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His Family
     

His Family

3.5 9
by Ernest Poole
 

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The distinguished winner of the first ever Pulitzer Prize is a snapshot of a forgotten era, a New York on the cusp of change in 1917

At risk of becoming estranged from his children, Roger Gale has promised his wife on her deathbed that he will try to build bridges with his three daughters. The daughters in question are not alike: Edith is happily

Overview

The distinguished winner of the first ever Pulitzer Prize is a snapshot of a forgotten era, a New York on the cusp of change in 1917

At risk of becoming estranged from his children, Roger Gale has promised his wife on her deathbed that he will try to build bridges with his three daughters. The daughters in question are not alike: Edith is happily married with children and a devoted family woman; Deborah works as a school principal and has yet to marry as she seems to have so little time; Laura seems determined to live on the dangerous side of life, falling in love at the drop of a hat. Roger sees a little of himself in all his disparate children but struggles with the reality of life in which individuals make their own decisions and time seems to be ever rushing on. As he grapples with the evolving world, its politics, and its modern practices, his children are moving with the times: marrying as they wish and following their own political paths. Summer at the family’s beautiful farm in New Hampshire provides yearly respite from New York buzz, where the family can congregate and relax in their own space, but it cannot keep them safe from reality forever. In his struggle to keep his relatives united, Roger will have to face bereavement, divorce, financial ruin, and war. Will he be able to fulfill his promise to his wife or is it already too late for the Gale family?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780899681009
Publisher:
Buccaneer Books, Inc.
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Product dimensions:
5.81(w) x 8.81(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Ernest Poole (1880–1950) was born in Chicago in 1880. After graduating from Princeton University he worked as a journalist and was a correspondent for The Saturday Evening Post in Europe and Russia during World War II. He is best known for his novel The Harbor (1915) but it was in 1918 that he won the Pulitzer Prize for his work His Family.

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His Family 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
puzzleman More than 1 year ago
Probably a good examination of women's issues in the early 20th century and an overview of the effects of WWI on America. The story is fair to good, but it is not a page-turner. There is too much description of scene and too many downers. The ending leaves you somewhat depressed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this as part of my goal to read all the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction winners. Ernest Poole's novel defines so well the experiences of understanding the world as a father through your children. The story takes up after his wife has died and his daughters have grown. His struggles to understand his children leads him to a insightful understanding of the larger world family that we all are a part of in this life. Ernest Poole seems to have sensed the changes in the values and ideals in society and captures that moment in time with beauty and insight. The novel does seem to lag slightly at first and then plunges deep into the heart and soul of what it means to be family on a nuclear level on up to our membership in the world family of human existence
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think that the best aspect of reading this novel is the certainty of change. How one deals with it is as personal as the elements of the change at hand. The awarenesses brought to light in this novel of the time, customs, language, and norms are revealling (from a curiosity point), and pointed in that the 'issues' are the same with each generation, it seems. I didn't care for most of the descriptors in language, esp.when men spoke. It seemed abnormally 'rough.' Overall, i would recommend this book to others as it was recommended to me. An interesting view of family life; satisfying and intriging.
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