Hip Pocket Guide To HTML 4.01

Hip Pocket Guide To HTML 4.01

5.0 2
by Ed Tittel, James M. Stewart, Chelsea Valentine
     
 
Hip Pocket Guide to HTML 4.01 is your handy, pocket-sized reference to the latest standard for Web page construction. Its small size makes it easy to take with you wherever you need to know the details of tag syntax, proper attributes, and the correct context to use them in. Coding at home? No problem, pop the book open on its comb binding to stay open to the page

Overview

Hip Pocket Guide to HTML 4.01 is your handy, pocket-sized reference to the latest standard for Web page construction. Its small size makes it easy to take with you wherever you need to know the details of tag syntax, proper attributes, and the correct context to use them in. Coding at home? No problem, pop the book open on its comb binding to stay open to the page you need while you type. Heading out to a client's site? Stick the Hip Pocket Guide in your purse or briefcase, not one of those $50 fifty pound HTML books.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764547195
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
05/26/2000
Edition description:
SPIRAL
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.94(w) x 8.48(h) x 0.82(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

About the Authors Ed Tittel is a 19-year computer industry veteran who currently runs a training and consulting company, LANWrights, Inc. He has contributed to more than 100 books, including the bestselling HTML 4 For Dummies® and XML For Dummies®. James Michael Stewart is a full-time writer at LANWrights, Inc., whose books include Intranet Bible. Chelsea Valentine is a trainer, writer, and Webmaster at LANWrights, Inc.

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Hip Pocket Guide To HTML 4.01 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
beltouche More than 1 year ago
I've had this book on my shelf since it was first published. It is very concise and a great reference for easy look-up of tags.
I only wish there were an updated version to cover XHTML 1.0 transitional and strict, as 8 years is quite old for a computer book.
Ed Tittle! Where are you!?
Guest More than 1 year ago
this makes a wonderful reference! It gives you loads of attributes for the tags, and even tells you which tags are deprecated. Nice examples too. Concise. But not hip-pocket sized.