Overview

For readers of The Boy Who Dared and Prisoner B-3087, a collection of unforgettable true stories of children hidden away during World War II. Jaap Sitters was only eight years old when his mother cut the yellow stars off his clothes and sent him, alone, on a fifteen-mile walk to hide with relatives. It was a terrifying night, one he would never forget. Before the end of the war, he would hide in secret rooms and behind walls. He would suffer from hunger, sickness, and the looming threat of Nazi raids. But he ...
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Hidden Like Anne Frank

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Overview

For readers of The Boy Who Dared and Prisoner B-3087, a collection of unforgettable true stories of children hidden away during World War II. Jaap Sitters was only eight years old when his mother cut the yellow stars off his clothes and sent him, alone, on a fifteen-mile walk to hide with relatives. It was a terrifying night, one he would never forget. Before the end of the war, he would hide in secret rooms and behind walls. He would suffer from hunger, sickness, and the looming threat of Nazi raids. But he would live. This is just one of the true stories told in Hidden Like Anne Frank, a collection of eye-opening first-person accounts that share the experience of going into hiding to escape the Holocaust. Some were just toddlers when they were hidden; some were teenagers. Some hid with neighbors or family, while many were with complete strangers. But all know the pain of losing their homes, their families, even their own names. They describe the secret network that kept them safe. And they share the coincidences and close calls that made all the difference.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
★ 05/01/2014
Gr 7 Up—While Anne Frank may have been the most famous of those who went into hiding during World War II, there were hundreds of others who did just about anything they could to escape the Nazis. Though most did not survive, this compilation of 14 stories describes those who did live to tell their tale. Inspired by his mother's account of hiding when she was just six years old, Prins interviewed other survivors. The tales are all horrifying and harrowing in their own ways yet are marked by an unvarnished tone that conveys an immediacy that sweeps readers into the narrative, making this tragic episode of history real and dramatic. One survivor had as many as 42 different addresses, while another describes hiding under floorboards for hours while German officers walked overhead. The threat of exposure by collaborators was ever present, and the trauma didn't end after the war, as most lost many family members or had their homes given away and all traces of their former lives were gone. Photographs of the contributors, both now and then, as well as a glossary are included. An accompanying website with excerpts, maps, animations, and other material is quite engaging and worth perusing. This moving and powerful title is an important addition to any history collection.—Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA
Publishers Weekly
★ 02/17/2014
Kindled by his mother’s own story and drawing from original interviews, Prins and co-author Steenhuis compile 14 accounts from Dutch-born individuals who lived in hiding as children during WWII. Rita Degen (Prins’s mother) was yanked from school and sent to a foster family where she was forced to change her name and pretend to be age five to avoid having to wear a yellow star. Jaap Sitters was harassed at school after friends’ parents became members of the National Socialist Movement; he chillingly recalls the claustrophobic crawlspace where he lay hidden in silent darkness. Auschwitz prisoner Bloeme Emden describes surviving deplorable conditions and the aftershocks of trauma after returning home: “I was bald and emaciated. He didn’t recognize me until I spoke. Everything about you can change, but voices stay the same.” These first-person stories of heroism and inhumanity explore the true scope of Holocaust atrocities, while also serving as a testament to resilience. Maps, footnotes, past and current photographs of the interviewees, and a glossary are included; additional resources are available on a companion Web site. Ages 12–up. (Apr.)
From the Publisher
Kirkus Starred Review
Dutch survivors of the Holocaust remember their years as hidden children.

During Hitler’s reign of terror, paths to survival for Jews were few and involved secrecy, danger, vigilance, and the kindness and bravery of strangers. Fourteen men and women recall their experiences with amazing clarity, detail and honesty. There are several commonalities in the accounts. Most began their ordeal at very young ages and had to take on heavy responsibilities and new identities, enduring frequent moves, incidents of near discovery, and unending fear and uncertainty. Some found compassion and love among their rescuers, and others were treated callously by sponsors who accepted them only for the stipend that the resistance organizations paid. After the war, most of them found that nearly all their family members had been killed, relationships with surviving parents were awkward, their homes had been given to other people, and postwar authorities were slow to help them resettle. The accounts are told in a matter-of-fact tone, with no attempt at sentimentality or self-pity. Photos of the survivors before the war and of some of their temporary homes and families accompany the text, and photos as they are now are shown at the end. Each memoir is poignant and heartrending on its own, and the compilation gives the reader a stunning sense of the horror of the Holocaust.

