Historic Photos of Texas Oil

( 2 )

Overview


On January 10, 1901, near Beaumont, Texas, an unremarkable knoll of earth the world would soon call Spindletop shot a geyser of oil a hundred feet into the air, confirming the belief of Pattillo Higgins that black gold lay buried there. The Texas oil industry had begun in earnest, and neither Texas nor the world would ever be the same. In the years to come, Texas oil would fuel the nation’s automobiles and help to bring victory to the Allies in both world wars, shaping America’s destiny throughout the twentieth ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $28.98   
  • New (2) from $73.32   
  • Used (4) from $28.98   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$73.32
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(871)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new and unread! Join our growing list of satisfied customers!

Ships from: Phoenix, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$137.21
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(273)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


On January 10, 1901, near Beaumont, Texas, an unremarkable knoll of earth the world would soon call Spindletop shot a geyser of oil a hundred feet into the air, confirming the belief of Pattillo Higgins that black gold lay buried there. The Texas oil industry had begun in earnest, and neither Texas nor the world would ever be the same. In the years to come, Texas oil would fuel the nation’s automobiles and help to bring victory to the Allies in both world wars, shaping America’s destiny throughout the twentieth century. Join author and historian Mike Cox in this photographic visit to the heyday of Texas crude as he recounts the stories of key oil-patch discoveries around the state. Nearly 200 images in vivid black-and-white, with captions and introductions, offer a roughneck-close look at this uniquely American tale of dry holes and gushers, ragtowns and riches, boomtowns, blowouts, and wildcatters gone broke.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596525313
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 8/26/2009
  • Series: Historic Photos Series
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 10.30 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

An elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters, Mike Cox is the author of 15 nonfiction books. Over a freelance career of more than 40 years, he has also written hundreds of articles and essays for a wide variety of publications. The Texas Rangers: Wearing the Cinco Peso, 1821-1900 (2008) received excellent reviews and has been a best-seller among books about the Old West. Historic Photos of Texas Lawmen is his latest book, released by Turner Publishing Company in recent months.
A former award-winning reporter, Cox was a longtime spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety and later communications manager for the Texas Department of Transportation before retiring in 2007.
These days Cox devotes full time to his freelance writing, while finding time to work in a little fishing and hunting. He lives in Austin with his wife and daughter.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 29, 2011

    A great photographic history.

    I bought this book for a family member who is retired from the "oil patch". I looked it over and was impressed but my relative couldn't get his nose out of it. He had stories to tell about many of the locations and wells that he had a part in drilling in the later days. He said it was the best gift he had received in ages and the last time I saw him, he still had his nose in it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    HISTORY BROUGHT TO VIVID LIFE

    What do you think of when you hear the State of Texas mentioned? Many of you might say oil. Or, perhaps responses would be cattle, wide open spaces or cotton. Actually, oil is what really brought attention to the Lone Star State when the incredible Spindletop field was discovered in 1901.

    Some may think that a gusher and the attendant exhilaration is as pictured in the movie Giant. Not so as you'll find in this assiduously researched volume beginning with a summer day in 1543 when oil was seen floating on the water along the Texas coast through 1942 when major oil companies began building a 1,254 mile pipeline carrying 300,000 gallons of oil a day.

    Over 200 historic photos gathered from the archives of the Texas State Archives, the Texas Energy Museum and the Texas Oil and Gas Association among others are remarkable reminders of a storied past. These photos convey more than words exactly how it was whether it's a pretty working girl in Borger, Texas or rigs reaching toward the sky from Upper Galveston Bay.

    Author 0f 15 nonfiction books Mike Cox is the perfect guide for a look back at those wild and wooly days when it seemed that fortunes were well within reach for many.

    History buffs as well as those with an interest in the oil industry will find much to ponder and enjoy in Historic Photos of Texas Oil.

    - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)