Historical Eclipses and Earth's Rotation

Historical Eclipses and Earth's Rotation

by F. Richard Stephenson
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0521056330

ISBN-13: 9780521056335

Pub. Date: 04/30/2008

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The culmination of many years of research, this book discusses ancient and medieval eclipse observations and their importance in studying Earth's past rotation. This is the first major book on this subject in twenty years. The author has specialized for many years in the interpretation of early astronomical records and their application to problems in modern astronomy

Overview

The culmination of many years of research, this book discusses ancient and medieval eclipse observations and their importance in studying Earth's past rotation. This is the first major book on this subject in twenty years. The author has specialized for many years in the interpretation of early astronomical records and their application to problems in modern astronomy. The book contains an in-depth discussion of numerous eclipse records from Babylon, China, Europe and the Arab lands. The author provides translations of almost every record studied. He shows that although tides play a dominant long-term role in producing variations in Earth's rate of rotation--causing a gradual increase in the length of the day--there are significant and variable nontidal changes in opposition to the main trend. This book is intended for geophysicists, astronomers (especially those with an interest in history), historians and orientalists.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521056335
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
04/30/2008
Pages:
576
Product dimensions:
6.69(w) x 9.61(h) x 1.18(d)

Table of Contents

1. Variations in the length of the day: a historical perspective; 2. Tidal friction and the ephemerides of the Sun and Moon; 3. Pre-telescopic eclipse observations and their analysis; 4. Babylonian and Assyrian records of eclipses; 5. Investigation of Babylonian observations of solar eclipses; 6. Timed Babylonian lunar eclipses; 7. Untimed Babylonian observations of lunar eclipses: horizon phenomena; 8. Chinese and other East Asian observations of large solar eclipses; 9. Other East Asian observations of solar and lunar eclipses; 10. Records of eclipses in ancient European history; 11. Eclipse records from medieval Europe; 12. Solar and lunar eclipses recorded in medieval Arabic chronicles; 13. Observations of solar and lunar eclipses made by medieval Arab astronomers; 14. Determination of changes in the length of the day and geophysical interpretation; Appendix A; Appendix B; References.

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