Hikers & Backpackers Guide for Treating Medical Emergencies by Patrick Brighton, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Hikers & Backpackers Guide for Treating Medical Emergencies

Hikers & Backpackers Guide for Treating Medical Emergencies

by Patrick Brighton
     
 

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From treatment for a sprained ankle to CPR, Hikers' and Backpackers' Guide to Treating Medical Emergencies is a manual that is easy to use when faced with a medical emergency. The book prepares hikers to prevent illness and injury; recognize illness and injury when it occurs; and remain calm and implement appropriate treatment when needed. With a refreshing splash

Overview

From treatment for a sprained ankle to CPR, Hikers' and Backpackers' Guide to Treating Medical Emergencies is a manual that is easy to use when faced with a medical emergency. The book prepares hikers to prevent illness and injury; recognize illness and injury when it occurs; and remain calm and implement appropriate treatment when needed. With a refreshing splash of humor, this series is as informative as it is entertaining.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897326407
Publisher:
Menasha Ridge Press
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Series:
Treating Medical Emergencies Series
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
6.94(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.34(d)

Read an Excerpt

EYES

Prevention tip: Don't stick anything into your eye.

More helpful prevention tip: The eye has a wonderful protection device--the eyelid. This protects from MOST objects traveling towards the eye. The kicker is that you actually have to see the object coming. Therefore the most common objects to contact the eyeball are things that you don't see coming, such as eyelashes, windblown small objects, cinders at night around a campfire. Therefore, during higher danger times such as windy days, bushwhacking through brush, nighttime, especially around a fire, consider more protective eyewear-goggles, glacier glasses, wrap-around glasses, etc.
Treatment: DO NOT stick your finger or anything else into your eye (or rub your eyelid) to attempt to dislodge the object already in your eye. Really, this is a bad idea. Your grandmother told you the same thing and look how good her eyes were (O.K., bad example). However, you do risk converting an easily treatable situation into a protracted nightmare that may jeopardize your vision (such as a deep corneal laceration or a raging eye infection).
DO wash your eye out copiously with water. A hydration bladder with a slit-type mouthpiece (Camelback, etc.) works beautifully for this. Please make sure there is clean water, not beer in the bladder. If it still FEELS like there is something still there (I say FEEL because the object may be gone, but an abrasion or laceration may make it feel like a tree is still in there), you may have a companion try to visualize (no touching!), so that they can direct the irrigation appropriately.

Meet the Author

With wife, Kimberley, Patrick Brighton is active in many outdoor activities including mountain biking, ice/rock climbing, and kayaking. He works part-time as a general surgeon and full time building his house out of old tires. He resides in Ridgway, Colorado.

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