Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight [NOOK Book]

Overview

When Hillary was young, she wanted to be an astronaut, to soar as high as the stars above. She kept reaching up and up as she grew. There were people who told her no. But she didn't listen to them. There were people who didn't think she could do it. But she believed in herself. And Hillary has been making history ever since. This is the inspiring story of a girl with dreams as big as the open sky.
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Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight

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Overview

When Hillary was young, she wanted to be an astronaut, to soar as high as the stars above. She kept reaching up and up as she grew. There were people who told her no. But she didn't listen to them. There were people who didn't think she could do it. But she believed in herself. And Hillary has been making history ever since. This is the inspiring story of a girl with dreams as big as the open sky.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
United States Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton is the subject of this picture-book biography by Kathleen Krull, the author of Harvesting Hope, which won the coveted Jane Addams Children's Book Award. Illustrator Amy June Bates created the artwork for You Can Do It! and numerous other children's books.
Publishers Weekly

This admiring picture book biography views Hillary Rodham Clinton through one specific lens: her whole life is about breaking gender barriers in pursuit of sky-high goals. Krull begins with Clinton's childhood ambition to become an astronaut ("She wrote to the national space agency to volunteer. But it was 1961, and some paths were still closed to women") and ends with her run for the presidency: "Was the land ready? No matter-she was propelling her way into history." Even the detailed endnotes maintain this simplified focus: the failure of her attempt to reform health care as First Lady is attributed to "several reasons, one of which was that so many people found Hillary's ambitions and independence upsetting." Bill Clinton comes across as a rather shadowy 800-pound-gorilla (is he the hunk pictured presiding over the Yale Law Library?), while the text, which is plenty inspiring in its own right, is weakened by supplemental aphorisms on every spread ("You don't have time for fear" is the maxim accompanying the spread on her breakout Wellesley graduation speech). Bates (The Dog Who Belonged to No One) contributes radiant if consciously heart-tugging illustrations, imbuing her subject with both an endearing geekiness and determined idealism. Ages 5-10. (Aug.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Kathryn Erskine
This account of the almost-Democratic-nominee for President gives readers a real feel for who Hillary Clinton is, what inspired her, and how she came so far. Born at a time when certain avenues were closed to girls, among them the ability to be an astronaut, she looked for other ways in which she could excel and make her mark on the world. The author uses flying analogies throughout the text to explain how her subject spread her wings and began to soar. Hillary was not beautiful, she was not rich, and she had a variety of obstacles to face. In short, she was like a lot of girls then and now, though the obstacles might be different, but Hillary believed in herself and put in a lot of effort, which worked then and, it is important for young readers to know, can still work now. People made fun of her looks, of her involvement in politics, even of her family life, but that did not dissuade her, and although she might not have become President, the author appropriately assures us that we will have a woman President one day, because there are other girls who dream to fly. The text is supplemented by quotes related to flying that reiterate the theme. The illustrations are somewhat cartoonish, in a joyful, appealing way. Reviewer: Kathryn Erskine
School Library Journal

K-Gr 4

Krull incorporates imagery of flight throughout this adulatory overview of Clinton's life. From her thwarted childhood dreams of becoming an astronaut to her decision to sail through the clouds in a presidential bid, Clinton overcame numerous obstacles in the way of advancement for women. Hand-lettered inspirational quotations appear on each spread. Attractive watercolor, gouache, and pencil illustrations depict her disappointments and achievements. Visual elements such as balloons, birds, and planets reinforce the airborne theme. Extensive endnotes provide background about the scenes depicted. Independent readers might consult these pages for a more complete biography that ends with a list of all the women who have run for president plus related titles. Ardent Clinton supporters may relish this homage, but others probably would appreciate a more down-to-earth biography.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato

Kirkus Reviews
When young Hillary Rodham's hopes of joining NASA as an astronaut were dashed because she was a girl, she didn't stop dreaming or doing, all the way (almost) to the top. Following Clinton from girlhood to the presidential campaign trail, the narrative hits on many of the high points and as few of the low points as possible along the way (as First Lady, "she tried to cover a lot of ground, and not everything she did was a success"). As seen in Bates's watercolor, gouache and pencil illustrations, she goes from a perky, ponytailed girl to the somewhat careworn but determined figure readers will recognize, each spread complemented by a bromide (e.g., "Find heroes to lift you up")-not, apparently, Clinton's own. Timed for release with the Democratic National Convention, this picture-book hagiography nevertheless has a dated feel to it already, although the conclusion hedges its historical bets: "Not afraid to fly, daring to compete, she decided to run for the highest office in the land. Was the land ready? No matter-she was propelling her way into history." (author's notes, sources) (Picture book/biography. 4-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416984870
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 8/26/2008
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 1,216,184
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • File size: 496 KB

