsis of what his father has gone through as a soldier and a prisoner of war. Robert's narrative moves quickly, and absorbs you as you go with his dad through the landings at Omaha, the Norman hedgerows, the push at St. Lo, the cluster SNAFU of Operation Cobra, and his capture at Mortain. Then, you really enter the world of Herbert Miller as he struggles to survive.

    Robert has written a moving narrative of his quest to truly discover his father's war, which is really every American's war. We can't afford to forget what our soldiers went through, and what our military families and their offspring go through. Thanks, Robert, for reminding us of that, and for this moving tribute to your parents of the World War II generation. So many lessons can be learned from this book. Pick it up and read it. Especially the chapter entitled "The Wooden Shoes". His dad brought home a pair, marked by him "June 21, 1944". When young Robert would put them on to clank around the house and play, he learned that he could not play with them. A young man's life was changed forever on that day. You need to read this book, and find out why.

    Matthew Rozell
    Award winning History Teacher.
    USA

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 29, 2012

    Incredibly Important Historical Story

    Hidden Hell tells the story of a man who, in his lifetime, could never express what he endured to anyone. It’s also a story about his son, who in many ways became closer to his father after his death. The story begins with Robert Miller’s discovery of his father’s World War II POW diary and goes on to chronicle its harrowing contents. Rich with historical insight and integral research, this book offers a unique view of survival during World War II, delivered with poignant narratives and unforgivingly brutal detail. The writing style allows you to feel as though you personally know Herbert Miller, both as a middle-aged man so haunted by his past that baseball games and fireworks triggered PTSD, and the young man fighting to stay alive in a Nazi prison camp. There have been many World War II stories as well as Holocaust stories, but few that I know of that go into such depth about what it is like to be a prisoner of war, and the toll it takes long after a person comes home, gets married and raises a family. As a journalist who has had the opportunity to work with World War II veterans, I have never come across a story as compelling, devastating and inspiring story as Mr. Herbert Miller’s.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 27, 2012

    Great story about the war from a POW perspective

    I love to have a book in my hands that I cannot put down. This is one of those good reads that you think about long after the final chapter. Beautifully written, the author invites you to see the goodness of a man who lived the hell of WWII. So much of the soldier's experience is too dreadful to remember. To find this man's experience as he had recorded it gives a window into his life during the war and for years after. Thank you for this great book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    Everyone must read!

    I am an avid book reader (I read about 30 books a week approximately), and have read and re-read this book many times. It is an extremely well-written book that was a true joy to read despite my lack of interest of reading books of this time period. It is obvious that the author did extensive research to ensure accuracy and the ability to paint details to further enhance the book, which is why this book makes my top 3 books to read ever. This is the first book with the subject matter about World War II that I have ever enjoyed reading and wanted to re-read over and over again. Robert H. Miller's style of writing is insightful, eloquent and spell-binding.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)