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Historical Dictionary of United States-Japan Relations

Overview

The most important bilateral relationship in Asia since the end of World War II is assuredly between the United States and Japan. Despite the geographical and cultural differences between these two nations, as well as the bitterness leftover from the war, an amicable and prosperous relationship has developed between the two countries boasting the world's largest economies. As the 21st century progresses, the continuing goodwill between the U.S. and Japan is of the utmost importance, as the peace and stability of ...

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Historical Dictionary of United States-Japan Relations

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Overview

The most important bilateral relationship in Asia since the end of World War II is assuredly between the United States and Japan. Despite the geographical and cultural differences between these two nations, as well as the bitterness leftover from the war, an amicable and prosperous relationship has developed between the two countries boasting the world's largest economies. As the 21st century progresses, the continuing goodwill between the U.S. and Japan is of the utmost importance, as the peace and stability of the Asia-Pacific depends on their cooperation and efforts to contain destabilizing factors in the area. The Historical Dictionary of United States-Japan Relations traces this one hundred and fifty year relationship through a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, a bibliography, and cross-referenced dictionary entries on key persons, places, events, institutions, and organizations. Covering everything from Walt Whitman's poem, A Broadway Pageant, commemorating the visit of the Shogun's Embassy to the U.S. in 1860, to zaibatsu, this ready reference is an excellent starting point for the study of Japan's dealings with the U.S.

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Editorial Reviews

March 2008 American Reference Books Annual
a very useful reference guide and is recommended...
Walter LaFeber
This is a superb, authoritative, and comprehensive guide and dictionary, indispensable for pivotal individuals, as well as for events, treaties, even debates in the extraordinary—and extraordinarily revealing—150 years of relations between Japan and the United States.
August 2009 H-Net: Humanities and Social Science Reviews Online
The compilers of this volume, John Van Sant, Peter Mauch, and Yoneyuki Sugita have drawn on a wide range of sources, listed in the useful sixteen-page bibliography, to produce this wealth of information on a variety of subject areas. . . . The main value of this publication is to be derived from the rich and comprehensive 243-page body of the dictionary. The entries are written in clear and succinct prose, many of which point the reader in the direction of other related head words that are presented in bold type. . . . [A] practical and welcome resource for those studying U.S.-Japanese relations and an important reference work that should definitely be held by institutions with programs in Asian and American studies.
Reference and Research Book News
The Japanese started arriving in America as castaway sailors in the 1840s. By 1853 President Millard Fillmore responded with a commodore, escorted by the biggest battleships in the world, to negotiate trade relationships in Japan. Thus began the complex relationship that developed between the US and Japan, partially based upon "gentlemen's agreements" that excluded the Japanese from the US, and partly based on the threat or reality of war. Working from an initial chronology, these entries describe the people and events that eventually became one of the world's more amicable relationships. Here Junichiro Koizumi expresses his opinion of the US with a denunciation of terrorism at 9/11 followed by a visit to North Korea; here liberal Mike Mansfield impresses conservative Ronald Reagan so much the new president asks Mansfield to retain his post as ambassador to Japan; here we find why Japan's military is even now limited to defense.
May 2007 Reference and Research Book News
The Japanese started arriving in America as castaway sailors in the 1840s. By 1853 President Millard Fillmore responded with a commodore, escorted by the biggest battleships in the world, to negotiate trade relationships in Japan. Thus began the complex relationship that developed between the US and Japan, partially based upon "gentlemen's agreements" that excluded the Japanese from the US, and partly based on the threat or reality of war. Working from an initial chronology, these entries describe the people and events that eventually became one of the world's more amicable relationships. Here Junichiro Koizumi expresses his opinion of the US with a denunciation of terrorism at 9/11 followed by a visit to North Korea; here liberal Mike Mansfield impresses conservative Ronald Reagan so much the new president asks Mansfield to retain his post as ambassador to Japan; here we find why Japan's military is even now limited to defense.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

John E. Van Sant is associate professor of history at the University of Alabama-Birmingham. Peter Mauch is a lecturer of international history at Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, Japan. Yoneyuki Sugita is associate professor of American history at 'saka University of Foreign Studies and author of Pitfall or Panacea: The Irony of US Power in Occupied Japan.

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Table of Contents

Part 1 Editor's Foreword Part 2 Acknowledgments Part 3 Reader's Note Part 4 Acronyms and Abbreviations Part 5 Chronology Part 6 Map Part 7 Images Part 8 Introduction Part 9 THE DICTIONARY Part 10 Appendix A United States Presidents and Secretaries of State, 1789-2005 Part 11 Appendix B Japanese Prime Ministers Part 12 Bibliography Part 13 About the Authors

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