Meet the Author

Kathleen Krull is the author of Fartiste (with Paul Brewer), illustrated by Boris Kulikov, A Woman for President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull, illustrated by Jane Dyer, and Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought), illustrated by Kathryn Hewitt, as well as a number of other acclaimed biographies for young readers. She lives in San Diego, California.
Amy June Bates has illustrated many books for children, including That’s What I’d Do and Sweet Dreams by Jewel; Waiting for the Magic by Patricia McLachlan; Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight by Kathleen Krull; The Dog Who Belonged to No One by Amy Hest; and You Can Do It! by Tony Dungy. She graduated from Brigham Young University and now lives with her husband and three children in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Visit her at AmyBates.com.
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Introduction

Discussion Questions

Note to the teacher: Before reading Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight, ask your students what they know about Hillary Clinton. Then, after finishing the book, hold a class discussion. What did your students learn about Hillary from reading the book?

Hillary's first career goal was to become an astronaut. Why do you think she initially chose this as a future career? How is being an astronaut similar to the careers she has held throughout her life? How is it different? What are your career goals right now?

Hillary always believed in herself and was motivated to succeed from a very young age. Why do you think Hillary kept working hard when there were so many people who told her that she couldn't do well? Who and what helped her in her quest for success?

In the Flying Facts section at the end of the book, we learn that Hillary was a good athlete growing up, but there were no sports teams for girls when she was young. How do you feel about this? Are you surprised?

Many other paths were closed to women when Hillary was young in the early 1960s. But much has changed since then. Looking back at the book, talk about the numerous obstacles Hillary faced as a woman. Then discuss how life is different for women today. Why do you think the world changed?

There are many inspirational messages and phrases throughout Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight. Once you have finished reading the book, go back to find and reread all of the phrases. Why do you think the author put these messages and phrases in the book? Which do you find the most inspiring and appealing? Do you think the book would be the samewithout them?

Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight features many notable historical figures, such as John F. Kennedy Jr., Sally Ride, Martin Luther King Jr., Margaret Chase Smith, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Marian Wright Edelman. According to the book, whom did Hillary admire? Whom did she not admire? Why?

With your classmates, talk about the role of the president of the United States. What qualities should a person possess to be a good president? Why do you think our nation has yet to elect a female president? Do you think Hillary will one day continue her quest to be the president of the United States? Do think you will see a woman in the White House during your lifetime? Would you like to be president one day?

Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight teaches us about Hillary Clinton's life. What else did you discover from reading this book? What lessons did you learn?

Hillary had many dreams and ambitions throughout her life. Discuss your dreams and goals for the future with your classmates. What do you need to do to attain these dreams?

Hillary worked hard to make a difference in her life and the lives of others. What does it mean to make a difference? Talk with your classmates about the steps you can take to make a difference in your families, school, and community.

What is a metaphor? Find examples of metaphors used in the book. Discuss their meaning with your classmates.

Activities and Research

Although Hillary Clinton did not attain the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, she is still a senator from the State of New York. Find out more about senators by visiting the library or conducting research on the Internet. A good place to start is www.senate.gov. Try to answer the following questions:

  • What is the job of a senator?
  • How many senators are there in the U.S. government?
  • How long does a senator hold office?
  • Who are the senators from your state?
  • What two things make Hillary Clinton a unique senator?

Hillary has held many important positions in her political career, such as First Lady, senator, and potential Democratic presidential candidate. Research these positions and compare and contrast these jobs. How are they similar? And how are they different? In what way has each role prepared Hillary to take on the presidency of the United States?

Hillary was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001. During this time, she was inspired by the work of another First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt (1933-1945). Learn more about Eleanor Roosevelt. Consult the following website for information: www.firstladies.org. How did Eleanor's time as First Lady compare to Hillary's tenure as First Lady? Were they typical First Ladies?

Do further research on the organizations that influenced Hillary throughout her life. For example, find out more about the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Organization for Women (NOW), and the Children's Defense Fund.

Who are women involved in politics today who might consider Hillary Clinton their inspiration? Read a newspaper to find out about other politically active women on a local, state, and national level.

Imagine what it would be like to invite Hillary Clinton to your classroom or school. Create a time line and plan for her visit. What activities would you arrange? What questions would you ask her? What else would you do to welcome Hillary to your school?

Interview a woman who grew up at approximately the same time as Hillary Clinton. For example, talk with or e-mail a female relative, friend or teacher to find out if these women encountered many of the same obstacles. In addition, get your subject's view on how the world has changed for women since they were young. Report your findings to the class with either an oral or written report.

Note to the teacher: Older students can continue their research of the Senate by focusing on women's history and the Senate. Ask them to find out the answers to the following questions:

  • How many women have served as senators?
  • How many are currently serving as senators?
  • Are there any states that have not yet elected a female senator to Congress?
  • Which political party has sent the most female senators to Congress?
  • When was the first woman elected to the Senate, and who was this woman?

