Hiroshima in the Morning

Hiroshima in the Morning

2.9 17
by Rahna Reiko Rizzuto
     
 

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In June 2001 Rahna Reiko Rizzuto travels to Hiroshima to interview survivors of the atomic bomb, while her husband and two young sons remain in New York. But initial interviews feel rehearsed, and the survivors reveal little beyond already published accounts. Then September 11 changes everything. The vulnerability exposed by the attacks shatters the survivors'

Overview

In June 2001 Rahna Reiko Rizzuto travels to Hiroshima to interview survivors of the atomic bomb, while her husband and two young sons remain in New York. But initial interviews feel rehearsed, and the survivors reveal little beyond already published accounts. Then September 11 changes everything. The vulnerability exposed by the attacks shatters the survivors' carefully constructed narratives. They open up to Rizzuto in astonishing ways, describing in detail their agonizing experiences.

Separated from her family as the world seems to be falling apart, Rizzuto sees her marriage begin to crumble as she questions her role as a wife and mother. The parallel narratives of Hiroshima in the survivors' own words, and of Rizzuto's personal awakening show memory not as history, but as a story we tell ourselves to explain who we are.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“A brave compassionate, and heart-wrenching memoir, of one woman’s quest to redeem the past while learning to live fully in the present.” —Kate Moses, author of Cakewalk, A Memoir and Wintering

"This searing and redemptive memoir is an explosive account of motherhood reconstructed." —Ayelet Waldman, author of Red Hook Road

"This book is an important contribution to the growing understanding that we are all part of history, and we all make history. A moving account of a contemporary voyage, which is also a voyage back in time, reckoning with and bearing witness to one of the great tragedies of the last century." —Susan Griffin, author of A Chorus of Stones

"If remembering lies at the heart of all memoir, the best memoir goes far deeper, asking questions about the propulsive nature of time, the consequences of forgetting, and the treacherous liberations of solitude. Hiroshima in the Morning is a memoir of the most sophisticated kind, a lyric, a quest, a universal poem." —Beth Kephart, author of A Slant of Sun

"Rahna Reiko Rizzuto's new book is intimate and global, lyrical and clear-eyed, a compelling personal narrative, and an important social document. Here past and present, Hiroshima and 9/11, interweave to tell a story of unendurable loss and tragedy but also of tenacity, survival, and rebirth" —Lauren Kessler, author of Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558616677
Publisher:
Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author


Rahna Reiko Rizzuto’s highly acclaimed first novel, Why She Left Us, won an American Book Award in 2000, and was praised by the New York Times as “ambitious, lyrical, and intriguing.” She is a recipient of the US/Japan Creative Artist Fellowship, funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, which inspired her memoir, Hiroshima in the Morning; she is also the associate editor of The NuyorAsian Anthology: Asian American Writings About New York City; and she is a faculty member in the MFA in creative writing program at Goddard College where she teaches fiction and nonfiction. Her essays and short stories have appeared in journals and newspapers including the Los Angeles Times, Salon, and the Crab Creek Review, and in anthologies including Mothers Who Think, Because I Said So, and Topography of War. Rizzuto is half-Japanese/half-Caucasian. She grew up on the Big Island of Hawaii and now lives in Brooklyn.

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Hiroshima in the Morning 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore and I chose to read this book for my project. I thought the book was good, however, the author described more about her life than the actual event of Hiroshima. I would have been more interested in reading about the bombing rather than her very personal life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
 I am a high school sophomore and I chose to read this book for my project. I thought this book was good because of the many accounts it gave about the survivors and their struggles after the bomb. also liked that this book explains her experiences when she visited some of memorials dedicated to the atomic bombing and how it felt to be there. However, I found that the book went into too much detail when it came to her personal life. I also found that it did not have all the information I needed to complete my project without the use of other resources. At some parts in the book she also went into too much detail about her struggles in Japan instead of the bombing itself. I would have liked to have read more about the survivors and how they dealt with the attack and more about the atomic bomb itself. I would have also liked to have read more about how the survivors are doing today and how their children were affected by the bombing as well as how they feel about the nuclear weapons that around the world today. Overall, this was a book if you wanted to read more about the survivors in the aftermath of the bombing. 
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