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His Family
     

His Family

3.5 9
by Ernest Poole
 

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Pulitzer Prize Winner - 1918

His Family is a novel by Ernest Poole published in 1917 about the life of a New York widower and his three daughters in the 1910s. It received the first Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1918.[1]

His Family tells the story of a middle class family in New York City in the 1910s. The family's patriarch, widower Roger Gale,

Overview

Pulitzer Prize Winner - 1918

His Family is a novel by Ernest Poole published in 1917 about the life of a New York widower and his three daughters in the 1910s. It received the first Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1918.[1]

His Family tells the story of a middle class family in New York City in the 1910s. The family's patriarch, widower Roger Gale, struggles to deal with the way his daughters and grandchildren respond to the changing society. Each of his daughters responds in a distinctively different way to the circumstances of their lives, forcing Roger into attempting to calm the increasingly challenging family disputes that erupt.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012395283
Publisher:
RainWall Publishing
Publication date:
03/21/2011
Series:
Pulitzer Prize Winners , #2
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
721,286
File size:
277 KB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Ernest Poole (1880 - 1950) was a U.S. novelist. He was born in
Chicago, Illinois on 23 Jan 1880, and graduated from Princeton
University in 1902. He worked as a journalist and was active in
promoting social reforms including the ending of child labor. He
was a correspondent for the Saturday Evening Post in Europe before
and during World War I. His novel The Harbor has remained the work
for which he is best known. It presents a strong socialist message,
set in the industrial Brooklyn waterfront. It is considered one of
the first fictional works to offer a positive view of unions. His
portrait of a New York family titled His Family made him the first
recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1918. In 1917, for
The New Republic magazine he went to Russia to report on the
Russian Revolution. He died in Franconia, NH on 10 Jan 1950.
Source: Wikipedia

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His Family 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
puzzleman More than 1 year ago
Probably a good examination of women's issues in the early 20th century and an overview of the effects of WWI on America. The story is fair to good, but it is not a page-turner. There is too much description of scene and too many downers. The ending leaves you somewhat depressed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this as part of my goal to read all the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction winners. Ernest Poole's novel defines so well the experiences of understanding the world as a father through your children. The story takes up after his wife has died and his daughters have grown. His struggles to understand his children leads him to a insightful understanding of the larger world family that we all are a part of in this life. Ernest Poole seems to have sensed the changes in the values and ideals in society and captures that moment in time with beauty and insight. The novel does seem to lag slightly at first and then plunges deep into the heart and soul of what it means to be family on a nuclear level on up to our membership in the world family of human existence
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think that the best aspect of reading this novel is the certainty of change. How one deals with it is as personal as the elements of the change at hand. The awarenesses brought to light in this novel of the time, customs, language, and norms are revealling (from a curiosity point), and pointed in that the 'issues' are the same with each generation, it seems. I didn't care for most of the descriptors in language, esp.when men spoke. It seemed abnormally 'rough.' Overall, i would recommend this book to others as it was recommended to me. An interesting view of family life; satisfying and intriging.
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