Hillary has worked on several issues and causes throughout her life. For example, she fought for children's rights as a young lawyer. Find out more about the other concerns Hillary has supported in her career. Which issues is she currently most devoted to, and why?

Did you know that there were many other women who also strived to become president of the United States? With your classmates, research and discover more about these women, who are listed in the Flying Facts section of the book. Who are they, and what qualified them to run for president of the United States? Why did they not ultimately succeed?

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Interviews & Essays

An Interview with Kathleen Krull

Q: There is so much information out there about Hillary Clinton, especially in these past few months. What inspired you to write a children's book about Senator Clinton?

A: The idea for the book came out of a discussion with Rubin Pfeffer after watching the Las Vegas debate on November 15. I was so excited by how sure of herself she was, completely surrounded by men, articulating her positions with precision, plus the poise to make retorts like, "People are not attacking me because I'm a woman; they're attacking me because I'm ahead." To me she looked like a sure-fire winner, and I was thrilled to plan the first book out there about our possible first woman President. The next day I remembered that she had originally dreamed of being an astronaut and that NASA had rebuffed her (no girls allowed, back in 1961). The book took shape from there -- "Once there was a girl who wanted to fly" -- with a flying metaphor to convey the barriers she's had to overcome in her distinguished career.

Women's history is one of my passions (as with my earlier books such as Wilma Unlimited, Pocahontas: Princess of the New World, and especially Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels [and What the Neighbors Thought]); so is doing whatever I can to promote the idea of a woman president, as in another book, A Woman for President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull. Woodhull was the first to run, Clinton the one who has gotten the farthest, with twenty-eight other women in between. When I visit schools I ask how many kids think they will see a woman in the White House during their lifetime. Almost all hands shoot into the air, except for those of a few frowning boys. So there is still work to do.

Q: Tell me about the research you did prior to writing this book.

A: Like many people, I actually knew a lot about her because I've been following her career for a long time. But to research this story I read every recent, reliable book about her. As with all my projects, I look for scholarly books that an authority has spent years on, most notably in this case Carl Bernstein's A Woman in Charge. Normally I mistrust autobiographies as a source, as the writers tend to exaggerate and rearrange to their own advantage, but Clinton's Living History was helpful in giving clues about where she derived her strength, the words of wisdom/positive messages I sprinkle through the book. All of the information in this book comes from the list of sources at the end.

For all that people do know about her, I also find that there are lots of misconceptions. So I was excited about getting some of this research out there -- for kids and adults. For example, her career has been truly stellar (twice she was named one of the hundred most influential lawyers in America); competing in politics on her own as a New York State senator was one of the hardest decisions she's ever made; she's faced innumerable instances of discrimination besides the NASA rejection when she was fourteen; and much more.

Q: How were you able to make Senator Clinton's complicated life story age-appropriate and accessible for young children?

A: I broke her life story into fifteen scenes that were representative and visual. In this book I wanted to reach the youngest readers, both boys and girls, and so I kept distilling the story into its most elemental arc. Basically, it's a lot of hunching over a computer, whittling, synthesizing, simplifying, excavating the meaning of events. I saved all the details for the back matter, for kids writing reports or those who want to know more.

For their help, I owe deepest thanks to my editor, Alexandra Cooper; the book's designer, Laurent Linn, and above all Amy June Bates, whose illustrations bring Clinton to life on the page in the most amazing way.

Q: What do you hope children will retain after reading this book?

A: That girls can do anything, and it's thanks to women who paved the way before them. The fact that Clinton didn't win the nomination is disappointing to be sure (although: go, Obama!). But when I wrote the ending to this book the nomination was still up in the air, so I worded it carefully to clarify that no matter what happens, she's succeeded in making a difference. Or, as she more eloquently pointed out in her concession speech, this particular glass ceiling now has "about 18 million cracks in it."

And of course the story is not over (as of this moment in June)-who knows what else she will accomplish? As the poet Maya Angelou writes in a powerful poem about Clinton: "You may tread me in the very dirt / But still, like dust, I'll rise."

Q: Why do you think it is important for children to be informed about our election process?

A: I remember, as a kid, staying up late with my parents to watch the Kennedy-Nixon debates, which is where my interest in politics began. Whatever we can do -- my particular method is biography -- to hook children into learning about how our government works is crucial. As the last eight years have shown, the person in the White House makes a very real difference. We all need to be paying more attention-maybe especially kids, as they grow into informed voters who take an active part.

Q: What are you working on next?

A: Many projects, including my Giants of Science series of chapter-book biographies, which included a strong woman last year (Marie Curie) and is continuing with Einstein and Darwin. Please visit www.kathleenkrull.com and my blog at http://inkrethink.blogspot.com/search/label/Kathleen%20Krull.

