Hippopotamus Pool [NOOK Book]

Overview

Is the Hippopotamus Pool a legend? Or Amelia's nemesis!

A masked stranger offers to reveal an Egyptian queens' lost tomb - and Amelia Peabody and her irascible archaeologist husband Emerson are intrigued, to say the least. When the guide mysteriously disappears before he can tell them his secret, the Peabody-Emersons sail to Thebes to follow his trail, helped - and hampered - by their teenage son Rameses, and beautiful ward Nefret. Before the sands of time shift very far, all of...

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Hippopotamus Pool

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Overview

Is the Hippopotamus Pool a legend? Or Amelia's nemesis!

A masked stranger offers to reveal an Egyptian queens' lost tomb - and Amelia Peabody and her irascible archaeologist husband Emerson are intrigued, to say the least. When the guide mysteriously disappears before he can tell them his secret, the Peabody-Emersons sail to Thebes to follow his trail, helped - and hampered - by their teenage son Rameses, and beautiful ward Nefret. Before the sands of time shift very far, all of them will be risking their lives foiling murderers, kidnappers, grave robbers, and ancient curses. off once again on a rollicking adventure involving archaeology, murderers, kidnappers, grave robbers and ancient curses.

And the hippopotamus Pool? It's a legend of war and wits that Amelia is translating, one that alerts her to a hippo of a different type - a nefarious, overweight art dealer who is on course to become her new arch-enemy!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
A menacing cloud hangs over the eighth adventure of 19th-century archeologists Amelia Peabody and her husband, Radcliffe Emerson (seen before in The Snake, the Crocodile and the Dog). Unfortunately, the cloud rains suspense only in the book's final quarter, long after the warning of a dire threat has paled. In Cairo, Amelia and Emerson are visited by a mysterious man who shows them a scarab ring and claims that it is the symbol of the High Priest of Queen Tetisheri, whom he has sworn to protect. He offers to lead them to her tomb, thereby passing his "sacred duty" onto Emerson. But after the man acts as if he's poisoned and then vanishes, the couple dismiss his words. They are soon reminded of his visit when a notorious antiquities dealer, whom they liken to a hippopotamus because of his girth, warns them to watch whom they trust. With their preteen son, Ramses, and their ward, Nefret, the family travels to western Thebes in search of Tetisheri's tomb. There, after a series of minor mishaps, Ramses is abducted, requiring Amelia and Emerson to begin what seems a nearly impossible task to get him back. The melodramatic 19th-century writing style studded with Amelia's sly wit makes this series unique to the subgenre of historical mysteries. Major ad/promo. (Apr.)
Library Journal
A masked stranger pinpoints the location of an Egyptian queen's lost tomb for Amelia and husband Emerson and then disappears. The pair set off in search of queen Tetisheri's tomb, encountering all the usual amusing situations, disguises, villains, and murderers. A necessary purchase.
Emily Melton
The prolific Peters' latest features intrepid British feminist and Egyptologist extraordinaire Amelia Peabody Emerson. Amelia, along with handsome husband Radcliffe, precocious son Ramses, and attractive young ward Nefret, returns to her beloved Thebes, this time to excavate a heretofore undiscovered tomb that supposedly contains the remains--and priceless treasures--of Queen Tetisheri. Amelia's old nemesis, the Master Criminal, may be gone, but there are still plenty of obstacles to overcome: heat, bats, rock avalanches, assorted thieves and scoundrels, greedy antiquities dealers, pesky tourists, and ambitious journalists, not to mention a wickedly tricky art dealer with the physique of a hippopotamus and a mousy governess who's not the quiet scholar she first seems. The excavation is progressing satisfactorily if slowly. Then Ramses and Nefret are kidnapped. Terrified for the youngsters' safety, Amelia must use all of her considerable detecting skills--including the dreaded parasol-weapon--to find out who has taken the children and why. Although readers familiar with the series may find the plot all too familiar, they won't care much because it is Peters' wonderful, rapid-fire wit and the delightful Amelia herself--practical, strong minded, and, for a Victorian lady, quite liberated and free-thinking--that make this series such a long-running success.
New York Times Book Review
"If the reader is tempted to draw anotehr obvious comparison between Amelia Peabody and Indiana Jones, it's Amelia -- in wit and daring -- by a landslide.
Marilyn Stasio
"Another daring exploit in 19th-century Egypt...it's a dandy one...such fun." -- New York Times Book Review
Washington Times
"Give yourself a serious treat by getting this one immediately...[And] if you have a bad back, get out the old girdle, because otherwise you are going to hurt your ribs laughing."
Seattle Times
"Great fun!" -- Seattle Times/Post-Intelligencer
Baltimore Sun
"The Hippopotamus Pool will reassure Elizabeth Peters fans -- the sparkle and the suspense never lessen."
Kirkus Reviews
Once more into the ancient tombs of Egypt with staunch 19th- century archaeologists Amelia Peabody and Radcliffe Emerson (The Snake, the Crocodile and the Dog, 1992, etc.). With their powerful enemy Sethos disposed of, the Emersons—along with loquacious son Ramses and lovely young ward Nefret—are aboard their boat Amelia, moored on the Nile, as they prepare to explore the possible site of Queen Tetisheri's tomb in Thebes. The undertaking was prefaced by a strange encounter in a Luxor hotel with a mysterious stranger who talked of reincarnation, claimed to know the tomb's exact location, and died of poison in the middle of the meeting. His body vanished, to be found days later floating in the Nile. All of this the Emersons attribute to Signor Riccetti, kingpin of illicit trade in antiquities. Meanwhile, there are other evil forces to reckon with, like Abd el Hamed, a rival dealer, whose abused apprentice David, a grandson of Radcliffe's trusted helper Abdullah, comes under Amelia's wing and later proves his worth when Ramses is kidnapped. Nefret, too, is at risk, but with help from Radcliffe's brother Walter, his sensitive wife Evelyn, and Amelia's usual fearless and intuitive instinct, all ends well for everyone but the bad guys.

