Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s by Steve Rajtar, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s

Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s

by Steve Rajtar
     
 

In the decades of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, one could wander through the city of Tampa and experience a rich variety of architectural styles, businesses, languages, and traditions, all mixed in with first-class universities, hospitals, and museums. By the 1950s, the University of South Florida was founded, and Busch Gardens opened to locals and tourists alike. The

Overview

In the decades of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, one could wander through the city of Tampa and experience a rich variety of architectural styles, businesses, languages, and traditions, all mixed in with first-class universities, hospitals, and museums. By the 1950s, the University of South Florida was founded, and Busch Gardens opened to locals and tourists alike. The 1960s ushered in a period of construction and entertainment, with residents visiting for the first time the Lowry Park Zoo, Curtis Hixon Hall, and “The Big Sombrero,” or Tampa Stadium. Like the rest of the country, the 1970s in Tampa was a time of continued modernization and expansion. Though not immune to crime or misfortune in the thirty-year span, Tampa is remembered in Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s as an attractive destination and place of residence, as seen through the lens of the camera, a modern city that continues to honor its historical roots.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A fun-filled look back at Central Florida attractions of yesteryear.” —Orlando Sentinel, about Historic Photos of Florida Tourist Attractions

“Historic Photos of Florida Ghost Towns captures forgotten places and ways of life through pictures of everything from plantations to picnics to prisoners. The lost locations are interesting, but just as compelling are the faces of those in the photos.” —Florida Today

“This rich book offers a glimpse back into historic locations . . . each image invites close examination and evokes feelings of wonder.” —Scott Leon, Orlando Arts Magazine, about Historic Photos of Florida Tourist Attractions

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596528109
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
03/06/2012
Series:
Historic Photos Series
Pages:
216
Sales rank:
1,134,840
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 10.20(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s


By Steve Rajtar

Turner

Copyright © 2012 Steve Rajtar
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9781596528109

Since the 1880s, the workers of Tampa supported a thriving gambling industry. Other crimes were rampant in the area, and when Prohibition was repealed, those who had engaged in bootlegging shifted to gambling and other organized crimes. Crime bosses including Charlie Wall and Santo Trafficante Sr. wielded great power in Tampa, and Trafficante’s son in the mid-1950s allied with New York crime families to expand the scope of illegal activities to include the rest of Florida and Cuba.

During this decade, the federal government became concerned about the Tampa crime problem; thus, hearings were conducted under the leadership of U.S. senator Estes Kefauver. As a result, the extent of the crime problem was put on public display. Formerly prominent crime boss Charlie Wall testified against the mob then in power and was rewarded with a severed throat, blunt force trauma to the back of his head, and nine knife wounds to his face. The discovery of his corpse helped to emphasize the severity of the problem, and a campaign to repair the city’s image was begun.

The decade also saw the establishment of two major institutions in the city. The University of South Florida was founded and Busch Gardens opened. The university has grown tremendously and, with the older University of Tampa, makes the city a destination for students seeking either private or state-supported higher education. Busch Gardens started small but quickly grew to be the state’s major theme park, as opposed to the smaller tourist attractions which had previously drawn visitors to the state. Busch Gardens remained Florida’s most popular tourist attraction until the opening of Walt Disney World in 1971.



Continues...

Excerpted from Historic Photos of Tampa in the 50s, 60s, and 70s by Steve Rajtar Copyright © 2012 by Steve Rajtar. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

“A fun-filled look back at Central Florida attractions of yesteryear.” —Orlando Sentinel, about Historic Photos of Florida Tourist Attractions

“Historic Photos of Florida Ghost Towns captures forgotten places and ways of life through pictures of everything from plantations to picnics to prisoners. The lost locations are interesting, but just as compelling are the faces of those in the photos.” —Florida Today

“This rich book offers a glimpse back into historic locations . . . each image invites close examination and evokes feelings of wonder.” —Scott Leon, Orlando Arts Magazine, about Historic Photos of Florida Tourist Attractions

Meet the Author

Steve Rajtar has written over 20 books, each dealing with history, particularly that of Florida. Among these works are Historic Photos of Florida Tourist Attractions, Historic Photos of Gainesville, Historic Photos of the University of Florida, and Historic Photos of Florida Ghost Towns, all available from Turner Publishing. Rajtar grew up near Cleveland, Ohio, and after graduating from the University of Central Florida and the University of Florida, entered the practice of law. He continues in that profession today.

A love of the outdoors and a fascination with local history inspired one of his hobbies: leading historical tours in Florida’s communities of today and yesteryear.

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