Hiroshima

( 4 )

Overview

Describes the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, particularly as it affects Sachi, who becomes one of the Hiroshima Maidens.

Describes the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, particularly as it affects Sachi, who becomes one of the Hiroshima Maidens.

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Overview

Describes the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, particularly as it affects Sachi, who becomes one of the Hiroshima Maidens.

Describes the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, particularly as it affects Sachi, who becomes one of the Hiroshima Maidens.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Yep's account of the bombing of Hiroshima and its devastating aftermath is at once chilling and searing, hushed and thundering. Within a factual framework, the author sets the fictional story of a girl named Sachi, allegedly a composite of several young residents of the bombed city. On the morning of August 6, 1945, 12-year-old Sachi and her classmates pull on their pitifully inadequate air-raid hoods when an alarm sounds, signifying the approach of an American bomber. They and others feel, ironically, a deep sense of relief when the aircraft passes by-the plane's mission, in fact, is to scout out the weather over Hiroshima; if there are clouds, the Enola Gay will be directed to drop its atom bomb on another city. But a single gap opens in the clouds directly over the target site, and "the sunlight pours through the hole on to the city." This is the last bit of brightness in Yep's story, which with haunting simplicity describes the actual bombing: "There is a blinding light like a sun. There is a boom like a giant drum. There is a terrible wind. Houses collapse like boxes. Windows break everywhere. Broken glass swirls like angry insects." Though Yep's spare, deliberate description of the bomb's consequences delivers a brutal emotional punch-and though it is on the whole extremely well suited to the target audience-his novella has some jarring stylistic elements. Broken into brief chapters ("The Bomb," "The City," "The Attack," "Destruction," "Peace?"), the narrative is choppy. The text, for example, makes a hasty chronological jump from the announcement that WWII is over to Sachi's experience as one of 25 "Hiroshima Maidens," who in 1955 traveled to the United States for plastic surgery to correct disfiguring burns. And although expressing an opinion is clearly the novelist's prerogative, it should be noted that the story Yep relays is hardly balanced; witness the two simple sentences about the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, which make no mention of the resulting human casualties: "Four years before, on December 7, 1941, Japanese planes attacked American ships in Hawaii without warning. Caught by surprise, many ships and planes were wrecked at the naval base, Pearl Harbor." Yet in what is one of his tale's most haunting moments, Yep interjects the resonant words of an American-the Enola Gay's copilot-who, surveying the destruction just after the bomb has hit Hiroshima, scribbles a note to himself: "What have we done?" This powerful chronicle ensures that what was done on that awful day will remain in readers' memories for a very long time. Ages 8-11. (May)
Children's Literature - Leila Toledo
I was a young girl when the atom bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan in August of 1945. I remember the fear and the question rattling around in my head, Why? Why did we do this? Hiroshima does not answer this question but it relates the events as I remember them. Weaving the events around two sisters, Riko and Sachi, gives readers a sense of being there. This well written book should stimulate discussion on the horrors of war and the need for world peace.
Children's Literature - Deborah Zink Roffino
Yep tells the story of 12-year old Sachi, who witnessed the arrival of the B-29 carrying the atom-bomb. Seriously scarred and burned, Sachi's pain is felt in Yep's clipped, brittle style. She is a composite of several children who survived the destruction that brought an end to World War II. For better readers, the spellbinding account by an award-winning writer, blends fact and fiction.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Through a stacatto, present-tense narration that moves back and forth between the experiences of a 12-year-old girl and the men on the Enola Gay, Yep's novella tells the events of the day the first atomic bomb was dropped and its aftermath. Sachi survives but is badly burned; her sister dies and her soldier father is killed in action. For three years the girl spends most of her time indoors, as newcomers to the city fear the scarred survivors. Then she travels to America for plastic surgery, which enables her to take part in her society again. She returns to Japan, hoping to help other victims. Yep ends with two chapters on the destructive potential of nuclear warfare and on some of the efforts being made toward disarmament. His words are powerful and compelling, and the facts he presents make readers realize the horrors of that day and its impact beyond. As a fictional character, Sachi never becomes much more than a name, but even so, readers will be moved by her tale. Hiroshima has a more adult format than Junko Morimoto's more personal My Hiroshima (Viking, 1990) or Toshi Maruki's Hiroshima No Pika (Lothrop, 1982), both of which tell the story in pictures as well as in words.-Louise L. Sherman, Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780590208338
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/1/1996
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 356,952
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 660L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 7.56 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Meet the Author


Laurence Yep is the acclaimed author of more than sixty books for young people and a winner of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award. His illustrious list of novels includes THE JOUNRAL OF WONG MING-CHUNG, A CHINESE MINER; the Newbery Honor Books DRAGONGWINGS and DRAGON'S GATE from the Golden Mountain Chronicles; The Tiger's Apprentice trilogy; THE DRAGON AWAKES: THE SAN FRANSCISCO FIRE OF 1906; and THE DRAGON'S CHILD: A STORY OF ANGEL ISLAND, which he cowrote with his niece, Dr. Kathleen S. Yep.

Mr. Yep lives in Pacific Grove, California, with his wife.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2006

    this book is so touching. i love it!

    basically the title says it all. this book is just sooooo touching! i strongly reccommend it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2001

    Hiroshima

    This book was based on many kids who died or survived in the bombing at hiroshima,Japan. The story tells of a girl who only her and her mother and a few other people survive the bombing and what happens afterword.A very good historical fiction book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2012

    Hiroshima is a book about war between the Americans and Japanese

    Hiroshima is a book about war between the Americans and Japanese. So the age for the book for the book is around ten and up. It couldn’t be for eight year olds because I don’t think they are mature enough for this kind of stuff. I think they would be running around saying stuff to Japanese people that would offend them such as “USA bombed you guys we are better than you” I just think that would offend them and so they shouldn’t say stuff and possibly make another war break out. Another thing that I think would be bad is how they 8 year olds shouldn’t be learning about war and how to kill lots of people they should be learning other stuff like Math ,Science , or Language.
    My favorite part of the book is when the Americans drop the bomb. I think it’s interesting to see how the Japanese react they put a coat on and get under their desk. Afterwards when the bombs hit the girl goes flying across the floor and she hurries and runs to the nearest river and jumps in to cool herself down. The girl does survive, but she does have very bad burns and is very lucky to be living.
    I think boys would like this book a lot better than girls would because girls aren’t really in to killing things such as boys are too. Also boys are in to war things and most girls are not. Another thing is that I guess girls could like this book because it’s a very emotional book if you are an emotional person.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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