High-Yield Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Brief Sessions: An Illustrated Guide

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Overview

High-Yield Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Brief Sessions: An Illustrated Guide breaks entirely new ground in explaining how to weave together the powerful tools of CBT with pharmacotherapy in sessions shorter than the traditional "50-minute hour." Written for psychiatrists, therapists, and other clinicians, the book details ways to enrich brief sessions with practical CBT interventions that work to relieve symptoms and promote wellness.

An engaging and instructive resource of video illustrations included with the book demonstrates how to successfully implement brief CBT sessions for some of the most common and important problems seen in clinical practice-depression, anxiety, psychotic symptoms, suicidality, sleep disturbances, substance abuse, and coping with physical health issues. Written by practicing clinicians with extensive experience in combining CBT and pharmacotherapy, this volume builds on the constructs and techniques described in the authors' earlier best-selling illustrated guides, Learning Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Severe Mental Illness.

A must-read for working clinicians as well as trainees, this book offers pragmatic solutions for the challenge of providing effective psychotherapy in brief treatment sessions.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody Reviews
Reviewer: Sheila M. Dowd, PhD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is a guide to combining cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy in brief treatment sessions.
Purpose: The purpose is to illustrate the use of what the authors' identify as high-yield cognitive behavior therapy techniques in combination with pharmacotherapy. Their objectives dovetail with those in the field who continue to try to provide the most therapeutic benefit with the most efficient use of time. The authors make a reasoned and thoughtful argument based on their clinical experience, providing data from their practice. I look forward to research supporting this model. I hope that these brief treatments can be as effective as the traditional 50-minute therapy session. I still need convincing, but perhaps that is because I am a psychologist.
Audience: The book is intended for clinicians who prescribe and want to use cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, advanced practice nurses). As the authors point out, some of the techniques require a good understanding of cognitive behavior therapy in order to use them in brief sessions. So, readers will need that foundation to get the most from this book. The authors are leading clinicians and researchers in the field.
Features: The authors first present their model of combined brief treatment. They identify how this model works in a clinic by outlining the time structure, which is helpful. The remaining chapters focus on the high-yield techniques, provide interesting case examples, and suggest that readers watch the DVD sessions associated with the chapter.
Assessment: The authors present a very interesting treatment model that they argue has a lot of clinical value and is very effective in their practice. The techniques they chose are very useful, but the decision to either treat a patient in a brief format or refer to full treatment with cognitive behavior therapy is a complex decision that requires clinical experience. The field would benefit from determining the effective components of our interventions, but that can be difficult. That is why I suggest this book is most appropriate for experienced CBT clinicians who know all the uses of these techniques.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Sheila M. Dowd, PhD (Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is a guide to combining cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy in brief treatment sessions.
Purpose: The purpose is to illustrate the use of what the authors' identify as high-yield cognitive behavior therapy techniques in combination with pharmacotherapy. Their objectives dovetail with those in the field who continue to try to provide the most therapeutic benefit with the most efficient use of time. The authors make a reasoned and thoughtful argument based on their clinical experience, providing data from their practice. I look forward to research supporting this model. I hope that these brief treatments can be as effective as the traditional 50-minute therapy session. I still need convincing, but perhaps that is because I am a psychologist.
Audience: The book is intended for clinicians who prescribe and want to use cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, advanced practice nurses). As the authors point out, some of the techniques require a good understanding of cognitive behavior therapy in order to use them in brief sessions. So, readers will need that foundation to get the most from this book. The authors are leading clinicians and researchers in the field.
Features: The authors first present their model of combined brief treatment. They identify how this model works in a clinic by outlining the time structure, which is helpful. The remaining chapters focus on the high-yield techniques, provide interesting case examples, and suggest that readers watch the DVD sessions associated with the chapter.
Assessment: The authors present a very interesting treatment model that they argue has a lot of clinical value and is very effective in their practice. The techniques they chose are very useful, but the decision to either treat a patient in a brief format or refer to full treatment with cognitive behavior therapy is a complex decision that requires clinical experience. The field would benefit from determining the effective components of our interventions, but that can be difficult. That is why I suggest this book is most appropriate for experienced CBT clinicians who know all the uses of these techniques.
The American Journal of Psychiatry
This is an excellent reference guide for any provider wanting to learn how to use CBT strategies in brief sessions. It is readable and well supported with resources and references and an excellent demonstration DVD. I highly recommend this book to providers who work in brief sessions, primary care and psychiatry residents, and psychologists and social workers who provide services in unconventional settings.

(Patricia A. Arean, Ph.D. )

From The Critics
Reviewer: Sheila M. Dowd, PhD(Rush University Medical Center)
Description: This is a guide to combining cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy in brief treatment sessions.
Purpose: The purpose is to illustrate the use of what the authors' identify as high-yield cognitive behavior therapy techniques in combination with pharmacotherapy. Their objectives dovetail with those in the field who continue to try to provide the most therapeutic benefit with the most efficient use of time. The authors make a reasoned and thoughtful argument based on their clinical experience, providing data from their practice. I look forward to research supporting this model. I hope that these brief treatments can be as effective as the traditional 50-minute therapy session. I still need convincing, but perhaps that is because I am a psychologist.
Audience: The book is intended for clinicians who prescribe and want to use cognitive behavioral therapy (i.e., psychiatrists, psychiatry residents, advanced practice nurses). As the authors point out, some of the techniques require a good understanding of cognitive behavior therapy in order to use them in brief sessions. So, readers will need that foundation to get the most from this book. The authors are leading clinicians and researchers in the field.
Features: The authors first present their model of combined brief treatment. They identify how this model works in a clinic by outlining the time structure, which is helpful. The remaining chapters focus on the high-yield techniques, provide interesting case examples, and suggest that readers watch the DVD sessions associated with the chapter.
Assessment: The authors present a very interesting treatment model that they argue has a lot of clinical value and is very effective in their practice. The techniques they chose are very useful, but the decision to either treat a patient in a brief format or refer to full treatment with cognitive behavior therapy is a complex decision that requires clinical experience. The field would benefit from determining the effective components of our interventions, but that can be difficult. That is why I suggest this book is most appropriate for experienced CBT clinicians who know all the uses of these techniques.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585623624
  • Publisher: American Psychiatric Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/30/2010
  • Pages: 383
  • Sales rank: 1,312,107
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Jesse H. Wright, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor and Vice Chair for Academic Affairs in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Director of the Depression Center at the University of Louisville in Kentucky.

Donna M. Sudak, M.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Psychotherapy Training at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Douglas Turkington, M.D., is Professor of Psychosocial Psychiatry at the Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Royal Victoria Infirmary; and Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist with Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Trust, St. Nicholas Hospital, Gosforth, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, United Kingdom

Michael E. Thase, M.D., is Professor of Psychiatry and Director of the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Section at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

American Psychiatric Publishing

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Table of Contents

Foreword xi

Preface xv

Acknowledgments xix

1 Introduction 1

2 Indications and Formats for Brief CBT Sessions 17

3 Enhancing the Impact of Brief Sessions 35

4 Case Formulation and Treatment Planning 63

5 Promoting Adherence 81

6 Behavioral Methods for Depression 99

7 Targeting Maladaptive Thinking 113

8 Treating Hopelessness and Suicidality 145

9 Behavioral Methods for Anxiety 167

10 CBT Methods for Insomnia 195

11 Modifying Delusions 211

12 Coping With Hallucinations 229

13 CBT for Substance Misuse and Abuse 243

14 Lifestyle Change: Building Healthy Habits 259

15 CBT in Medical Patients 279

16 Relapse Prevention 297

Appendix 1 Worksheets and Checklists 315

Appendix 2 CBT Resources for Patients and Families 327

Appendix 3 CBT Educational Resources for Clinicians 331

Appendix 4 DVD Guide 333

Index 335

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