Higher Education in the Digital Age

Higher Education in the Digital Age

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by William G. Bowen
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0691159300

ISBN-13: 9780691159300

Pub. Date: 04/07/2013

Publisher: Princeton University Press

Two of the most visible and important trends in higher education today are its exploding costs and the rapid expansion of online learning. Could the growth in online courses slow the rising cost of college and help solve the crisis of affordability? In this short and incisive book, William G. Bowen, one of the foremost experts on the intersection of education and

Overview

Two of the most visible and important trends in higher education today are its exploding costs and the rapid expansion of online learning. Could the growth in online courses slow the rising cost of college and help solve the crisis of affordability? In this short and incisive book, William G. Bowen, one of the foremost experts on the intersection of education and economics, explains why, despite his earlier skepticism, he now believes technology has the potential to help rein in costs without negatively affecting student learning. As a former president of Princeton University, an economist, and author of many books on education, including the acclaimed bestseller The Shape of the River, Bowen speaks with unique expertise on the subject.

Surveying the dizzying array of new technology-based teaching and learning initiatives, including the highly publicized emergence of "massive open online courses" (MOOCs), Bowen argues that such technologies could transform traditional higher education —allowing it at last to curb rising costs by increasing productivity, while preserving quality and protecting core values. But the challenges, which are organizational and philosophical as much as technological, are daunting. They include providing hard evidence of whether online education is cost-effective in various settings, rethinking the governance and decision-making structures of higher education, and developing customizable technological platforms. Yet, Bowen remains optimistic that the potential payoff is great.

Based on the 2012 Tanner Lectures on Human Values, delivered at Stanford University, the book includes responses from Stanford president John Hennessy, Harvard University psychologist Howard Gardner, Columbia University literature professor Andrew Delbanco, and Coursera cofounder Daphne Koller.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691159300
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
04/07/2013
Pages:
200
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ix
FOREWORD TO THE PAPERBACK EDITION xvii
CONTRIBUTORS xxv
Part 1. Costs and Productivity in Higher Education 1
Cost Trends, the "Cost Disease," and Productivity in Higher Education 2
Factors Other Than the Cost Disease Pushing Up Educational Costs 9
Affordability 18
Is There a Serious Problem—Even a Crisis? 24
Notes 27
Part 2. Prospects for an Online Fix 43
Background 44
The Lack of Hard Evidence 46
The Need for Customizable, Sustainable Platforms (or Tool Kits) 55
The Need for New Mindsets—and Fresh Thinking about Decision-Making 62
What Must We Retain? 67
Appendix: The Online Learning Landscape 72
Notes 77
Discussion by Howard Gardner 97
Discussion by John Hennessy 109
William G. Bowen's Responses to Discussion Session Comments by Howard Gardner and John Hennessy 123
Discussion by Andrew Delbanco 129
Discussion by Daphne Koller 145
William G. Bowen's Responses to Discussion Session Comments by Andrew Delbanco and Daphne Koller 157
APPENDIX TO THE PAPERBACK EDITION 163
INDEX 191

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Higher Education in the Digital Age 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Tunguz More than 1 year ago
Higher education, particularly in the US, is on the verge of a major structural change. There has been a lot of speculation in recent years about the ever-increasing cost of higher education, the mounting student college debt (which has surpassed one trillion dollars this year), and the growing uncertainty of the job prospects even for college graduates. Hardly a week goes by without another major story in the media about some disconcerting aspects of the higher educational ecosystem. Books and articles (such as this one) proclaiming the existence of the higher-educational bubble pop out on a very regular basis. Rarely, however, have I had the opportunity to read an account of the current state of higher education from one of its more distinguished leaders. “Higher Education in the Digital Age” promises to be just such book. The book is based on the Tanner Lectures on Human Values delivered at Stanford University in the fall of 2012. The main lectures – and the bulk of this book – are written by William Bowen, former president of Princeton University. The rest of the book is comprised of the responses by some equally distinguished higher educational luminaries, including the current president of Stanford University. All of the contributors to this book are clearly very familiar with the virtues and the problems of the higher education. Stanford in particular has in recent years been investing a lot of time and resources on trying to make education more affordable and accessible – from increasingly more generous student financial aid packages, to the launching of its own online educational initiative. The online education seems to be one of the main directions in which the future of education is headed, and this book makes an assessment of its potential and pitfalls. It gives many interesting insights and “rebuttals” of the criticism of higher education. Its definitely worth reading in order to get the sense of what academic leaders are thinking right now as far as their own profession is concerned.  So what is the conclusion of this book? I don’t have the nitty-gritty economics expertise to do the full justice to the arguments presented in it. However, I have spent most of my professional life in the academia, and together with many years of undergraduate and graduate training I have a fairly good idea of the ills and the shortcomings of this system. My sense is that the “correction” to the higher-educational bubble is inevitable, and it’s more likely to happen sooner rather than later. Its effects, in turn, will probably be much more dramatic, in ways that we can’t fully appreciate right now, than what most people expect. With that in mind I think that this book is grossly underestimating the extent of the upcoming crisis. It proposes palliative measures where much more structurally radical changes are in order. After reading this book I was left with a renewed sense that the leaders in the Ivory Tower have managed to thoroughly immure themselves in their world and are largely impervious to the economic forces that affect all the other aspects of the modern world. They might present this as a virtue, but more and more people are increasingly viewing it as a potentially devastating defect. Their analysis of the current system may be correct as far as it goes, but I am afraid that we are on a verge of a truly radical educational revolution. I was reminded of what Henry Ford’s quipping that if he had listened to his customers he would have built a faster horse. Alas, after reading this book I got a sense that it was a valiant attempt to make a case for a faster higher educational horse.