Historical Dictionary of the Gilded Age [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Gilded Age was an important three-decade period in American history. It was a time of transition, when the United States began to recover from its Civil War and post-war rebuilding phase. It was as a time of progress in technology and industry, of regression in race relations, and of stagnation in politics and foreign affairs. It was a time when poor southerners began farming for a mere share of the crop rather than for wages, when pioneers settled in the harsh land and climate of the Great Plains, and when ...
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Historical Dictionary of the Gilded Age

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Overview

The Gilded Age was an important three-decade period in American history. It was a time of transition, when the United States began to recover from its Civil War and post-war rebuilding phase. It was as a time of progress in technology and industry, of regression in race relations, and of stagnation in politics and foreign affairs. It was a time when poor southerners began farming for a mere share of the crop rather than for wages, when pioneers settled in the harsh land and climate of the Great Plains, and when hopeful prospectors set out in search of riches in the gold fields out West.

The Historical Dictionary of the Gilded Age relates the history of the major events, issues, people, and themes of the American "Gilded Age" (1869-1899). This period of unprecedented economic growth and technical advancement is chronicled in this reference and includes a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The 13th installment in Scarecrow's "Historical Dictionaries of U.S. Historical Eras" series, this slim volume covers the period of the Gilded Age (1869–1899), first coined by Mark Twain to describe the United States of the day "as a nation with a beautiful, shiny exterior hiding decadent, filthy insides." Featuring 234 entries that range in length from a paragraph to four pages, the work touches on the major themes of the period, covering everything from the unbridled greed of "robber barrons" and political corruption to the rise of the literary scene and the integration of former confederate states into the United States. Upchurch (Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Civil Rights) admits that many people and events have been excluded for the sake of brevity and that this is not an indication of their insignificance; in fact, many were included because they reflect his own academic interest as well as the growing importance of African American studies in U.S. historiography. One quibble: Upchurch states that civil rights icon W.E.B. Du Bois was the first African American to attend Harvard. This distinction actually goes to Richard Greener, though Du Bois was the first African American to attain a Ph.D. from Harvard. BOTTOM LINE The vividly written entries will serve as a good starting point for further research. For more comprehensive coverage of the era, see M.E. Sharpe's three-volume Encyclopedia of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.—Kam W. Teo, Weyburn P.L., Sask
American Reference Books Annual (ARBA)
Author Upchurch is well positioned to produce this handy and fascinating reference work. . . . Readers will find a number of special features quite useful. . . . This is a book worth having for anyone interested in American society during the latter half of the nineteenth century.
October 2009 Booklist
An excellent resource covering a time period in U.S. history that is often forgotten. Recommended for academic and large public libraries.
December 2009 CHOICE
Spanning 1869 through 1889, this volume by Upchurch manages to cover the major players, issues, and events, while also introducing those issues that began in this period and would later define the Progressive Era that followed. . . . This single-volume reference work includes 232 well-written and concise, yet surprisingly detailed, entries with numerous cross-references. It will appeal to students and scholars of American history. Recommended.
September 2010 Reviews In American History
Much to recommend it, and general readers will find it useful…. Excellent array of entries on political practices and reforms…. The entries provide at least entry-level enlightment, and usually a lot more.
American Reference Books Annual
Author Upchurch is well positioned to produce this handy and fascinating reference work. . . . Readers will find a number of special features quite useful. . . . This is a book worth having for anyone interested in American society during the latter half of the nineteenth century.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

T. Adams Upchurch is professor of history at East Georgia College.
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