Hiding Edith: A True Story

Hiding Edith: A True Story

4.5 2
by Kathy Kacer
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The remarkable true story of a young girl named Edith and the French village of Moissac that helped her and many other children during the Holocaust. The town's mayor and citizens concealed the presence of hundreds of Jewish children who lived in a safe house, risking their own safety by hiding the children from the Nazis in plain site, saving them from being captured… See more details below

Overview

The remarkable true story of a young girl named Edith and the French village of Moissac that helped her and many other children during the Holocaust. The town's mayor and citizens concealed the presence of hundreds of Jewish children who lived in a safe house, risking their own safety by hiding the children from the Nazis in plain site, saving them from being captured and detained and most certainly saving their lives.

Editorial Reviews

KLIATT - Maureen Griffin
This nicely printed "Holocaust Remembrance Book for Young Readers" is a must purchase for middle-school libraries. Edith Schwalb was a young child when her father was taken by the Nazis because the family was Jewish. She and her mother and siblings had to flee her native Austria and then Belgium. They survived in southern France during the period when six million Jews were killed. Most of Edith's story covers her preteen years when courageous citizens in France defied the Nazis and hid Jews. The Jewish Scouts of France financed the large house at Moissac where Shatta and Bouli Simon protected young Jewish children. The whole town cooperated in this life-saving venture, and hundreds of children were saved. Each time they were warned the Nazis were approaching, the children used their camping skills to hide in the forests. The author crafts conversations based on accounts from other inhabitants of the house, particularly Eric Goldfarb, to supplement Edith's own memory of events. As Edith relates her life at Moissac and a boarding school and then with a farm family, the reader learns of her fear, loneliness, courage, resourcefulness and growing maturity. Facts about the Holocaust are presented deftly for young readers and are supplemented with b/w photos. They can learn much and be strengthened in their own resolve to "remember who they are."
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Edith Schwalb was one of many Jewish children who were hidden by the Jewish Scouts of France in a large house in the village of Moissac. The townspeople helped to protect the children, warning the house mother of Nazi raids, during which time the young scouts disappeared into the hills on camping trips. Schwalb's story is told from the beginning of her family's hardships through the end of the war, and includes the typical privations and separations of Holocaust memoirs. What makes this book unique is the depiction of a special refuge that managed to save every resident child, except one who was removed by her parents. An introduction provides basic World War II history. Black-and-white photographs personalize the story. While the dialogue and emotions are somewhat fictionalized and certain facts have been compressed (as explained in the epilogue), the book seems to be a good reflection of the subject's experiences.-Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The recent inundation of Holocaust literature draws much on personal history; Edith's story stands out for its child-eyed perspective recounted in an easily readable and intriguing narrative. In 1938, Edith and her family wisely leave their home in Vienna, escaping the pending Nazi occupation, keeping a step ahead of the persecution as they next move to Belgium and then France. When her father is finally arrested in Paris, her mother makes the difficult decision to send Edith and her younger brother away to a safety home for Jewish children in the southern countryside. Kacer's clear-cut, poised description magnifies a child's emotional turmoil as she copes with fear, separation from parents, loneliness, her hidden identity and her mistrust of strangers. Edith's survival story also illustrates the benevolent attitude of the village's non-Jewish French citizens, who willingly took part in a conspiracy to protect the children's secret background. As unimaginable as it may seem for today's youngsters to comprehend the experience Edith endured, Kacer has succeeded in allowing the young reader into the apprehensive and troubled mind of this child survivor. Another sensitive addition to the Holocaust Remembrance Series. (Biography. 8-11)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781926739311
Publisher:
Second Story Press
Publication date:
01/01/2006
Series:
Holocaust Remembrance Series for Young Readers
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
152
Sales rank:
599,366
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
9 - 13 Years

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >