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High On The Hog
     

High On The Hog

by Kimberly Olson Fahik, Kimberly O. Fakih
 
Her parents don't know it, but 12-year-old Trapp plans to stay on her great-grandparents' farm forever. She can't bear the thought of leaving Iowa—the only home she's ever known—for New York City. The city is a place for tourists, not a place to live. The Hatfield Farm is home. For now, she has the whole summer to help with the harvesting and

Overview

Her parents don't know it, but 12-year-old Trapp plans to stay on her great-grandparents' farm forever. She can't bear the thought of leaving Iowa—the only home she's ever known—for New York City. The city is a place for tourists, not a place to live. The Hatfield Farm is home. For now, she has the whole summer to help with the harvesting and canning, to work on her fastball...and to figure out how to break the news to her folks.

But the day Trapp's pitch puts a hole in a barn wall is the day she discovers a long-kept secret in her family's past, and afterward she just can't look at home in the same way. Maybe moving on doesn't always mean leaving behind what you love.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Twelve-year-old Trapp dreads her family's upcoming move from a small town in Iowa to New York City. While her parents are house-hunting in Manhattan, Trapp spends the summer on her great-grandparents' farm. Trapp, however, must revise her uncomplicated understanding of her great-grandparents--and her fear of change--when she happens upon a family secret. The melodramatic quality of the secret is exacerbated by a contrived and somewhat obvious story line (involving the purchase of a roomy Park Avenue townhouse ``for a song''), and is further problematized by self-conscious, Fielding-esque chapter titles (``On bonding, or why corn-fed folk of the Midwest are so likely to get together,'' reads one). These devices are at odds with the fresh, realistic style of Fakih's ( Grandpa Putter and Granny Hoe ) prose, who fashions Trapp fluidly. Her heroine is fallible, likable and easily recognizable in her uneven approach toward maturity. Ages 10-12. (May)
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Although Trapp has enjoyed living in Mason City, Iowa, she really glories in spending the summer with her great-grandparents on their farm. Dreading her family's upcoming move to New York City, she confides to her great grandfather Hatfield that she plans to stay. When he lovingly tells her that it's probably not meant to be, she naturally is puzzled. After all, the Hatfields deeply love her, and she has real feeling for the farm. As the summer ends, she worries about the increasing frailty of the Hatfields and how they will manage the harvest once more. Little does she realize that the discovery of initials carved long ago have already set her unwittingly on a search for her true identity. As in Grandpa Putter and Granny Hoe (Farrar, 1992), Fakih demonstrates, this time for an older audience, that an elder generation can offer youngsters tremendous potential for emotional and philosophical growth. From lyrical descriptions of the farm spring natural discussions of the seasons of man. The value of shared time and memory in the passing on of a family's emotional legacy is beautifully delineated. Fakih's latest book is for mature readers as both structure and theme are serious and complex.-Cindy Darling Codell, Clark Middle School, Winchester, KY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440410812
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
06/01/1996
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.22(w) x 7.65(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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