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Historical Dictionary of Tajikistan
     

Historical Dictionary of Tajikistan

by Kamoludin Abdullaev
 

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The emergence of the independent Republic of Tajikistan (Jumhurii Tojikiston) was one of the most painful state building attempts in post-Soviet history. Since 1990, this country has experienced a rise in political activism, freedom of speech, sharp political debates, collapse of state institutions, civic disorder, civil war, an internationally led peace process,

Overview

The emergence of the independent Republic of Tajikistan (Jumhurii Tojikiston) was one of the most painful state building attempts in post-Soviet history. Since 1990, this country has experienced a rise in political activism, freedom of speech, sharp political debates, collapse of state institutions, civic disorder, civil war, an internationally led peace process, return of exiled opposition and their militias, and redistribution of power. As of 2009, Tajikistan continues its gradual shift from the fragile, postwar recovery period towards a more stable, peaceful, conventional and transparent political order and an era of steady economic development. The second edition of the Historical Dictionary of Tajikistan examines this country through a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and over 600 cross-referenced dictionary entries on important persons, places, events, and institutions, as well as significant political, economic, social, and cultural aspects. It is an extremely useful aid in understanding the current situation in Tajikistan.

Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
The second edition (1st, CH, Jun'02, 39-5546) of this handy reference work furnishes updated entries and new articles on places and subjects. As Abdullaev (independent scholar) and Akbarzadeh (Univ. of Melbourne, Australia) point out, Tajikistan 'has [experienced] one of the most painful state-building attempts in post-Soviet history.' The authors encourage Western readers to consider the newly independent nations individually rather than as a conglomerate lumped together under rubrics such as 'war on terror' or 'global oil and gas politics.' They furnish a wealth of detail to introduce this fascinating country, including a chronology (2000 BCE to 2009) with an introduction to the land, geography, people, and historical epochs. Most information focuses on the last two decades. Alphabetical entries cover political leaders, warriors, dynasties, religions, religious leaders, politicians, cultural figures, the arts, social and economic conditions, commodities, bordering countries, and more. Particularly noteworthy are brief topical essays covering macroeconomic, microeconomic, social, political, and historical issues. Appendixes address macroeconomic indicators, 1995-2008; population and labor force, 1990-2008; national accounts, 1991-2007; national ethnic population, 1926-2000; and governments, 1991-2009. An extensive bibliography includes statistics, travel and description, culture, economy, history, politics, science and technology, religion, neighbors, and Internet resources. Recommended.
Booklist
Part of the Scarecrow Historical Dictionaries of Asia, Oceania and the Middle East series, this reference work covers one of the lesser-known 'stans,' a landlocked nation bordering Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, and China. Although Tajikistan has experienced nation-building problems similar to those of other Central Asian republics that became independent after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, it still has a distinct culture, history, and language. The work features A–Z entries covering important individuals, places, events, and ethnic groups along with other political, social, and cultural material. An introductory essay provides useful background information; a chronology, bibliography, and some appendixes supplement the reference value of the work. This second edition updates and revises much content since the publication of the 2002 volume. But the authors also felt that a newer edition might better educate readers to understand that 'Central Asia is not a conglomeration of homogenous ‘stans’ that should be lumped together.' Libraries that don’t own the earlier edition might consider obtaining this well-researched work.
Choice
The second edition (1st, CH, Jun'02, 39-5546) of this handy reference work furnishes updated entries and new articles on places and subjects. As Abdullaev (independent scholar) and Akbarzadeh (Univ. of Melbourne, Australia) point out, Tajikistan 'has [experienced] one of the most painful state-building attempts in post-Soviet history.' The authors encourage Western readers to consider the newly independent nations individually rather than as a conglomerate lumped together under rubrics such as 'war on terror' or 'global oil and gas politics.' They furnish a wealth of detail to introduce this fascinating country, including a chronology (2000 BCE to 2009) with an introduction to the land, geography, people, and historical epochs. Most information focuses on the last two decades. Alphabetical entries cover political leaders, warriors, dynasties, religions, religious leaders, politicians, cultural figures, the arts, social and economic conditions, commodities, bordering countries, and more. Particularly noteworthy are brief topical essays covering macroeconomic, microeconomic, social, political, and historical issues. Appendixes address macroeconomic indicators, 1995-2008; population and labor force, 1990-2008; national accounts, 1991-2007; national ethnic population, 1926-2000; and governments, 1991-2009. An extensive bibliography includes statistics, travel and description, culture, economy, history, politics, science and technology, religion, neighbors, and Internet resources. Recommended.
November 2010 CHOICE
The second edition (1st, CH, Jun'02, 39-5546) of this handy reference work furnishes updated entries and new articles on places and subjects. As Abdullaev (independent scholar) and Akbarzadeh (Univ. of Melbourne, Australia) point out, Tajikistan 'has [experienced] one of the most painful state-building attempts in post-Soviet history.' The authors encourage Western readers to consider the newly independent nations individually rather than as a conglomerate lumped together under rubrics such as 'war on terror' or 'global oil and gas politics.' They furnish a wealth of detail to introduce this fascinating country, including a chronology (2000 BCE to 2009) with an introduction to the land, geography, people, and historical epochs. Most information focuses onthe last two decades. Alphabetical entries cover political leaders, warriors, dynasties, religions, religious leaders, politicians, cultural figures, the arts, social and economic conditions, commodities, bordering countries, and more. Particularly noteworthy are brief topical essays covering macroeconomic, microeconomic, social, political, and historical issues. Appendixes address macroeconomic indicators, 1995-2008; population and labor force, 1990-2008; national accounts, 1991-2007; national ethnic po
May-August 2010 American Reference Books Annual
This work is recommended for all library country study collections.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810873797
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
04/27/2010
Series:
Historical Dictionaries of Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
476
File size:
2 MB

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Meet the Author

Kamoludin Abdullaev is an independent historian from Dushanbe, Tajikistan. From 2001 to 2009, as a visiting professor, Dr. Abdullaev regularly taught modern Central Asian subjects from multidisciplinary perspectives at Yale University, Allegheny College, and the Ohio State University. He has written and edited eight books in English and Russian. In addition, he published over 50 articles in English, Russian, Tajik, and translated into French, and Japanese. Shahram Akbarzadeh is deputy director of the National Centre of Excellence for Islamic Studies at the University of Melbourne, Australia. His research interests include the politics of Islam in the Middle East and Australia, U.S. policy towards the Middle East, and Central Asian politics.

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