  

Terrifying, haunting and powerful.

Publishers Weekly Starred Review
Kindled by his mother’s own story and drawing from original interviews, Prins and co-author Steenhuis compile 14 accounts from Dutch-born individuals who lived in hiding as children during WWII. Rita Degen (Prins’s mother) was yanked from school and sent to a foster family where she was forced to change her name and pretend to be age five to avoid having to wear a yellow star. Jaap Sitters was harassed at school after friends’ parents became members of the National Socialist Movement; he chillingly recalls the claustrophobic crawlspace where he lay hidden in silent darkness. Auschwitz prisoner Bloeme Emden describes surviving deplorable conditions and the aftershocks of trauma after returning home: “I was bald and emaciated. He [my boyfriend] didn’t recognize me until I spoke. Everything about you can change, but voices stay the same.” These first-person stories of heroism and inhumanity explore the true scope of Holocaust atrocities, while also serving as a testament to resilience. Maps, footnotes, past and current photographs of the interviewees, and a glossary are included; additional resources are available on a companion Web site.

Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-01-04
Dutch survivors of the Holocaust remember their years as hidden children. During Hitler's reign of terror, paths to survival for Jews were few and involved secrecy, danger, vigilance, and the kindness and bravery of strangers. Fourteen men and women recall their experiences with amazing clarity, detail and honesty. There are several commonalities in the accounts. Most began their ordeal at very young ages and had to take on heavy responsibilities and new identities, enduring frequent moves, incidents of near discovery, and unending fear and uncertainty. Some found compassion and love among their rescuers, and others were treated callously by sponsors who accepted them only for the stipend that the resistance organizations paid. After the war, most of them found that nearly all their family members had been killed, relationships with surviving parents were awkward, their homes had been given to other people, and postwar authorities were slow to help them resettle. The accounts are told in a matter-of-fact tone, with no attempt at sentimentality or self-pity. Photos of the survivors before the war and of some of their temporary homes and families accompany the text, and photos as they are now are shown at the end. Each memoir is poignant and heartrending on its own, and the compilation gives the reader a stunning sense of the horror of the Holocaust. Terrifying, haunting and powerful. (foreword, glossary) (Collective memoir. 12 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545543637
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/25/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 180,198
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 66 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Marcel Prins was inspired to create this project by his own mother, who went into hiding in 1942 to escape Nazi persecution. She was just six years old. Marcel Prins is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and cameraman. He lives in Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Peter Henk Steenhuis is a journalist and the philosophy editor for the TROUW daily newspaper in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 2 of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2014

    My name is boby

    ALL I CAN SAY IS THAT IT IS AN AMAZING BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 6, 2015

    more from this reviewer

    There are fourteen true stories of survival from WWII in this no

    There are fourteen true stories of survival from WWII in this novel, some of the stories are from individuals who were only three-years old at the time of this horrific event and others were teenagers, nevertheless they are all true accounts of survivors. I was amazed at the similarities of the stories; it seemed that most of the survivors were passed along to their relatives multiple times and that their names were changed often. Some individuals were shuffled around so frequently I almost forgot what their birth names were and they themselves were reluctant to say it even when liberation was at their front door. I was surprised at the tone of this book as there wasn’t much emotion, scary or traumatizing details in the stories. The narratives gave the facts, remarkable portrayal of facts of what occurred in their lives as the Nazi’s invaded their lives. Some of the stories that I especially enjoyed was reading about a gentlemen who was bitter towards his parents for abandoning him when he was a child. His parents sent him off into hiding at a young age to save him and after reuniting with him after the liberation, he just couldn’t see past this resentment. I found this amazing. Even after all the stories that he has heard about the war, he still harbors these feelings towards his parents when all his parents were trying to do was to provide him a future. Then there was the story of Sieny who worked in the kindergarten which cared for newborns through older children. This was the holding area for the children who were on the way to the concentration camps while their parents were in a different area, as the children made too much noise for the soldiers. Sieny worked to move the children out secretly with the parents as the parents would not register all their children in the kindergarten. Sieny secretly talked to the parents about when they would be leaving the holding area and whether they would like to take their children with them. Sieny knew ahead of time when this time would come. Using baby dolls they could also fool the soldiers. Sieny and other individuals working alongside her saved many children. The means these individuals used to save these children while putting their own lives on the line was truly spectacular.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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