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Hippie
     

Hippie

by Barry Miles, Ana Mata (Translator)
 

The second half of the 1960s was a time of constant changes and tireless exploration for the generation born after World War II. A great exchange of ideas occurred that would have a great impact on the politics, morals, philosophy, and customs of the time, and on those of generations to come. This book is a tribute to the hippie movement and an enlightening

Overview

The second half of the 1960s was a time of constant changes and tireless exploration for the generation born after World War II. A great exchange of ideas occurred that would have a great impact on the politics, morals, philosophy, and customs of the time, and on those of generations to come. This book is a tribute to the hippie movement and an enlightening study of the consequences those multidisciplinary initiatives would have on that generation and those to come. In addition to the chronicle of one of the key figures of the movement, author Barry Miles, other distinguished activists of the time contribute to this book. This is an illustrated and psychedelic panoramic view of that which transpired between the years 1965 and 1971, and of what came afterward.

 

La segunda mitad de la década de los sesenta fue una época de cambios constantes y de infatigable exploración para la generación nacida después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Se produjo un gran intercambio de ideas que iban a tener una incidencia notable en la política, la moral, la filosofía y las costumbres de la época, y en las de las generaciones venideras. Este libro es un tributo a dicho movimiento y un alumbrador estudio de las consecuencias que esas iniciativas multidisciplinarias iban a tener en aquella generación y en las venideras. Junto a la crónica de una las figuras clave del movimiento, el autor Barry Miles, se presentan las contribuciones de los activistas más destacados de la época. Es una panorámica ilustrada y psicodélica de cuanto transcurrió entre los años 1965 y 1971, y de todo lo que sucedió en adelante.

Editorial Reviews

Christopher Hitchens
… photographs (plus a certain pungent reek that some people, such as myself, never actually inhaled) are the best mnemonic prompting. To turn the shiny pages of Hippie is to breathe deeply.
— The New York Times
Booklist
(STARRED REVIEW). The watershed 1960s can be gloriously re-experienced in the pages of this magnificent oversize volume. The swinging sixties will live forever for the boomers who came of age in that decade; for their parents, who, at the time, felt uncomfortable with the abrupt shifts they observed in values and attitudes (to say nothing of dress); and now for their children, who listen to the rock music of that era and wonder, Was it really all that cool? Miles uses the hippie as a metaphor for the whole cultural experience of the 1960s and its impact on American – no, world – political and social life. As is so graphically documented here, the hippie was the epitome of the youth culture and very much defined the times. This was the great era of protest; hippies stood outside society, and from that vantage point, they offered both valid and off-the-wall criticism. This luscious book, its textual accompaniment as spirited as its bounty of dynamic illustrations (including candid photos, album covers, and publicity shots), establishes the wide social boundaries of the movement – from antiwar activities to fashion and music and cinema – and spotlights the individuals most important to the counterculture, from Bob Dylan to Jim Morrison, from Ken Kesey to Abbie Hoffman. And, of course, the new-arrivals display potential of this book is rich and varied. Wayne Koestembaum’s biography Andy Warhol (2001) could be set beside it as collateral reading, as could Bruce Spizer’s The Beatles are Coming! (2004) and the Autobiography of Martin Luther King (1998), a collection of King’s writings. Also, don’t forget to use books and even actual artifacts pertaining to gay liberation, fashions of the time, cinema, and all other aspects of distinctive sixties culture.
August 2004 issue
Nick Gillespie
To his credit, Miles, best known as a biographer of those proto-hippies, the Beats, doesn't shy away from the dark side of '60s youth culture. The Manson Family, not just the Merry Pranksters, appears in DayGlo detail. Nor does he gloss over the misogyny at the heart of much of "freak culture," even as he convincingly argues it ultimately helped to liberate women, gays and straights. The freshest part of the book is the attention paid to European variants, and the colorful reprints from the censored English underground mag Oz are worth the price of Hippie alone.
— The Washington Post

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788496879133
Publisher:
Global Rhythm Press S.L.
Publication date:
09/01/2006
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.40(d)

Meet the Author

Barry Miles is an English author whose work focuses on the London underground of the 1960s, a time during with he co-owned the Indica Gallery, helped start the independent newspaper International Times, and collaborated with The Beatles on their founding of Apple Records. He has written several books, and his work is still published in left-wing newspapers. Ana Mata is the translator.

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