Like many of the previous seven in this series, a wordy confusion of vile intentions, powerful enemies, dramatic rescues, excruciatingly detailed forays into the ancient past, and Amelia's cool. Fans of the latter may love it, but most readers will be numbed by the heavy-handed plotting.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781780334509
  • Publisher: Constable & Robinson
  • Publication date: 9/1/2011
  • Series: Amelia Peabody Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 300
  • Sales rank: 96,060
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Peters

Elizabeth Peters was born and brought up in Illinois and earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. Peters was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

You can learn more at:
ameliapeabody.com

Biography

Neither the Great Depression nor the lack of a public library in her small hometown of Canton, Illinois, deterred Barbara Mertz (the future Elizabeth Peters) from becoming an avid reader. Yet, when her family moved to a suburb of Chicago, she was elated to discover the riches contained in the town's local library and proceeded to devour every book she could get her hands on. She began writing in high school; but by that time she had already decided to become an archaeologist.

Mertz received a scholarship to the University of Chicago, which boasted a world-famous Egyptology department. Her mother, an eminently practical soul, encouraged her daughter to become a teacher; but after taking only two education courses, Mertz knew a career in the classroom was not for her. Determined to follow her dream, she moved over to the university's Oriental Institute, and received her Ph.D. in Egyptology at the age of 23.

The post-WWII job market wasn't kind to women in general, much less to women seeking careers in archaeology. Mertz married and began a family, but never lost sight of her life's ambition. While she was raising her two children, she decided to try her hand at writing. Her first few attempts were never published, but they did land her an agent; and in 1964 she published her first book, Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs: A Popular History of Ancient Egypt.

Mertz authored two additional works on archaeology before foraying into fiction in 1966. The Master of Blacktower is the first of several gothic suspense novels written under the pseudonym Barbara Michaels. (In her biography, she explains that the use of pseudonyms helps readers to distinguish various types of books written by a single author.) The supernatural elements in the thrillers penned under the Michaels name have kept readers on the edge of their seats for decades.

