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Hints on Advocacy: Useful for Practice in Any of the Courts ...
     

Hints on Advocacy: Useful for Practice in Any of the Courts ...

by Richard Harris
 
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026685127
Publisher:
Waterlow Bros. & Layton
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
622 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER II. AS TO EXAMINATION-IN-CHIEF. One of the most important branches of advocacy is the examination of a witness in-chief. As a rule, a young barrister, if he be bold, and he may be bold through fear, throws himself into his work like one who plunges into the water before he can swim. There must under such circumstances be much floundering and confusion. The nervousness that is necessarily felt when he rises in Court before an experienced judge, whose eye is like a microscope for his faults, and who is not always tender in his criticism, would be a terrible drawback, even if the junior were master of his work. As a rule, however, he has very little notion as to how a witness should be examined. He feels, too, that there are around him those who are too prone to "mark what is done amiss," not from ill- nature, by any means, but from habit. His nervousness increases in proportion as his want of practical experience makes itself more and more manifest to himself. One can scarcely conceive of a situation more unenviable than this. I do not pretend that any observations about to be made will cure all this, or give him experience ; but it is hoped that some of my remarks will so far be advantageous as to enable him to avoid many errors, and to keep in the well-trodden path of experienced advocates. One fact should be remembered to start with, and it is this, the witness whom he has to examine has probably a plain straightforward story to tell, and that upon the telling it depends the belief or disbelief of the jury, and their consequent verdict. If it were to be told amid a social circle of friends it would be narrated with more or less circumlocution and considerable exactness.But all the facts would come out; and that is the first thing to ensure if the case be, as ...

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