Historical Sketch of the Judicial Tribunals of New York: From 1623 to 1846 (Classic Reprint)

Historical Sketch of the Judicial Tribunals of New York: From 1623 to 1846 (Classic Reprint)

by Charles P. Daly
     
 

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Excerpt from Historical Sketch of the Judicial Tribunals of New York: From 1623 to 1846

The late Mr. Graham, who published, in 1834, a work on the jurisdiction of our courts, merely copied what he found in Smith, arid went even so far as to assume that there was nothing remaining to show what courts existed among the Dutch, or that would shed any light upon the

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Excerpt from Historical Sketch of the Judicial Tribunals of New York: From 1623 to 1846

The late Mr. Graham, who published, in 1834, a work on the jurisdiction of our courts, merely copied what he found in Smith, arid went even so far as to assume that there was nothing remaining to show what courts existed among the Dutch, or that would shed any light upon the manner in which justice was administered by them. He appears to have relied upon the absence of any information in the pages of Smith, and to have made no investigation himself, for, on the contrary, the records of these early courts, in the Dutch language, from the first establishment of a regular and fixed judicial tribunal, until the close of the Dutch dynasty, have always remained in the city of New-York. It is nearly the same in respect to the first half century after the colony had passed into the hands of the English. All that has been known of the tribunals which then existed, is what has been furnished by Smith. But though his work was written nearly a century ago, and it might be supposed, as he was a lawyer by profession, that he would have taken some pains to investigate, his account, on the contrary, is not only very meagre, but grossly inaccurate. In respect to his own period, and for a quarter of a century before it, he was well informed; but in all that relates to a period anterior, bis history is of little or no value. Since his time, no attempt has been made thoroughly to investigate the subject. Indeed, without the aid of the documentary information, obtained by Mr. Brodhead from the state offices at Loudon and at the Hague, it would have been difficult to do so. The deposit, however, in the state department at Albany, of copies of the documents found by Mr. Brodhead, has supplied facts heretofore wanting, while the admirable arrangement and classification of the colonial manuscripts, by Dr. O'Callaghan, has enabled an investigator to get at sources of information which before were scarcely within his reach. To the latter gentleman the writer returns his acknowledgments for facilities afforded in inspecting these manuscripts, for much valuable information, and many useful hints in the course of his inquiries.

The colony of New Netherland was planted by the West India Company, a commercial corporation of Holland. This corporation had obtained from the states general an exclusive charter or patent, to found colonies and carry on trade, navigation and commerce upon the coast of Africa, North America and the West Indies; and, for this purpose, was invested, among other things, with the most comprehensive judicial powers. It was exclusively entrusted with the administration of justice in the colonies it should establish, having the right to appoint governors, officers of justice, and all other public officers; to maintain order and police, and generally, in the language of the charter, to do all that the service of those countries might require. The government of this gigantic corporation was vested in five separate chambers, to one of which, the chamber of Amsterdam, was committed the management of the affairs of New Netherland, the general executive power of the whole body being entrusted to nineteen delegates, representing conjointly the separate chambers and the states general, and which was known by the appellation of the College of Nineteen. The colony of New Netherland was formally organized by May, the first director or governor appointed for it by the Amsterdam chamber, and a settlement was established at Manhattan, the present site of the city of New York, in 1623.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781331314530
Publisher:
FB &c Ltd
Publication date:
07/13/2015
Pages:
76
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.16(d)

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