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Reading Group Guide


Discussion Questions

Note to the teacher: Before reading Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight, ask your students what they know about Hillary Clinton. Then, after finishing the book, hold a class discussion. What did your students learn about Hillary from reading the book?

Hillary's first career goal was to become an astronaut. Why do you think she initially chose this as a future career? How is being an astronaut similar to the careers she has held throughout her life? How is it different? What are your career goals right now?

Hillary always believed in herself and was motivated to succeed from a very young age. Why do you think Hillary kept working hard when there were so many people who told her that she couldn't do well? Who and what helped her in her quest for success?

In the Flying Facts section at the end of the book, we learn that Hillary was a good athlete growing up, but there were no sports teams for girls when she was young. How do you feel about this? Are you surprised?

Many other paths were closed to women when Hillary was young in the early 1960s. But much has changed since then. Looking back at the book, talk about the numerous obstacles Hillary faced as a woman. Then discuss how life is different for women today. Why do you think the world changed?

There are many inspirational messages and phrases throughout Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight. Once you have finished reading the book, go back to find and reread all of the phrases. Why do you think the author put these messages and phrases in the book? Which do you find the most inspiring and appealing? Do you think the book would be the same without them?

Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight features many notable historical figures, such as John F. Kennedy Jr., Sally Ride, Martin Luther King Jr., Margaret Chase Smith, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, and Marian Wright Edelman. According to the book, whom did Hillary admire? Whom did she not admire? Why?

With your classmates, talk about the role of the president of the United States. What qualities should a person possess to be a good president? Why do you think our nation has yet to elect a female president? Do you think Hillary will one day continue her quest to be the president of the United States? Do think you will see a woman in the White House during your lifetime? Would you like to be president one day?

Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight teaches us about Hillary Clinton's life. What else did you discover from reading this book? What lessons did you learn?

Hillary had many dreams and ambitions throughout her life. Discuss your dreams and goals for the future with your classmates. What do you need to do to attain these dreams?

Hillary worked hard to make a difference in her life and the lives of others. What does it mean to make a difference? Talk with your classmates about the steps you can take to make a difference in your families, school, and community.

What is a metaphor? Find examples of metaphors used in the book. Discuss their meaning with your classmates.

Activities and Research

Although Hillary Clinton did not attain the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, she is still a senator from the State of New York. Find out more about senators by visiting the library or conducting research on the Internet. A good place to start is senate.gov. Try to answer the following questions:

  • What is the job of a senator?
  • How many senators are there in the U.S. government?
  • How long does a senator hold office?
  • Who are the senators from your state?
  • What two things make Hillary Clinton a unique senator?

Hillary has held many important positions in her political career, such as First Lady, senator, and potential Democratic presidential candidate. Research these positions and compare and contrast these jobs. How are they similar? And how are they different? In what way has each role prepared Hillary to take on the presidency of the United States?

Hillary was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001. During this time, she was inspired by the work of another First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt (1933-1945). Learn more about Eleanor Roosevelt. Consult the following website for information: firstladies.org. How did Eleanor's time as First Lady compare to Hillary's tenure as First Lady? Were they typical First Ladies?

Do further research on the organizations that influenced Hillary throughout her life. For example, find out more about the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Organization for Women (NOW), and the Children's Defense Fund.

Who are women involved in politics today who might consider Hillary Clinton their inspiration? Read a newspaper to find out about other politically active women on a local, state, and national level.

Imagine what it would be like to invite Hillary Clinton to your classroom or school. Create a time line and plan for her visit. What activities would you arrange? What questions would you ask her? What else would you do to welcome Hillary to your school?

Interview a woman who grew up at approximately the same time as Hillary Clinton. For example, talk with or e-mail a female relative, friend or teacher to find out if these women encountered many of the same obstacles. In addition, get your subject's view on how the world has changed for women since they were young. Report your findings to the class with either an oral or written report.

Note to the teacher: Older students can continue their research of the Senate by focusing on women's history and the Senate. Ask them to find out the answers to the following questions:

  • How many women have served as senators?
  • How many are currently serving as senators?
  • Are there any states that have not yet elected a female senator to Congress?
  • Which political party has sent the most female senators to Congress?
  • When was the first woman elected to the Senate, and who was this woman?

Hillary has worked on several issues and causes throughout her life. For example, she fought for children's rights as a young lawyer. Find out more about the other concerns Hillary has supported in her career. Which issues is she currently most devoted to, and why?

Did you know that there were many other women who also strived to become president of the United States? With your classmates, research and discover more about these women, who are listed in the Flying Facts section of the book. Who are they, and what qualified them to run for president of the United States? Why did they not ultimately succeed?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    Tundra

    She curls up and crys loudly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2014

    Striking and Fang's den

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2014

    Fang

    None of my siblings have one)) *he fell asleep*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    She didnt want to be an astrounat......

    Check yur facts

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