In the 1970s, Mertz began writing under her second, more famous pseudonym, Elizabeth Peters. As Peters, she has authored books in three different series. Beginning in 1972 with The Seventh Sinner (1972), the first series features a glamorous librarian-turned-romance novelist named Jacqueline Kirby (the final Jacqueline Kirby mystery, Naked Once More, won a coveted Agatha Award in 1989). The second series, starring American art historian Vicky Bliss, debuted in 1973 with Borrower of the Night (Vicky's last outing was 2008's Laughter of Dead Kings). Then, in 1975, Peters introduced her most famous protagonist, archeologist/sleuth Amelia Peabody, in a dandy adventure entitled Crocodile on the Sandbank.

From the first, readers loved Amelia, a plucky Victorian feminist who—together with her husband, the distinguished Egyptologist Radcliffe Emerston—has gone on to solve countless mysteries in the Middle East. Peabody fans received an extra treat in 2003 with Amelia Peabody's Egypt: A Compendium to Her Journals, a nonfiction stroll through ancient Egypt that included nearly 600 photographs and illustrations, plus expert academic articles.

In addition to her three series, Mertz has written several standalone suspense novels as Elizabeth Peters. She has this to say about her successful, prolific career: "The craft of writing delights me. It is impossible to attain perfection; there is always something more to be learned—figuring out new techniques of plotting or characterization, struggling with recalcitrant sentences until I force them to approximate my meaning. And nothing is ever wasted. Everything one sees and hears, everything one learns, can be used."

Good To Know

The pseudonym Elizabeth Peters is taken from her two children, Elizabeth and Peter. She uses three pseudonyms so readers can tell the difference between the three types of books she writes: nonfiction archaeology as Barbara Mertz, supernatural thrillers as Barbara Michaels and historical mysteries as Peters. For the record, Mertz has called the pseudonyms "a horrible nuisance."
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    1. Also Known As:
      Barbara Mertz, Barbara Michaels
    2. Hometown:
      A farm in rural Maryland
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 29, 1927
    2. Place of Birth:
      Canton, Illinois
    1. Date of Death:
      August 8, 2013

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 56 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(35)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2004

    An Egyptian Treasure in Itself

    If there is any problem with The Hippopotamus Pool, it is the excess of riches that Elizabeth Peters lavishes on her readers. As in all of her later novels, once her wonderful cast of characters started to grow, it is possible to lose track of the mystery in the family reunion. Still, the characters, the setting, and the style are dazzling, and the mystery won't disappoint.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 23, 2013

    Excellent Series

    Who wouldn't love Amelia Peabody and her family? I am in the process of re-reading the series and adding the books to my nook. The author is a credited Egyptologist so you will only get the true history of Egypt which I love, but add that to excellent writing, little or no profanity and you have a very readable, and enjoyable series of books. The author gives just the right amount of romance and mystery/suspense to engage men or women readers. I highly recommend this series for pure enjoyment, just hope the author will write more, I believe there are presently 19.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2013

    Dig in to another swell Amelia Peabody mystery

    Full of fun and excitement, this is a wonderful chapter in the series. I've read them all and this one is excellent. But, you'll want to start at the beginning, won't you?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2014

    Kit

    She sits in her bathroom panting holding her head. She grabs a cup of water and leaves

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2013

    emerson and peabody are the perfect couple.

    always dashing here and there to save the antiqularies and rounding up criminals as they go about their everyday chores of being the finest egyptologist in egypt

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2012

    The dirt tunnle

    Its a dirt tunnle

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2012

    Steve

    Gtg sorry

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    ST RIP PARTY!!!!!

    At live first result (involves nook s*x)

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2012

    Jjr

    Darn

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2012

    Xavier

    Hello

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    HOUSEPARTY at manson

    -VIV

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2012

    Breezie

    Mineis green an hey whats up

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    J

    Jk gangstars shoot him until im dead

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    Emma

    Loser

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2010

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    Posted October 12, 2009

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    Posted May 18, 2010

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