Hiroshima's Shadow

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Delayed in order to include contributions by Joseph Rotblat and Kenzaburo Oe, two recent Nobel Peace Prize winners, and the haunting photographs of Yosuke Yamahata, as well as a completely new cover design, Hiroshima's Shadow will at last be available this spring.

Any American who reads this collection of essays will be compelled to fundamentally reevaluate their understanding of the history and politics underlying the decision to use atomic weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. ...

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Overview

Delayed in order to include contributions by Joseph Rotblat and Kenzaburo Oe, two recent Nobel Peace Prize winners, and the haunting photographs of Yosuke Yamahata, as well as a completely new cover design, Hiroshima's Shadow will at last be available this spring.

Any American who reads this collection of essays will be compelled to fundamentally reevaluate their understanding of the history and politics underlying the decision to use atomic weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. This unsettling volume draws together a distinguished group of international historians and writers who through careful research have pierced the rationales for the atomic bombing presented by members of the Truman Cabinet following the annihilation of both cities and their civilian populations. Important elements of this research became a central part of the highly controversial 1995 Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum which was first censored and then ultimately canceled.

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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
An exhaustive, controversial, and moving volume that has its origins in the Smithsonian Institution's cancellation of a planned exhibition in 1994รพ95 of the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. To be included in the exhibition's script were several scholarly studies and a number of historical documents that questioned the military necessity and moral legitimacy of that act. The book, then, moves along two paths: a painstaking analysis of how and why the bomb came to be used, and a provocative deliberation on what the editors (Bird, a contributing editor of the Nation, and Lifschultz, former South Asia correspondent of the Far Eastern Economic Review) term the "pathology of denial" in the US surrounding our use of the bomb. While voices in support of the bombing of Hiroshima are to be found here, most of the contributors in various ways attempt to debunk the myths and assumptions that have built up concerning this act. The first part of the book offers selections by present-day historians. The second part is devoted to essays written shortly after the bombing. Part three focuses on the Smithsonian controversy itself. Part four presents chilling first-person accounts of the day Hiroshima died. The final part is devoted to historical documents, memos, and diary entries of those who participated in the decision to use the bomb and also public statements pleading against this decision. As a century of extreme barbarism draws to a close, the editors ask us to think critically about the US contribution to this barbarism, the unleashing upon the world of atomic and nuclear weapons. Their purpose is not to apportion blame, to point fingers, but rather toallow us to look at our history and perhaps gain what is often so elusive: wisdom. (8 b&w photos)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780963058744
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Product dimensions: 0.18 (w) x 25.75 (h) x 0.04 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface: A Social Conscience for the Nuclear Age
Introduction: The Legend of Hiroshima
I Hiroshima Myths vs. Modern Scholarship
Historians Reassess: Did We Need to Drop the Bomb? 5
Did the Bomb End the War? 22
The Logic of Mass Destruction 51
The First Nuclear War 63
The Decision to Use the Bombs 78
New Evidence on Truman's Decision 90
Three Attempts to Stop the Bomb 99
Racing to the Finish 119
A Postwar Myth: 500,000 U.S. Lives Saved 130
The Invasion That Never Was 135
The Construction of Conventional Wisdom 141
II The Early Controversy
Seizing the Contested Terrain of Early Nuclear History 163
The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb 197
Thank God for the Atomic Bomb 211
Hiroshima and Modern Memory 223
III The First Critics
The Horror and the Shame 237
Victory for What? The Voice of the Minority 239
Leaving the Bomb Project 253
The Atomic Bomb and Ahimsa 258
Between Hell and Reason 260
The Decline to Barbarism 263
When Cruelty Becomes Pleasurable 269
The Return To Nothingness 272
Our Relations To Japan 275
Nothing But Nihilism 278
What Hath Man Wrought! 281
Gentlemen: You Are Mad! 284
John Hersey and the American Conscience 288
The "Hiroshima" New Yorker 303
The Literacy of Survival 305
An Opinion On Hiroshima 307
Has It Come To This? 309
IV Censoring History at the Smithsonian
The Battle of the Enola Gay 317
Unconditional Surrender at the Smithsonian 338
Memory, Myth and History 343
The Smithsonian Suffers Legionnaires Disease 353
How the U.S. Press Missed The Target 364
The War of the Op-Ed Pages 376
V Shadows
The Day Hiroshima Disappeared 415
The Unsurrendered People 433
Summer Flower 443
Hiroshima Memories 453
Beyond The Ashes 462
Fifty Years After Hiroshima 474
VI Documents
The Pevil of Universal Death 485
Atomic Warfare & The Christian Faith 488
Japan's Struggle To End The War 501
The Grew Memo: Accept Emperor As Post-War Constitutional Monarch 505
The Marshall Memo: Change the Terms of Unconditional Surrender 509
The McCloy Diary: Marshall Argues Restrict First Use to Military Target 511
The Leahy Diary: Prospect of a Negotiated Surrender 515
The Forrestal Diary: Japanese Peace Feelers 517
The Magic Intercepts: Japanese Terms for Conditional Surrender 523
The Stimson Memo: Prior Warning with "Ample Time" 527
The Bissell Memo: Prospects for Japan's Surrender 533
The Forrestal Diary: McCloy's Dissent on the Emperor & Prior Warning 537
The Truman Diary: Soviet Entry Means Japanese are "Fini" 539
The McCloy Diary: Warning, Surrender & Truman's "Big Red Apple" 541
The Brown Diary: August 3rd Byrnes Acknowledges Japan "Looking For Peace" 543
The Stimson Diary: The Soviets & the S-1 Master Card 549
The July 17th Petition of Manhattan Project Scientists 552
A Note on the July 17th Petition 557
Epilogue
The World Court Opinion 563
Contributors
Select Bibliography
Acknowledgements
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 1999

    A Must-Have Collection of Essays

    This is a collection of essays from 1945 to 1998 on the political, military, and moral aspects of the atomic bombing of Japan in World War II. Also included are excerpts from the diaries of those involved in the decision to drop a-bombs on Japan. The accumulation of so many difficult to obtain documents in one collection is a welcome and useful tool for anyone studying the atomic bombings. Some of the essays support the atomic bombings, while most of the essays question whether the a-bombings were necessary to save lives. This is a must-have book for anyone interested in what went on behind the scenes with the a-bombing of Japan.

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