Hip Hop Essentials, Vol. 8

Hip Hop Essentials, Vol. 8

     
 
If there's one volume of the Hip Hop Essentials series that is most prone to being called out for containing too many tracks that are either too common or misrepresentative, it's probably this one. Had Tommy Boy relied strictly on the basics, the series would've been criticized for recycling too much, and if the label had

Overview

If there's one volume of the Hip Hop Essentials series that is most prone to being called out for containing too many tracks that are either too common or misrepresentative, it's probably this one. Had Tommy Boy relied strictly on the basics, the series would've been criticized for recycling too much, and if the label had gone with nothing but less-recognized material, the series wouldn't have received nearly as much attention. Tommy Boy had to know that the series would not please everyone, so they tried to find a balance between obvious classics and relatively deeper tracks, and they pulled it off pretty favorably. On this disc, the label's desire to find a happy medium is most clear. The inclusions of Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five's "The Message," Salt-N-Pepa's "Push It," and Kurtis Blow's "If I Ruled the World" will repel seasoned rap fans (though no rap fan should be without them); and then there are some questionable choices made with 3rd Bass ("The Gas Face" instead of "Steppin' to the A.M."), Brand Nubian ("Slow Down" instead of "One for All"), Heavy D & the Boyz (who make their first of two appearances), and Ice-T ("Colors" instead of "6 'N the Mornin'," or "New Jack Hustler," or about six others). Absolutely no one should have a problem with A Tribe Called Quest's "Check the Rhime," Schoolly D's "Gucci Time," and the "Native Tongues Decision" version of De la Soul's "Buddy."

Editorial Reviews

Entertainment Weekly - Michael Endelman
This set chronicles hip-hop's rise from New York-based folk art to global force, a rap-for-dummies comp that does all the crate-digging for you.....All micro-trends are accounted for: smooth operators (LL Cool J), hippies (De La Soul), gangstas (N.W.A.), virtuosos (Rakim), radicals (Public Enemy) and the jokers (Biz Markie). A must-have for aging b-boys and 50 Cent-quoting teens. [A -]

Product Details

Release Date:
01/24/2006
Label:
Tommy Boy
UPC:
0661868164121
catalogNumber:
1641
Rank:
152853

Tracks

Album Credits

Technical Credits

Kurtis Blow   Producer
Don Nix   Composer
3rd Bass   Producer
Angela Brown   Composer
Trevor Horn   Composer,Producer
Ice-T   Producer
Afrika Islam   Producer
Malcolm McLaren   Composer
Johnny Mercer   Composer
Ali Shaheed Muhammad   Composer
David Reeves   Composer
Sylvia Robinson   Composer
Tom Silverman   Executive Producer
Kenny Withrow   Composer
Malik Taylor   Composer
Joseph Broussard   Composer
Gwendolyn Chisholm   Composer
Cheryl Cook   Composer
Maxwell Dixon   Composer
Kamaal Fareed   Composer
Kevin Wolahan   Art Direction
Edward Fletcher   Composer,Producer
Ralph Williams   Composer

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